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Free eBook Severance: Stories download

by Robert Olen Butler

Free eBook Severance: Stories download ISBN: 0811856143
Author: Robert Olen Butler
Publisher: Chronicle Books; First Edition edition (August 10, 2006)
Language: English
Pages: 264
Category: Imaginative Literature
Subcategory: Short Stories and Anthologies
Size MP3: 1137 mb
Size FLAC: 1205 mb
Rating: 4.1
Format: mobi lrf mbr doc


Robert Olen Butler (born January 20, 1945) is an American fiction writer. His short-story collection A Good Scent from a Strange Mountain was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for fiction in 1993.

Robert Olen Butler (born January 20, 1945) is an American fiction writer. Butler was born in Granite City, Illinois, to Robert Olen Butler S. an actor and theater professor who became the chairman of the theater department of Saint Louis University, and his wife, the former Lucille Frances Hall, an executive secretary.

Severance is a book in which the author has set a tough restriction on himself - each story-poem is to be exactly 240 words long . Butler has created an incredibly interesting portrayal of human life and death in one amazing book.

Severance is a book in which the author has set a tough restriction on himself - each story-poem is to be exactly 240 words long with the content reflecting the 90 seconds of thought between a head being severed and the lost of consciousness. There is no end of sentence punctuation - a technique that helps provide a sense of urgency, confusion, prattling.

Robert Olen Butler (Author). Butler moves from death monologues (Severance) to little death monologues in this provocative collection of brief pieces that imagine what goes on in the minds of copulating couples.

In a heightened state of emotion, people speak at the rate of 160 words per minute.

Robert Olen Butler teaches at Florida State University. Chronicle Books, 2006. Библиографические данные. Владелец оригинала: Калифорнийский университет.

Robert Olen Butler has published twelve novels-The Alleys of Eden, Sun Dogs, Countrymen of Bones, On Distant Ground, Wabash, The Deuce, They Whisper, The Deep Green Sea, Mr. Spaceman, Fair Warning, Hell and (forthcoming this August) A Small Hotel-and six volumes of short fiction-Tabloid Dreams, Had a Good Time, Severance, Intercourse, Weegee Stories, and A Good Scent from a Strange. Mountain, which won the 1993 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction.

Читать онлайн - Butler Robert Olen. A Good Scent from a Strange Mountain: Stories Электронная библиотека e-libra. ru Читать онлайн A Good Scent from a Strange Mountain: Stories. Robert Olen Butler A Good Scent from a Strange Mountain: Stories FOR JOHN WOOD A GOOD SCENT FROM A STRANGE MOUNTAIN OPEN ARMS I have no hatred in me. I’m almost certain of that. I fought for my country long enough to lose my wife to another man, a cripple. This was because even though I was alive, I was dead to her, being far away

Severance, the latest from FC2 board member Robert Olen Butler, follows in what can fairly be called his "tradition" of. .Severance, published first in French last year as Mots de tete, draws inspiration from what the book jacket calls "two seemingly unrelated facts.

Severance, the latest from FC2 board member Robert Olen Butler, follows in what can fairly be called his "tradition" of thematically-driven short story collections. A Good Scent from a Strange Mountain, fifteen stories exploring the experiences of living in New Orleans, won him the Pulitzer Prize in 1993.

The volume as a whole runs to 15 times that length.

by. Robert Olen Butler. American Novel And Short Story, Fiction, Fiction - General, General, Fiction, Short Stories (single author), Short Stories (single author), Short stories. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

