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Free eBook Bad Dirt: Wyoming Stories 2 download

by Annie Proulx

Free eBook Bad Dirt: Wyoming Stories 2 download ISBN: 0743257995
Author: Annie Proulx
Publisher: Scribner; 1st edition (November 30, 2004)
Language: English
Pages: 240
Category: Imaginative Literature
Subcategory: Short Stories and Anthologies
Size MP3: 1273 mb
Size FLAC: 1207 mb
Rating: 4.7
Format: mbr lit mbr mobi


Bad Dirt: Wyoming Stories 2 is a collection of short stories by Annie Proulx published in 2004. It was not as well received by critics in comparison with Proulx's 1999 Close Range: Wyoming Stories.

Bad Dirt: Wyoming Stories 2 is a collection of short stories by Annie Proulx published in 2004. The collection consists of eleven stories, all set in Wyoming; Proulx moved to the state in the 1990s. Five of the eleven stories are set in the fictional Wyoming town of "Elk Tooth", a town of 80 inhabitants in which each individual "tries to be a character and with some success

Most of the stories are standard Proulx fare; evocative, timely and unique

Only 17 left in stock (more on the way). Most of the stories are standard Proulx fare; evocative, timely and unique. I was particularly drawn to the final novelete, "Tits Up in a Ditch" because it covered the most ground and encompassed 3 generations of the Listers, a ranch family of lower economics and backward ways, making them both embarrassing and endearing.

Annie Proulx follows the success of Close Range with another remarkable collection of stories. Bad Dirt is filled with the vivid characters for which Proulx has become known. In 'The Contest,' the male population of Elk Tooth, Wyoming, vows to put aside their razors for two seasons, ante up ten dollars each, and wait to see who has the longest beard on July 4. Deb Sipple, the moving protagonist of 'That Trickle-Down Effect,' finds that his opportunism-and his smoking habit-lead to a massive destruction.

Bad dirt : Wyoming stories 2/Annie Proulx

Bad dirt : Wyoming stories 2/Annie Proulx. p. cm. Contents: The hellhole-The Indian Wars refought-The trickle down effect- What kind of furniture would Jesus pick?-The old badger game- Man crawling out of trees-The contest-The Wamsutter wolf- Summer of the hot tubs-Dump junk-Florida rental. Wyoming-Social life and customs-Fiction.

Pulitzer Prize-winning author Annie Proulx follows the success of Close Range with another remarkable collection of short stories set in Wyoming. Bad Dirt is filled with the vivid and willful characters for which Proulx has become known. In ‘The Contest’, the men of Elk Tooth, Wyoming, vow to put aside their razors for two seasons and wait to see who has the longest beard come the 4th of July

Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Bad Dirt: Wyoming Stories 2". .

Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Bad Dirt: Wyoming Stories 2" для чтения в офлайн-режиме. Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award winner Annie Proulx returns with another stellar collection of short stories bound to be even more successful than her bestselling, critically acclaimed Close Range. Annie Proulx’s new collection is peopled by characters who struggle with circumstances beyond their control.

Bad Dirt: Wyoming Stories 2. 217 printed pages. Pulitzer Prize-winning author Annie Proulx follows the success of Close Range with another remarkable collection of short stories set in Wyoming. In ‘The Contest’, the men of Elk Tooth, Wyoming, vow to put aside their razors for two seasons and wait to see who has the longest beard come the 4th of July.

Bad Dirt Wyoming Stories 2 book. Bad Dirt: Wyoming Stories II by Annie Proulx (Scribner 2005) (81. 4). This is the second of Annie Proulx's fine collections of short stories. The setting is Miami  . These are set in the West; three of these stories in this volume are set in the tiny town of Elk Tooth, Wyoming. Annie Proulx only writes the good stuff!

The stories in Annie Proulx's new collection are peopled by characters who struggle with circumstances beyond their control in a kind of rural noir half-light.

The stories in Annie Proulx's new collection are peopled by characters who struggle with circumstances beyond their control in a kind of rural noir half-light. Trouble comes at them from unexpected angles, and they will themselves through it, hardheaded and resourceful. Bound by the land and by custom, they inhabit worlds that are often isolated, dangerous, and in Proulx's bold prose, stunningly vivid. The stories in Annie Proulx's new collection are peopled by characters who struggle with circumstances beyond their control in a kind of rural noir half-light.

A new anthology of short fiction by the Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award-winning author features an array of stories, all set in Wyoming, that feature colorful, eccentric, and moving characters who have a profound effect on the people around them, in such tales as "The Trickle Down Effect," "The Contest", and "What Kind of Furniture Would Jesus Pick?" 125,000 first printing.
User reviews
Phobism
Proulx's "Bad Dirt" captures the size, dryness and dust-blown reality of the Wyoming setting and throws a range of modern-day characters into the scene, complete with (her signature) odd names and even odder behavior. There are good guys and bad guys, heroes and protagonists. And in case the reader gets bored with things, she throws in a few fables to keep things interesting - something I had not seen in previous work.

