Free eBook Cassidy's Girl download

by David Goodis

Free eBook Cassidy's Girl download ISBN: 0679738517
Author: David Goodis
Publisher: Vintage; Reissue edition (January 8, 1992)
Language: English
Pages: 160
Category: Imaginative Literature
Subcategory: United States
Size MP3: 1152 mb
Size FLAC: 1219 mb
Rating: 4.8
Format: azw lrf azw txt


They say that a man needs a woman to go to hell with.

They say that a man needs a woman to go to hell with  .

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. They say that a man needs a woman to go to hell with. Cassidy had two. One was Mildred, the wife who kept him chained with ties of fear and jealousy and paralyzing sexual need.

David Goodis' novel, "Cassidy's Girl" offers a portrayal of lost people in forgotten streets of Philadelphia in the years following WW II. The characters in the story are tormented and fallen. They struggle with alcohol and with their own demons. I am familiar with parts of the Philadelphia that Goodis describes from the time I lived in the city years ago. But many of the places and scenes described in the book had already been lost. The primary character of the book Jim Cassidy, 36, drives a bus between Philadelphia and Easton for a cut-rate company with headquarters on Arch Street. Here is how Goodis introduces Cassidy and the theme of the book at the outset of the novel.

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The Wounded and the Slain. David Goodis: Five Noir Novels of the 1940s and '50s (Library of America). Read books for free from anywhere and from any device. Listen to books in audio format instead of reading.

David Loeb Goodis (March 2, 1917 – January 7, 1967) was an American writer of crime fiction noted for his output of short stories and novels in the noir fiction genre. Born in Philadelphia, Goodis alternately resided there and in New York City and Hollywood during his professional years.

Download books for free. Download (epub, 210 Kb). FB2 PDF MOBI TXT RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format. Cassidy's Girl has all the traits that made its author a virtuoso of the hard-boiled: a fiercely compelling ploy; characters who self-destruct in spectacularly unpredictable ways; and an insider's knowledge of all the routes to the bottom. Результаты поиска по книге. Отзывы - Написать отзыв. Пользовательский отзыв - datrappert - LibraryThing. This is a painful book to read.

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It was a kind of paralysis, as though he’d been hit on the skull with a sledge hammer, just hard enough to put him in a daze. The air became a tunnel of mist. He flinched gain he sensed the flashing of the signal light. But now it didn’t give a warning. Instead it offered the blunt message: Too late now, you’re in it up to your neck, there’s no way out. His lips moved mechanically. He told her to start the engine. And then, as the MG responded to the gas pedal, he watched the fading of the pastoral scene, the windshield framing a changing picture.

Cassidy’s Girl - David Goodis. To join our mailing list for new titles or for issues with our ngl. Text originally published in 1951 under the same title.

They say that a man needs a woman to go to hell with.  Cassidy had two.  One was Mildred, the wife who kept him chained with ties of fear and jealousy and paralyzing sexual need.  The other was Doris, a frail angel with a 100-proof halo and a bottle instead of a harp.  With those two, Cassidy found that the ride to hell could be twice as fast.Cassidy's Girl has all the traits that made its author a virtuoso of the hard-boiled: a fiercely compelling ploy; characters who self-destruct in spectacularly unpredictable ways; and an insider's knowledge of all the routes to the bottom.
User reviews
Kuve
David Goodis' novel, "Cassidy's Girl" offers a portrayal of lost people in forgotten streets of Philadelphia in the years following WW II. The characters in the story are tormented and fallen. They struggle with alcohol and with their own demons. Goodis portrays them rawly yet with sympathy. The book is as much about atmosphere as about character. The story is set in the bars, tenements, narrow streets of the old Delaware River harbor and waterfront. I am familiar with parts of the Philadelphia that Goodis describes from the time I lived in the city years ago. But many of the places and scenes described in the book had already been lost.

The primary character of the book Jim Cassidy, 36, drives a bus between Philadelphia and Easton for a cut-rate company with headquarters on Arch Street. Here is how Goodis introduces Cassidy and the theme of the book at the outset of the novel.

"The bus made a turn of Market Street, went up through the slashing rain to Arch, went into the depot. Cassidy climbed out, opened the door,stood there to help them down from the bus. He had the habit of studying their faces as they emerged, wondering what their thoughts were, and what their lives were made of. The old women and the girls, the frowning stout men with loose flesh hanging from their jaws, and the young men who gazed dully ahead as though seeing nothing. Cassidy looked at their faces and had an idea he could see the root of their trouble. It was the fact that they were ordinary people and they didn't know what real trouble was. He could tell them. He could damn well tell them."

Cassidy spends his evening fighting with his voluptuous but shrewish wife Mildred and drinking at a cheap establishment called Lundy's Place. Earlier in his life, Cassidy had flown planes in WW II and then commercially. When he was blamed falsely for a plane accident, Cassidy's life deteriorated. He squandered his money and ultimately found himself in the Philadelphia tenderloin. When he secures the job as a bus driver, Cassidy gains a small sense of purpose and control that he does not feel otherwise.

After a particularly harsh fight with his Mildred, Cassidy learns that she is interested in another patron of Lundy's Place, Haney Kendick. In his turn, Cassidy becomes involved with a young woman, Doris, 27, who is slender and withdrawn and an irredemable alcoholic. As the story develops, Goodis explores which of these women, Mildred or Doris, consitutes "Cassidy's Girl".