The human head is believed to remain in a state of consciousness for one and one-half minutes after decapitation. In a heightened state of emotion, people speak at the rate of 160 words per minute. Inspired by the intersection of these two seemingly unrelated concepts, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Robert Olen Butler wrote sixty-two stories, each exactly 240 words in length, capturing the flow of thoughts and feelings that go through a person's mind after their head has been severed. The characters are both real and imagined Medusa (beheaded by Perseus, 2000 BC), Anne Boleyn (beheaded at the behest of Henry VIII, 1536), a chicken (beheaded for Sunday dinner, Alabama, 1958), and the author (decapitated, on the job, 2008). Told with the intensity of a poet and the wit of a great storyteller, these final thoughts illuminate and crystallize more about the characters' own lives and the worlds they inhabit than many writers manage to convey in full-length biographies or novels. The stories, which have appeared in literary magazines across the country, are a delightful and intriguing creative feat from one of today's most inventive writers.
User reviews
porosh
Imagine that you have about 90 seconds to remain conscious after your head is severed. This book of prose (62 stories, 250 words each) is based on a 19th century French doctor’s opinion that the head remains conscious for 90 seconds after decapitation. And, if it’s true that we speak at a rate of 160 words per minute during heightened states of emotion, then you might have a lot to think about in these last 90 seconds before all the blood drains from your brain. This book requires a slow and thoughtful read about the men and women in history and present day who were beheaded or decapitated. Butler does some exceptional creative writing here if not outright chilling images and emotions. I found the last few lines of most of the stories to be highly dramatic and meaningful, providing real insight to these characters’ lives (Medusa, Paul the apostle, Lady Jane Grey, Sir Walter Raleigh, Thomas More) One especially, “Angry Eyes” an Apache warrior’s last 90 seconds was so impressive I had to put down the book.
One thing has left me wondering about this premise of 90 seconds of consciousness claimed by Dr. Dassy D’Estaing (1883). Who is this doctor? I could find nothing online about D’Estaing and this theory or how he came to his conclusion. If anyone here can confirm valid information about D’Estaing, please post. That said, this extraordinary little adventure into the last thoughts of the newly dead has a sense of absurd beauty.
Fenius
I misunderstood the nature of this book. While expecting more "true to life" (or, I should say, true to death!) experiences, it is more meditative and poetical. I cannot judge the writer; I can only judge my error in purchasing it.
Usaxma
How to make decapitation funny.
Dellevar
Amazing
BORZOTA
imaginative and poetic writing. a real tour-de-force.
Chi
Very cool book.
Chankane
Severance is a book in which the author has set a tough restriction on himself - each story-poem is to be exactly 240 words long with the content reflecting the 90 seconds of thought between a head being severed and the lost of consciousness. There is no end of sentence punctuation - a technique that helps provide a sense of urgency / confusion / prattling. While the book itself labels the pieces "stories" I would label many of them as prose poems because the language itself moves to the foreground.

From Chin Chin Chan beheaded for "maintaining a romatic correspondence with an American girl ...": "moon no longer a blossom a pearl a lantern in a lover's door but a bodiless face, mine, in a train window, she on the platform trying not to look at me directly, as if she were there for someone selse, and the train hurtles in the dark and I stare into the stars and not even a poet could find the moon in this sky no even Li Po in a boat with quill and ink ..." Wonderful.

However, some story/poems I had trouble linking to the individual speaking because I knew too little about their lives to make the pieces fit. It was not the the characters were too obscure; rather that the pieces (rightly) focused on parts of their lives not taught in history books. Given the author's ability to provide sufficient background in many entries, this is not a failure of the form but a failure either of the reader or author. Labeling them prose poems would warn the reader that this stories require the close reading given poems not the casual reading often given prose.
Butler has created an incredibly interesting portrayal of human life and death in one amazing book. The book is based on the premise of Dr. Dassy D'Estaing in 1883 that after decapitation, the human mind remains conscious for 1 ½ minutes. In addition, people speak at approximately 160 words a minutes when in a heightened state of emotion.

Based on these premises, Butler creates a series of stories that represent the thoughts of real people who have been decapitated and their thoughts in the 90 seconds following that decapitation. These people are in fact real people who had been decapitated. Most of them were decapitated via the guillotine. Some of the people Butler portrays in the book are as follows: Marie Antoinette, King Louis the XVI, Jayne Mansfield, John the Baptist, The Apostle Paul, Sir Thomas More, Lady Jane Grey, Anne Boleyn, Mary Queen of Scots, Robespierre, Robert Kornbluth, Nicole Brown Simpson and many more.

Each story is exactly 240 words; representing the amount of words that would be spoken in 90 seconds, post decapitation. The stories are in essence the distillation of an entire lifetime, through the eyes of the deceased person. The elements of their life that are of significance to the victim are presented by Butler to the reader.

The book is experimental in its form. And the creation of the stories and their content are uniquely fascinating. Butler has in fact created a truly brilliant concept in this book. The people are mostly recognizable by name, but also Butler gives a very brief comment on each one of them indicating who they were. The book is highly recommended for readers who enjoy unusual and expertly written short stories with a surreal content that tickles the imagination. Severance is truly a cerebral experience for those readers who wish to be intrigued by what might flash before a person's eyes upon the knowledge that their death is imminent.