While this book is not as realistic as the first in the trilogy, it makes up for that fact with more colorful writing and more desperate situations. I was reminded of Proulx's "Postcards" in many of the stories, the writing has that same isolated, haunting tone. Proulx knows what it's like to live on a wind-blown prairie or a rocky scrub. She also reads human behavior well and is a keen observer. Taking both of these ingredients and carefully paring them down to their most salient elements is what she does best. The writing is spare and the dialogue even more so.

One can't help but also sense of Proulx's own personality, dislikes and likes. Careful reading between the lines shows that while she respects many Wyoming residents' livelihood and history, she also knows it may be best to keep them at an arm's length. Her penchant for wacky names, laundry lists and spare dialogue show a peculiar - if not interesting - take on life and it's one that this reviewer finds intriguing enough to come back for more.

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(The following review is for "Just Fine the Way It Is", the last of the three Wyoming Stories. Amazon will not allow my review to appear on the actual product page, stating I bought them as a set and cannot review them separately, even though this is not the case, I bought each as a separate purchase)

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While still excellent writing, of the three books which make up the series "Wyoming Stories", this is easily the least cohesive and suffers from a few Twain-esque additions which mark an odd departure from the whole.

Most of the stories are standard Proulx fare; evocative, timely and unique. I was particularly drawn to the final novelete, "Tits Up in a Ditch" because it covered the most ground and encompassed 3 generations of the Listers, a ranch family of lower economics and backward ways, making them both embarrassing and endearing. Another gem is "Testimony of the Donkey", which reveals the writer's own pith through the character of Catlin, a fiercely independent, modern boheme, who shows us that independent traits can be both rewarding and deadly.

When Proulx stumbles, she does so with flair. "I've Always Loved This Place" and "Swamp Mischief" are both stories featuring the Devil, and - while interesting and slightly humorous to read - are both polished coal in an otherwise unique collection of fine stones. They're good efforts, but Mark Twain she ain't. As well, "Deep-Blood-Greasy-Bowl" lopes in to paleo-historic territory and diverges into a writing meter that didn't hold my interest as well as Proulx's familiar, homespun style. When I buy Proulx, I expect Proulx.

These low points don't exactly ruin the whole, but they dent a good fender on the vehicle which Proulx drives beautifully around her beloved state of Wyoming.
Dammy
This volume of stories about Wyoming contains four fully developed, character-driven short stories interspersed with what feels like seven thinly disguised local anecdotes. Yet in both kinds of stories Proulx demonstrates a Faulkner-like skill at portraying agrarian locals coming head-to-head with modernity. The final (anecdotal) story, "Florida Rental", especially reminded me of Faulkner's "Spotted Horses" sequence from The Snopes Trilogy. And like Faulkner, Proulx seems to have an underlying affection (or at least respect) for all her characters, even the ones she seems to enjoy skewering.

The substantial stories that I enjoyed are: "The Indian Wars Refaught" about a troubled young Sioux woman who reconnects with her sense of identity while sorting archival material related to the battle of Wounded Knee; "What Kind of Furniture Would Jesus Pick?," about one Wyoming rancher's decline in the face of changing times, a failed marriage, and sons who've gone their own ways; "Man Crawling Out of Trees" about an elderly couple who moved to Wyoming from the East and how each of them responds in radically different ways to the rugged terrain, taciturn populace, and sense of isolation; "The Wamsutter Wolf" in which the human characters are eerily shown to behave according to wolf pack mores. Of all the stories, these four come closest to matching the standard Proulx set for herself with "Brokeback Mountain." Also worth mentioning here is "Dump Junk," a story that interestingly moves beyond Proulx's very grounded sense of reality into the realm of fantasy.

All in all, this is a pretty satisfying collection of stories.
Jark
The whole 20th century of Wyoming is pulled upon various ways in these stories.sometimes it is difficult to separate the ranching, mining and tourism periods as well as the strongly drawn characters from each other. The author allows them all their idiosynchrocies and prejudices without imposing any of her own unlike say someone like Hemingway.
Lli
They say that every writer speaks best from a particular place and time, and Annie Proulx certainly has a brilliant flair for the Wyoming expanse, the joys and hardships of contemporary ranching life, and the tone perfect characterizations of the men and women who live there.

If you want captivated reading, then buy her books of wyoming short stories. You will not be dissapointed.
It's so easy
A further collection of evocative, beautifully written Wyoming stories about a harsh and brutal land of blizzards and droughts and the eccentric individuals trying to hang onto a ranching life that is no longer viable.
Coron
This book has hilarious short stories that totally capture the way of life out here in the REAL West.. Annie must live the life and know the characters personally to have created such rich little stories about people I swear I know. I live in a small town in Idaho and I've long thought about writing about the characters around here, but I didn't think anyone would believe me. She even slips in a tall tale or two which you are suckered into for a few pages before you realize, no.... wait..... that can't be, even though it's a nice thought! I've shared this book with my whole family and they love it too.
Original
This author writes with a depth of knowledge of her locality. You find yourself unable to put the book down, and the biggest disappointment is reaching the end, and wishing there was more. Annie Proulx knows human nature, and is not afraid to delve between the shiny surfaces and pull out the grimy undercurrent which motivates her characters. A must read for real escapism!
As I expect from Proulx, a collection of unforgettable stories. She is a master teller and Wyoming, with all its warts and strange people, comes alive as few places I can imagine. For a good read, this volume can't be beat.