Free eBook Off Keck Road download

by Mona Simpson

Free eBook Off Keck Road download ISBN: 0375410104
Author: Mona Simpson
Publisher: Knopf; 1st edition (October 17, 2000)
Language: English
Pages: 176
Category: Imaginative Literature
Subcategory: United States
Size MP3: 1278 mb
Size FLAC: 1549 mb
Rating: 4.9
Format: lrf azw lrf txt


Also by Mona Simpson. for Richard Appel and Allan Gurganus. The road was paved only as far as there were houses, eight in all. From where she was, Bea could see the road ending, and beyond that, fields led down to the railroad tracks.

Also by Mona Simpson. The houses looked small and hastily built, but the land out here was magnificent.

MONA SIMPSON is the author of five novels, including Off Keck Road which was a finalist for the PEN/Faulkner Award and won the Heartland Prize of the Chicago Tribune. She lives in Santa Monica, California. Библиографические данные.

Off Keck Road left me somewhat disappointed As a huge fan of Mona Simpson's Anywhere but Here, I am sad to admit that I was disappointed with Off Keck Road

Off Keck Road left me somewhat disappointed. The story centered around Bea, a woman who grew up in Green Bay, left for a short time during college and briefly after, returns to her home town where she cares for her mother and develops a career and niche for herself. As a huge fan of Mona Simpson's Anywhere but Here, I am sad to admit that I was disappointed with Off Keck Road. The cover is so pretty and the dust jacket description of a coming of age story in a small town set my expectations high.

Their efforts at festivity wore out quickly; after birthday celebrations, they were all back at their desks, cake eaten, within twenty minutes. He looked up at her oddly. Should we run away together. to New York? We could catch Bill Evans playing the Village Vanguard. He extracted her flexible needles from her hands, crushed her fists into his, and nicked her shoes with his into a fox-trot, singing, ‘So let’s keep dancing. Just bring on the news and have a ball. If that’s all. There i.

Simpson at the National Book Festival in January 2014.

Stacey D'Erasmo said, "'Off Keck Road' marks the place where origin leaves off and improvisation begins". My Hollywood was published in 2011. It explores the complex relationships, issues of class, and perspectives of two women, Claire, a European-American composer in her 30s and mother of one son, and Lola, her immigrant nanny from the Philippines. Simpson at the National Book Festival in January 2014. Mona Jandali was born June 14, 1957 in Green Bay, Wisconsin to an Arab father from Syria and a Swiss-German American mother.

Women, Mothers and daughters, Female friendship. New York: Vintage Books. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; ctlibrary; americana. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Delaware County District Library (Ohio).

This novel is a journey through three women's lives. You want them to succeed, to make something of their lives despite their mixed beginnings

This novel is a journey through three women's lives. We travel with them as they make a life for themselves, despite the restrictions imposed by growing up in a small mid Western town where everyone knows their neighbours. Your sympathy and understanding are fully engaged. You want them to succeed, to make something of their lives despite their mixed beginnings. Reading this book is a positive experience, but tinged with sadness. Find similar books Profile.

In this flawless novella, Mona Simpson turns her powers of observation toward characters who, unlike Ann and Adele August in her bestselling Anywhere but Here, choose to stay rather than go. As a high school student in Green Bay, Bea Maxwell raised money for good causes; later, she became a successful real estate agent and an accomplished knitter.

From Anywhere But Here (a first novel that prompted Anne Tyler to proclaim, "She is already a master") to her most recent, A Regular Guy ("What a pleasure," observed Newsweek, "to see a successful novelist take a huge chance and fly high with it"), Mona Simpson has proven herself one of her generation's defining voices. With three books she has created a memorable cast of searchers who leave home in order to reinvent themselves, to find the missing parent or dream. But in this superb new novella, Simpson reveals the precise costs and rewards of staying—out of affinity and obligation, out of chance, circumstance, and choice.In Green Bay, Wisconsin—here vividly realized and imagined—Bea Maxwell comes of age in the fifties, and Off Keck Road follows her extended circle along the arc of their lives, through their frustrations and occasional successes, well toward old age. A story of family and friends, of change and many generations, it gathers itself around this remarkable woman, who discovers much about the world from her experience in the one place she has always belonged.Mesmerizing, compact, and intense, Off Keck Road reflects fully half a century of American life—and displays a writer at the maturity of her accomplishment.
User reviews
Gholbimand
This pithy novella by Mona Simpson is a story of what was, what is and what could have been. Taking place in Green Bay, Wisconsin in the '50s, '60s '70s and beyond, the story focuses on Bea Maxwell, who grew up in Green Bay, went away to college and then returned to never leave. Bea never marries at a time when marriage was the end-all goal for women. Her story is interwoven with that of other residents, some of whom are also not following the norm—a young woman who is living with polio, a divorced single mother and a real estate magnate who plays the drums. The plot, such as it is, is not riveting. The book will not keep you up at night to find out what happens next. But it is filled with wisdom and wit about the joy and sorrows of an ordinary life in an ordinary town, especially for those who are deemed a bit "different." And in this sense, it is brilliant.
Joni_Dep
I must say that the first 40 pages of this novella is *VERY CONFUSING*, numerous names just pour out without context.

