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Free eBook Karmesin: The World's Greatest Criminal -- Or Most Outrageous Liar (Lost Classics Ser) download

by Gerald Kersh

Free eBook Karmesin: The World's Greatest Criminal -- Or Most Outrageous Liar (Lost Classics Ser) download ISBN: 1932009035
Author: Gerald Kersh
Publisher: Crippen and Landru (June 30, 2003)
Language: English
Pages: 170
Category: Imaginative Literature
Subcategory: United States
Size MP3: 1285 mb
Size FLAC: 1780 mb
Rating: 4.5
Format: rtf txt lrf lrf


Gerald Kersh (1912–1957) wrote amazing novels and hundreds of short stories about the weird and wonderful people he met during his lifetime. The most intriguing was Karmesin.

Gerald Kersh (1912–1957) wrote amazing novels and hundreds of short stories about the weird and wonderful people he met during his lifetime.

Start by marking Karmesin: The World's Greatest Criminal - Or Most Outrageous Liar as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Gerald Kersh (1912–1957) wrote amazing novels and hundreds of short .

book by Gerald Kersh.

Karmesin : The World's Greatest Criminal - Or Most Outrageous Liar. Lost Classics Ser. English.

The character of Karmesin is larger than life and a complete original and . They are nicely produced with good introductions and in most cases a useful Bibliography.

The character of Karmesin is larger than life and a complete original and the stories,although a little similar to each other are well worth reading. What I really like about the publishers,'Crippen & Landru', is the high standard that they set themselves in their titles. This volume is no exception. Library descriptions.

Gerald Kersh (1911-1968) published more than thirty books, including the noir classic Night and the City (1938) and Fowlers End (1957), which Anthony Burgess called "one of the great comic novels of the century," as well a. .

Gerald Kersh (1911-1968) published more than thirty books, including the noir classic Night and the City (1938) and Fowlers End (1957), which Anthony Burgess called "one of the great comic novels of the century," as well as hundreds of short stories which were once ubiquitous in British an.With The Song Of The Flea (1948) Gerald Kersh revisited the demi-monde of his famous Night And The City; but this novel concerns a writer, striving doggedly to make his living. with this book Mr Kersh has taken a big step forward.

Karmesin: The World's Greatest Criminal – or Most Outrageous Liar (Crippen & Landru, 2003), stories. The World, the Flesh, & the Devil: Fantastical Writings, Volume I (Ash-Tree Press, 2006), stories. In 2013 Valancourt Books began reprinting many of Kersh's titles. Nightshade and Damnations (1968), with an introduction by Harlan Ellison (Reprinted in 2013). Fowlers End (1957), with an introduction by Michael Moorcock (Reprinted in 2013)

Gerald Kersh (Kersh, Gerald). used books, rare books and new books. Karmesin: The World's Greatest Criminal-Or Most Outrageous Liar: ISBN 9781932009026 (978-1-932009-02-6) Hardcover, Crippen & Landru, Publishers, 2003.

Gerald Kersh (Kersh, Gerald). Find all books by 'Gerald Kersh' and compare prices Find signed collectible books by 'Gerald Kersh'. The Angel and the Cuckoo. ISBN 9780453000840 (978-0-453-00084-0) Hardcover, The New American Library, 1966. Find signed collectible books: 'The Angel and the Cuckoo'.

Gerald Kersh was born in 1911. Download more by: Gerald Kersh. Find and Load Ebook Karmesin.

THIEF EXTRAORDINAIRE? Gerald Kersh (1912–1957) wrote amazing novels and hundreds of short stories about the weird and wonderful people he met during his lifetime. The most intriguing was Karmesin, a master thief and self–confessed genius. His robberies, cons and double–crosses involve split–second timing, almost supernatural foresight, and spine-tingling nerve. But is he telling Kersh the truth? For the first time all 17 short stories are collected in a single volume so that you can decide for yourself. This collection is edited and introduced by Paul Duncan, who has been researching Gerald Kersh for over 10 years in preparation for a biography. The cover painting is by Carol Heyer, and the design by Deborah Miller.
User reviews
Xava
Good book, good price, fast shipping.
Lli
Gerald Kersh was a prolific author during the 1930s through until the 1960s, particularly when it came to short stories. Like so many authors of his era, he produced an enormous number of short stories that were published in newspapers and magazines of the day and then later picked up by pulp magazines such as Black Mask, Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine and Argosy.
One publisher is now performing the wonderful task of gathering together many authors' short stories and compiling books containing a single author's works. That publisher is Crippen and Landru. Although Kersh's Karmesin stories have been reprinted individually over the years in various publications, they have never been put together in the one book...until now.
As all of the Crippen and Landru books do, Karmesin begins with a very informative introduction providing tremendous insight into the author. An explanation is given into how the stories came about including anecdotes from Kersh himself, as well as the real life person upon whom Karmesin is based. I found the introduction in this book to be a wonderful lead in to the stories themselves, and then found myself referring back to it as I finished each story.
The book contains 17 short stories and they range in length from 5 to 13 pages; just ideal to finish a single story if you have 10 minutes to spare or for settling in and reading the lot in one sitting.
Each story unfolds in much the same way. They open with Karmesin admonishing Kersh (who acts as Karmesin's disbelieving audience) for doubting his stories. At the same time he scoffs at the crimes that are committed nowadays, claiming that not only could he pull off a better burglary, blackmail or robbery but that he already has. He then proceeds to tell a tale of fantastic achievement that is hugely entertaining and brilliant in its simplicity and success. For, as Karmesin keeps reminding Kersh, he is a genius and a master-criminal.
The contradiction to Karmesin, and the reason for the title to the book, is that, while he claims to be the most successful criminal the world has ever seen, and while he claims to have easily pulled off crimes that have netted him hundreds of thousands of dollars, pounds and francs, he invariably finishes his story by cadging a cigarette or the money for a cup of tea off Kersh. As he explains when questioned as to where the money went, he can't remember every penny he ever spent.
Karmesin is a curmudgeonly old cuss, but an entertaining character who I would best describe as a lovable old rogue. Many of his stories rely on perfect timing and as he explains in The Conscience of Karmesin: "mediocrity chooses an hour where genius picks its instant!" No story is too tall to be passed off as an exploit. And how tall are the tales that he tells? Among the 17 stories, he uses a ghost named Henry as an accomplice (twice) and in another describes how he stole the crown jewels. Of course, not all of the stories are this fantastic, but in each Karmesin highlights the brilliance of his plan and the success in which he carried it out.
At the end of the book, a Karmesin bibliography is included detailing where and when each of the stories was published. To finish the book off, a reading list that details Kersh's novels and a couple websites containing more information about the author are added.