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Free eBook Urban Nature: Poems About Wildlife in the City download

by Emily Hiestand,Laure-Anne Bosselaar

Free eBook Urban Nature: Poems About Wildlife in the City download ISBN: 1571314105
Author: Emily Hiestand,Laure-Anne Bosselaar
Publisher: Milkweed Editions; 1st edition (June 27, 2000)
Language: English
Pages: 272
Category: Imaginative Literature
Subcategory: Poetry
Size MP3: 1362 mb
Size FLAC: 1392 mb
Rating: 4.4
Format: lrf mbr lrf docx


Start by marking Urban Nature: Poems About Wildlife in the City as Want to Read: Want to Read saving.

Deep in the concrete canyons of even the largest cities, nature lurks. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Urban Nature: Poems About Wildlife in the City as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Having always mused over the matter of why so many poets write poems about nature when most modern poets live in cities (or at least in non-rural settings), it was refreshing to discover this book. It is a strong collection of poets mostly wrtiing in their voices about their experiences (most importantly) as we suspect they truly are.

by Laure-Anne Bosselaar and Emily Hiestand.

book by Emily Hiestand. Deep in the concrete canyons of even the largest cities, nature lurks. by Laure-Anne Bosselaar and Emily Hiestand. With poems from more than 130 emerging poets, this book celebrates the nature found firmly ensconced in the urban jungles, from salamanders to horses.

Bosselaar, Laure-Anne, 1943-. Books for People with Print Disabilities.

Urban Nature: Poems About Wildlife in the City. Angela the upside down girl, and other domestic travels. Angela the Upside-Down Girl.

About her work, the poet Charles Simic has said, "Laure-Anne Bosselaar understands the complexities and the endless contradictions of our contemporary.

Popular Nature poems by famous poets including Robert Frost, Emily Dickinson, Rudyard Kipling and John Keats. The power, ingenuity, and sheer beauty found in nature has always fascinated mankind. The power, ingenuity, and sheer beauty found in nature have inspired poets for centuries. Popular outdoor poems and creative poetry about nature are good for the body and soul. When we look at powerful ocean waves rolling in, we cannot help but feel small and powerless in comparison. Mighty trees in a vast forest inspire feelings of insignificance and awe.

It shows the grandeur of nature and how many different things it encompasses.

Emily Dickinson (10 December 1830 – 15 May 1886, Amherst, Massachusetts). It shows the grandeur of nature and how many different things it encompasses. Hau Yu CHU (6/5/2019 9:52:00 AM). this is awomemiciaje M name is HUA UC HCUHUCHCHUCHUCHUCC (Report) Reply.

One more recommendation, of a book by a card-carrying teacher of science but an unabashed devotee of poetry, as well.

This collection is at once broader and more sharply-focused. As Emily Hiestand observes, in a lucid and informed prefatory essay to the volume, "Ideas about nature are famously malleable. The word 'nature' can mean 'everything that is,'. Just as often 'nature' is used in contradistinction to 'culture. One more recommendation, of a book by a card-carrying teacher of science but an unabashed devotee of poetry, as well.

Urban Nature: Poems About Wildlife in the City by Laure-Anne Bosselaar Susan Hanson. 115. Song of the World Becoming: New and Collected Poems, 1981-2001 by Pattiann Rogers Courtney O’Banion. 117. Quincie Boliver by Mary King Dickie Maurice Heaberlin. 119. Ostrich by Michael A. Thomas Valarie Hall. 120. Sofía’s Saints by Diana López Stacey Swann.

With poems from more than 130 emerging poets, this book celebrates the nature found firmly ensconced in the urban jungles, from salamanders to horses. Original.
User reviews
Aria
Interesting idea for a collection, but not many really good poems.
Cordanius
Having always mused over the matter of why so many poets write poems about nature when most modern poets live in cities (or at least in non-rural settings), it was refreshing to discover this book. It is a strong collection of poets mostly wrtiing in their voices about their experiences (most importantly) as we suspect they truly are. A collection like this also allows for the inclusion of some creatures that don't always get their just due in nature poetry, like roaches, or old stand-bys in new allocations (like horses pulling collection wagons or in the city zoo...you get the idea).

A strong collection with a nice breadth of styles and voices, and a fair sense of humor bubbling just beneath the surface. Highly recommended, especially if you think all poetry these days is either loud and political or soft and pastorale navel-gazing.
Morad
Have you ever had the urge, while waiting for a traffic signal, to get out of your car for a better look at a flock of starlings veering and banking in tandem against an early evening pink November sky? If so, you might enjoy this collection of poems. Nature exists even in our cities, and this anthology is for the most part a celebration of that fact. Although many of the poems lament our failure to better accommodate nature in our urban environments, a larger number seem inspired by the natural beauty that can still be found there if we only pause to notice. There are over 150 selections all together, some from new poets, others from known poets, all reflecting upon some aspect of urban nature, from geraniums in the office (they smell like shovels) to a salamander in the video store parking lot.
My approach to this anthology was to slowly peruse the pages, searching not for a whole poem that I immediately love - those are always rare - but for an evocative phrase, an image, sound or metaphor that stirred me enough to beg my return. With apologies for not mentioning any names, let me splice together a few examples to capture the flavor. Here's an earthmover parked across a vacant field from a sycamore whose bark curls like site maps and blueprints unrolled in a distant room, a million frogs shrieking like background music for the big bang, falling magnolia petals, the smell of road kill or fresh baked bread and beer brewing as the morning swells with promise.
The second time through I recognized some places where I'd been before but realized that I had overlooked some good ones such as the horse with the colossal nostrils, squirrels embracing their way up a tree, a national convention of republican cockroaches in the kitchen at night, azaleas confused by the bright lights installed after a burglary. There are poems about seasons: a snow plow shoves aside the early morning quiet, people laughing and shoveling together, butts of mother nature's joke; spring grass is what the earth sang; summer nights sleeping on the porch, crickets; fallen leaves flat-plastered on a wet sidewalk, bring in the houseplants - nature is most seductive when about to die.
There is a pleasing sparsity of poems about dogs and cats but birds are frequently featured, bad birds, uninvited, that swarm in and unpack right on private property, and good birds - a brave sparrow whose heart is smaller than a heart should be, a cardinal, its throat abounding with information, swans eating out of hands, an egret fishing in the feculent marsh, a thrush, its song a small aggression taken for joy. A whirlwind of chittering chimney swifts funnels down to roost, a pileated woodpecker ratchets around tree trunks, the scream of a redtail hawk strips varnish from the heart.
As might be expected pigeons are popular, waddling cheek by jowl among the bag ladies, their low voltage moans, their necks scarved with liquid green rainbows, beaks evolved for gutter cracks and handouts, investigating the wonders of gum. This book is not just about literary cities like NY, SF and LA but also about Chicago, Detroit, Phoenix, St Louis, Duluth and others - how they are and how they used to be. Its about animals and dreams, childhood memories of growing-up places in a time when urban nature was less of an oxymoron, before so much of it had been squeezed out. Its about pollution (even the snowflakes stink), empty lots and potholes (earth breathing through the streets), about escaping to the park, the zoo, the botanical garden, the college campus or the outskirts of town, or merely looking out the window like that couple that made love in the afternoon thirty stories up, then watched a peregrine swoop past their room as if delivering a message from the gods.
After several readings I had connected on a personal level with many of the poems, discovered some poets that I want to read more of, and learned that in some ways, nature is even more poignant when projected against a cityscape.
Note: this review also appeared in the Autubon Naturalist News, Feb 2001