In fact I gave up twice, both at about 40 pages. However it has only 167 pages and it seems a waste if I gave up at a quarter, so I pick it up a third time and finally read it through.

To be fair, the final pages are rather good, the language and tone is nicely detached, some scenes are moving. But it is so only after you know WHO are the true protagonists of this book, that's Bea and Shelly. This book is to depict their lonesome spinster lives. I like both stories of Bea and Shelly, both characters are memorable, especially Bea.

But would it be too late?? Not every reader is patient. After finish the book, I do not know why it is necessary to introduce so many names in the first pages. It is really frustrating that I tried to chart out the relations between them during my reading and failed. Even now, after I finish this book I still can not locate some of them correctly.

And, somebody please tells me, what is the difference between gramma and grandmother? In page 16, "her gramma and the grandmother... should do something together" and in page 38: "her grandmother died.... her gramma had a stroke". So are these two persons or the same one??

This is a good story and has very nice atmosphere --- once you know the main story line. But as said, it is very confusing at the beginning. Dear Simpson, if you read this review, please do not do that again!
Ddilonyne
What happens to the women who never marry, have children and live their lives in a path that strays from the "norm"? As a married woman with kids, I couldn't help being drawn into this book, into a life far different from mine - and possibly more intriguing because of the contrast. Bea is in college at the start of this book and her life moves through many transitions, possibilities, jobs, hurdles and friendships until she comes to rest back in Wisconsin, near-retirement. This isn't a book about "big" events as much as it is about personal discoveries, reflection and inner change.
Dont_Wory
Good company….I am elderly and live alone and for a while had some engaging friends. I read all of Mona Simpsons books and this one does not disappoint
Datrim
As a 63 year resident of the Green Bay area, I was reminded, vividly of all that I had forgotten about my childhood Mona does a superb job of getting her message to her readers.
IWAS
Great
Мох
A huge fan of Mona Simpson's writing in Anywhere but Here, I find her talent as a writer exceptional and her ability to portray the intricacies of human nature insightful and touching. I had high hopes for the short novella that lay between the adorable cover of Off Keck Road, and the front flap describing the story as a coming of age story, of friends and the ups and downs of a small town life. Off Keck Road left me somewhat disappointed.
The story centered around Bea, a woman who grew up in Green Bay, left for a short time during college and briefly after, returns to her home town where she cares for her mother and develops a career and niche for herself. We also get a brief glimpse into the life of Shelley, a Keck Road resident who struggles with a sense of identity in her family and experiments a bit with love and physicality with men. Perhaps I would have enjoyed the story more if I could have gotten closer to the characters, if we were more clued in with feelings, dreams, disappointments. Simpson touched the surface at times, but I never quite got a connection with them. At times the writing was choppy and the characters hard to keep track of. I went back and read it a second time and enjoyed it a bit more, but overall it left me with a sense that the story was not fully developed. I will still read more by Simpson, but would recommend Anywhere but Here.
As a huge fan of Mona Simpson's Anywhere but Here, I am sad to admit that I was disappointed with Off Keck Road. The cover is so pretty and the dust jacket description of a coming of age story in a small town set my expectations high.
In Off Keck Road we get the glimpse into two lives-those of Bea and Shelley. In Bea's life we see someone who grew up a child of wealth, who left small town life for a brief period, but ultimately returns to her home town, where she ends up caring for her mother until her final days. A successful career woman, Bea has mastered one area of her life, but found another area without nurturing, for Bea is alone. Shelley, on the other hand, has fallen into an odd working situation with an older man and seems to struggle more with her identity and what she is looking for in love. The characters are loosely tied by the men they love or have thought about loving, but the lines are fuzzy.
As new characters were introduced, I had a hard time of keeping track of who was who, and was left wanting to know more about the characters. I don't feel I ever got more than a tiny glimpse. I feel the story had promise, but never really took off. This will not prevent me from reading more by Simpson, however, as I adored Anywhere but Here and do believe that Simpson has true talent as a writer and story teller.