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Free eBook The Science Fiction Hall of Fame, Volume Two A: The Greatest Science Fiction Novellas of All Time Chosen by the Members of The Science Fiction Writers of America (SF Hall of Fame) download

by Ben Bova

Free eBook The Science Fiction Hall of Fame, Volume Two A: The Greatest Science Fiction Novellas of All Time Chosen by the Members of The Science Fiction Writers of America (SF Hall of Fame) download ISBN: 0765305348
Author: Ben Bova
Publisher: Tor Books; First Edition edition (December 1, 2004)
Language: English
Pages: 544
Category: Imaginative Literature
Subcategory: Short Stories and Anthologies
Size MP3: 1593 mb
Size FLAC: 1475 mb
Rating: 4.9
Format: lit azw mbr lrf


The Science Fiction Hall. has been added to your Cart. If you like science fiction and I do you'll love this book and all of the stories in it, some I haven't read since high school.

The Science Fiction Hall. Dr. Bova's writings have predicted the Space Race of the 1960s, virtual reality, human cloning, the Strategic Defense Initiative (Star Wars), electronic book publishing, and much more.

by Doubleday in 1973, distinguished as volumes "Two A" and "Two B". In the . they were published by Gollancz as Volume Two (1973) and Volume Three (1974). subtitle was The Greatest Science Fiction Novellas of All Time. Book 2 of 3 in the Science Fiction Hall of Fame Series. The SF Hall of Fame series was established to recognize quality SF writing before the era of the HUGO and NEBULA awards. What a wonderful gift to the early SF pioneers who were shamefully treated by the mainstream of creative writers.

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This volume is the definitive collection of the best science fiction novellas between 1929 to 1964 and contains eleven great classics. There is no better anthology that captures the birth of science fiction as a literary field

This volume is the definitive collection of the best science fiction novellas between 1929 to 1964 and contains eleven great classics. There is no better anthology that captures the birth of science fiction as a literary field. Published in 1973 to honor stories that had come before the institution of the Nebula Awards, The Science Fiction Hall of Fame introduced tens of This volume is the definitive collection of the best science fiction novellas between 1929 to 1964 and contains eleven great classics.

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Аудиокнига "The Science Fiction Hall of Fame, Vol. 2-A: The Greatest Science Fiction Novellas of All Time Chosen by the Members of The Science Fiction Writers of America", Poul Anderson, H. G. Wells, others. Читает Michael David Axtell, . . Читает Michael David Axtell, L. J. Ganser, Chris Andrew Ciulla, Mark Boyett, Graham Halstead, Oliver Wyman, Kevin T. Collins, Cary Hite, Josh Hurley, Tim Gerard Reynolds, Roger Clark, Fred Berman и various narrators. Мгновенный доступ к вашим любимым книгам без обязательной ежемесячной платы.

The authors chosen for The Science Fiction Hall Fame are the me.

The authors chosen for The Science Fiction of Hall Fame are the men . The definitive collection of the best in science fiction stories between 1929 and 1964. The book you now hold contains twenty-six of the greatest science fiction stories ever written.

The authors chosen for The Science Fiction of Hall Fame are the men and women who have shaped the body and heart of modern science fiction; their brilliantly imaginative creations continue to inspire and astound new generations of writers and fans. Country of the Kind," by Damon Knight, is a frightening portrayal of biological mutation.

The Science Fiction Hall of Fame, Volume Two A. In the selection process, SFWA members were asked to vote for ten out of the 76 stories on the ballot, selecting no more than one by any one author. by Doubleday in 1973, distinguished as volumes "Two A" and "Two B". they were published by Gollancz as Volume Two (1973) and. Volume Three (1974).