The book includes many scenes of violence, heavy drinking, sex, and tragedy. It is also highly introspective as each of the down and out characters has his or her own story. Cassidy is forced to flee when he is accused of causing an accident in driving the bus eerily similar to the accident years earlier with the plane. For all the rage and hopelessness of the characters and the setting, the book comes to a resolution that is slightly less hopeless than is the case in some of Goodis' later novels.

Beginning in 1951, Goodis (1917 -- 1967) published a number of paperback noir novels most of which are set in his native Philadelphia. The novels offer a noir portrayal of the city and of the loneliness of urban life. "Cassidy's Girl" sold over a million copies when it was published in 1951 but was soon forgotten. With the Library of America's recent publications of "Down There" (Shoot the Piano Player) Crime Novels: American Noir of the 1950s: The Killer Inside Me / The Talented Mr. Ripley / Pick-up / Down There / The Real Cool Killers (Library of America) (Vol 2) followed by its publication of a volume of five Goodis novels,David Goodis: Five Noir Novels of the 1940s and 50s (Library of America), Goodis dark world has achieved a place in American literature. Readers who come to Goodis through the Library of America volumes will enjoy exploring his other novels, including "Cassidy's Girl".

Robin Friedman
Mallador
Jim Cassidy is a loser.

His friends, who he doesn't hate, are losers.

His wife, Mildred, who he hates (the feeling is most-assuredly mutual), is too a loser. It would be a shame for Cassidy if she was his girl.

Cassidy spends his nights surrounded by losers at the local loser bar after his dead-end loser job as a bus driver. It hadn't always been this way for Cassidy. It wasn't always a one-way ticket to nowhere alongside the local drunks at the watering hole hovering above the Philadelphia docks.

It wasn't too long ago when Cassidy had it all. A former football hero turned World War II ace fighter pilot who settled into a great post war career as a commercial airline pilot. But then, as it goes in these tales (and pick you pun wherever you'd like coming up), Cassidy's world came down in a heap of flames, taking the rap for a plane crash that left a lot of people dead. The co-pilot suggested that Cassidy was flying drunk. Cassidy claimed otherwise. But hey, the damage was done and Cassidy's life was ruined and shortly thereafter Cassidy became a card-carrying lowlife.

The plot kicks off after another day on the job when all Cassidy wants when he comes home is a doting wife who has a meal ready to go for him. As far as Cassidy is concerned, it's the least she could do for him. Unfortunately, he married Mildred, who instead has left their place in shambles after an all day booze fest where they couldn't even have the damn decency to clean up the spilled booze and blood.

Cassidy decides he's had enough and that he's leaving Mildred and this life behind him. He puts all his hopes and dreams on a new face at the local bar, a plain, fading thin, world-class alcoholic named Doris. Perhaps Doris is Cassidy's Girl after all? Wouldn't that be nice? The two of them could start a new life together without Mildred and without the drink or Cassidy would be damned.

And as we know after reading enough noir, the poor bastard Cassidy is indeed damned. You punch the wrong fella in the bar... even if he is some fat slob who pines after Mildred (she's still his wife, even if she's a hated one) and everything goes downhill from there.

For awhile, the plot runs at a compelling breakneck pace as the proverbial noose tightens around Cassidy's neck. Sometimes the writing is too fast as feels more like a plot summary, but there are moments when Goodis slows down and really takes his time. One sequence in particular is a great example in which Cassidy, seeming on the verge of a clean getaway, imagines what his new life will be like. It's ultimately heart-breaking because you know it's never going to pan out that way for him. And I think Cassidy knows this too. Perhaps that's why he allows himself so much time to indulge in his fantasy life.

Unfortunately, a lot of the steam is let out as the final chapters unfold into an almost surreal, hyper-sexual, deus ex machina ending. It feels forced and rushed. but that's the case with a lot of the old pulp authors who cranked out work a rapid pace.

The dialogue is fun, but strays into the hokey more often than it should.

Flaws aside, Cassidy's Girl is a fun read from an author who doesn't always make the casual reader's list of must-read noir or pulp writers, but Goodis' work is worth the time, especially for fans of the genre.

Cassidy's Girl by David Goodis - 3 out of 5 Late Nights in the Secret Room at Bar for the Regulars Only
Datrim
This is a terrific paperback original from 1951 that was written by one of the real masters of noir fiction. Goodis' tale is squarely in the tradition of naturalism--all the characters are victims of circumstance. The atmosphere is charged with sex and violence. The plot involves an ill-fated love affair between a former football star and pilot, whose plane crashed through no fault of his and a woman who was smoking in bed and caused a house fire that killed her children. Both characters have become aimless alcoholics but both see the possibility of redemption in their love. But the pilot's obese wife shows up and tries to reel him back in until a group of barflies pull together to get justice for the pilot. The story is grim but the writing is top flight, the observations and insights on the human condition are right on the money and I would highly recommend this novel to anyone who has never read any of Goodis' work or anyone who is interested in the noir fiction of the late 1940s and early 1950s.
Jek
The writing has doldrums, but there are several bright moments, especially when the plot advances, that are delightful. Doldrums dominate a bit too much. A first person account of a drunkard in decline will become a drink catalog, for example.
Nenayally
Goodis novels for $0.99 each on Kindle are a bargain and a much better value than the recent Library of America volume. I read a study years ago that correlated various authors' alcoholism with the drinking habit of their characters. Goodis must have had well-used elbows by the time he wrote this one. It's a good, quick read set in a world where no one is sober for long. The characters are vivid and you know there isn't going to be much in the way of happy endings for them.