The Science Fiction Hall of Fame, Volume One, honored the best of science fiction's early short stories. This volume is the definitive collection of the best science fiction novellas written between 1929 to 1964 and contains eleven great classics. There is no better anthology that captures the birth of science fiction as a literary field.Published in 1973 to honor novellas that had come before the institution of the Nebula Awards, The Science Fiction Hall of Fame introduced tens of thousands of young readers to the wonders of science fiction and was a favorite of libraries across the country.This volume contains the following:Introduction by Ben Bova"Call Me Joe" by Poul Anderson"Who Goes There?" by John W. Campbell, Jr."Nerves" by Lester del Rey"Universe" by Robert A. Heinlein"The Marching Morons" by C. M. Kornbluth"Vintage Season" by Henry Kuttner and C. L. Moore". . . And Then There Were None" by Eric Frank Russell"The Ballad of Lost C'Mell" by Cordwainer Smith"Baby Is Three" by Theodore Sturgeon"The Time Machine" by H. G. Wells"With Folded Hands" by Jack Williamson
User reviews
Dynen
The SF Hall of Fame series was established to recognize quality SF writing before the era of the HUGO and NEBULA awards. What a wonderful gift to the early SF pioneers who were shamefully treated by the mainstream of creative writers. Of course, SF writers themselves changed these negative impressions by the higher literary standards achieved in the 1950s and beyond by such writers as Arthur C. Clarke, Ray Bradbury, Isaac Asimov, Roger Zelazny, Ursala Le Quin, Joanna Russ, Frank Herbert (I'm having fun proving my point with this list, which could go on and on . . . .). This first volume is framed by two stories of a journey to Mars: "A Martian Odyssey" from 1934 (I wanted to make a movie version with Jack Nicholson as the hero) and "A Rose for Ecclesiastes" from 1963 (I wanted to make a movie version with Jack Nicholson as the hero). In those intervening 29 years SF writing matured from Stanley Weinbaum's rather primitive pulp fiction to Roger Zelazny's stunning modernist prose. The first story is just an action fantasy, with little science and the most rudimentary fiction techniques. Still it's a great read! It has action, humor, suspense and one of the great alien characters in the whole genre, the bird-like and noble-hearted Martian, named Tweel. Trust me: once you meet Tweel you will never forget it (?). The later distinction between Hard SF and Soft SF did not yet exist and I doubt it would have mattered to Weinbaum, who was not a professional writer. However, three decades later, we have a very professional, and polished writer in Roger Zelazny, who had internalized the main currents of modern literature as his references to Hart Crane, Rainer Maria Rilke, the Mahabharata, Shakespeare, Rimbaud attest. You get the point. For Zelazny, goddamit, SF is literature and occupies its own niche in world literature. His main character is a poet, an anti-hero with illusions of heroism, a scoundrel and a brilliant, imaginative individual who single-handedly saves a dying civilization from imploding. And what does he get for his efforts. Nothing, no material rewards, no recognition. In this, he resembles the existentialist anti-hero of main stream fiction in the 1960s. And Zelazny's style is breathtaking: metaphorical, lyrical, sarcastic (even sardonic), allusive, persuasive and, beneath Gallinger's tough talk, deeply moving, even empathetic. And Zelazny knew he was writing Soft SF, so he could indulge his imagination in creating his version of a SF Mars and an alien race inhabiting it. The distinction between Hard and Soft forms of SF clarified the intentions of writers so that their readers did not misinterpret the results. This volume is contains a plethora of short masterpieces which together create a vivid primer in the varieties of SF.
Yar
This was a great read. The stories, practically without exception, were superlative SF: imaginative, clever and very well written. I even feel somewhat ... saddened ... to realize that many of the stories, and one in particular (from the mid-to-late 40's), were much, much better written than a lot of the work available today: I enjoyed everything immensely, but was amazed to discover this writer of nearly 70 years ago seemed to have a much better understanding of (and abilty to utilize) basic grammar, mathematics, and rudimentary scientific principles than do many of the "modern" authors I have read. Indeed, the capacity of readers to understand what many of these wonderful authors from long ago took for granted, could easily be described as "advanced" topics and concepts for many contemporary readers. I highly recommend this to fans of SF short stories. A few of the stories you may already know, but to me, they were even better on re-reading. Altogether, it's a wonderful anthology of many standout works and I am very glad I bought it.
Gianni_Giant
I first picked up the original printing of the first volume of thisanthology when I was a small child, around ten years old, and the first story in it ("A Martian Oddyssey") was so good that I put the book back down and didn't read the rest of it for another year because I was afraid none of the other stories in there could possibly be as good.

The second two volumes took me years to track down; II B I managed to find in a sale of discards from my school library; II A I didn't find at all until Amazon came along.

The conceit of this series is that the Science Fiction Writers of America picked the best short stories, novellas, and novels from before the Nebula Awards were commenced in 1965, and published them as a hall-of-fame anthology. Volume 1 collected the short stories and volume II (A and B) collected the novellas -- essentially, one stop volumes of all the "Nebula Emeritus" books, the sci-fi that professional SF writers of the sixties felt had most influenced and impacted them up to that point.

As such, this series is perfect for two groups of people: people who are completely ignorant of sci fi, and people who want to gain a better critical understanding of sci fi and its history as a genre. You can't find a better starting place, because these are the stories that the great modern SF writers started on, so by reading these, you'll understand more about what modern writers are doing, and you'll have the opportunity to experience the tropes first hand, from the stories that coined them, not in later knockoffs.

This volume (II A) I prefer slightly less than I and II B, if only because by the time I'd found it, I was older and had read some of the stories elsewhere and seen the tropes before, so it didn't have quite the same glow to it as the other two did, read in childhood; I also feel a couple of the stories in here aren't quite up to the same level as the rest. Still, there are some definite essentials -- "Universe" was the first generation-ship story, "Who Goes There?" is the source story for John Carpenter's film _The Thing_, The Marching Morons is an early version of the conceit in Idiocracy, etc.

Probably the best benefit of these volumes is that they'll give you a general familiarity with the big names of Golden Age SF, so that you'll know who you like and don't and whose works you want to find more of. If you're looking to expand your knowledge of Golden Age era SF, this series is an excellent place to start, and you'll probably find yourself tracking down most of the other works by most of these authors. I would, however, point you to Volume 1 first, especially if you're new to the genre.

This volume contains:

Call Me Joe by Poul Anderson
Who Goes There? by John W. Campbell Jr.
Nerves by Lester Del Rey
Universe by Robert A. Heinlein
The Marching Morons by C.M. Kornbluth
Vintage Season by Henry Kuttner and C. L. Moore
. . . And Then There Were None by Eric Frank Russell
The Ballad of Lost C'Mell by Cordwainer Smith
Baby is Three by Theodore Sturgeon
The Time Machine by H.G. Wells
With Folded Hands by Jack Williamson