Free eBook The Pupil download

by W.S. Merwin

Free eBook The Pupil download ISBN: 037541276X
Author: W.S. Merwin
Publisher: Knopf; 1 edition (October 30, 2001)
Language: English
Pages: 112
Category: Imaginative Literature
Subcategory: Poetry
Size MP3: 1267 mb
Size FLAC: 1803 mb
Rating: 4.2
Format: lrf docx mobi azw


William Stanley Merwin (September 30, 1927 – March 15, 2019) was an American poet who wrote more than fifty books of poetry and prose, and produced many works in translation.

William Stanley Merwin (September 30, 1927 – March 15, 2019) was an American poet who wrote more than fifty books of poetry and prose, and produced many works in translation. During the 1960s anti-war movement, Merwin's unique craft was thematically characterized by indirect, unpunctuated narration. In the 1980s and 1990s, his writing influence derived from an interest in Buddhist philosophy and deep ecology

Merwin’s next books were some of his most critically acclaimed and continue to be influential volumes. Merwin has always been concerned with the relationship between morality and aesthetics, weighing both terms equally.

Merwin’s next books were some of his most critically acclaimed and continue to be influential volumes. The Lice (1967), often read as a response to the Vietnam War, also condemns modern man in apocalyptic and visionary terms. These are poems not written to an agenda but that create an agenda, wrote poet and critic Reginald Shepherd, preserving and recreating the world in passionate words. His poems speak back to the fallen world not as tracts but as artistic events.

The Pupil Merwin, . The Pupil, Merwin, . Варианты приобретения. Кол-во: о цене Наличие: Отсутствует. Возможна поставка под заказ. При оформлении заказа до: 10 дек 2019 Ориентировочная дата поставки: начало Февраля При условии наличия книги у поставщика.

All of those poetry lovers who have followed the career and poetic development of . Merwin will want this collection of his works

All of those poetry lovers who have followed the career and poetic development of . Merwin will want this collection of his works. It is interesting to go back to the earliest poems and note the ways his poetry has changed and yet remained the same in spirit. I opened one volume just before a long overseas trip and copied the first poem I read so that I would have it with me.

We’re dedicated to reader privacy so we never track you.

Merwin attended Princeton University on a scholarship, where he was a classmate of Galway Kinnell, and studied poetry . Merwin's first collection, A Mask for Janus (Yale University Press, 1952), was selected by W. H. Auden for the Yale Series of Younger Poets.

Merwin attended Princeton University on a scholarship, where he was a classmate of Galway Kinnell, and studied poetry with the critic R. P. Blackmur, and his teaching assistant, John Berryman.

Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem.

Merwin Best Merwin yet. Published by Thriftbooks.

Best Merwin yet.

S. Merwin was born in New York City in 1927 and grew up in Union City, New Jersey, and in Scranton, Pennsylvania. From 1949 to 1951 he worked as a tutor in France, Portugal, and Majorca. He has since lived in many parts of the world, most recently on Maui in the Hawaiian Islands. He has since lived in many parts of the world, most recently on Maui in the Hawaiian Islands

Online library archive for easy reading any ebook for free anywhere right on the internet. Listen to books in audio format. In 1948, twenty-one, already married and graduated from Princeton, W. S. Merwin made his first trip abroad.

Online library archive for easy reading any ebook for free anywhere right on the internet. Travel from America to Europe became a commonplace, an ordinary commodity, some time ago, but when I first went such departure was still surrounded with an atmosphere of adventure and improvisation, and my youth and inexperience and my all but complete lack of money heightened that vertiginous sensation. Thus begins his most recent memoir, Summer Doorways.

Hailed by Peter Davison in the Boston Sunday Globe as a poet who “engages the underground stream of our lives at depths that only two or three living poets can match,” W. S. Merwin now gives us The Pupil, a volume of astonishing range and extraordinary beauty: a major literary event.These are poems of great lyrical intensity, concerned with darkness and light, with the seasons, and with the passing of time across landscapes that are both vast and minutely imagined. They capture the spiritual anguish of our time; the bittersweet joys of vanishing wilderness; anger at our political wrong- doings; the sensuality that memory can engender. Here are remembrances of the poet’s youth, lyrics on the loss of loved ones, echoes from the surfaces of the natural world. Here, too, is the poet’s sense of a larger mystery:. . . we knowfrom the beginning that the darknessis beyond us there is no explainingthe dark it is only the lightthat we keep feeling a need to account for—from “The Marfa Lights”Passionate, rigorous, and quietly profound, The Pupil is an essential addition to the canon of contemporary American poetry—a book that finds W. S. Merwin’s singularly resonant voice at the height of its power.
User reviews
Tisicai
The Pupil does for the brief, meditative lyric what Merwin's Travels did for the elegy and The Folding Cliffs for the historical narrative, and that is to live as perhaps the only examples of those forms to attain the stature of greatness and beauty in the last 25 years. I hope they presage a new possibility in verse, but I don't know of another living poet writing even close to this well out of a faith in the transparency of the word, except maybe some late Creeley. I don't mean this to say that Merwin is dated, more that it must somehow still be possible, since he does it, to write referential poetry and poetry with clearly stated ideas in it without being boring. He often seeems to me like a rarified, or purified, ghost of what used to be considered human to human communication, alive somehow in a space we more remember than encounter, where there were transpersonal signifiers that allowed us to understand something of each other even as we slip away from the understanding and from each other. The poems themselves sometimes function as an elegy for this belief, but I hope it's premature, not eulogy. That said, I find it difficult to write about Merwin, in that his poems seem to mean exactly what they say, to float ethereal and wraithlike in the mind's capaciousness, a loveliness one fears to touch or think about. You can't read these poems if you're nervous, or looking to find impressive things to say about them, or enter Derridean chains of substitution, and in that regard, they become so transparent, so self-evident, as to enter their opposite and become as opaque as reflecting onyx. As much as I hate to say so, they hint toward the belief, normally misguided, that poetry this beautiful has to come from a spiritually realized person. I'd rather just consent to the idea that the defining lines of The Pupil are from the Marfa Lights, about how it is the light, not the darkness, that everyone feels the need to explain, and so here is a collection of poems of darkness like that, the darkness glimpsed in a just opened mouth, the word spoken as music and its reference as perhaps a shadow music in near perfect unison. The only poems that seem to handle this kind of writing this well are Rexroth's meandering mountain and river poems of cloud and light (only with a deeper and quieter engagement with human transiency), and what I'm able to imagine of the great Sung and Tang Chinese masters through the layers of sensibilities, translations and my dictionary Chinese. When reading these poems one is brought into a quiet center, or shadow or seam, between sorrow and beauty that exists through these expressions but cannot be expressed. This poetry is exquisite. I'd strongly recommend you buy it, calm down, and let it work its magic.
Nettale
Although I have read, and very much enjoyed, several books of W.S. Merwin's prose, THE PUPIL is my first experience of his poetry, other than an isolated poem in a magazine or journal. It does not persuade me that he is as fine a poet as he is an essayist, but my mind is still open to the possibility. In other words, I intend to read another collection of his poetry, which, I suppose, is a compliment to this one.

THE PUPIL contains seventy-eight poems. Most are relatively short and are contained on a single page. Only three stretch to three pages. The lines do not rhyme, nor do they employ an obvious meter or rhythm. They are written with plain, simple words. They flow from line to line, and sentence to sentence or thought to thought, without punctuation or, for the most part, capitalization, all of which can at times be mildly disorienting. The last fifteen or so poems are a little different in style - sparer and more cryptic.

In general, the poems are contemplative. Some deal with ideas best characterized as metaphysical; others deal with matters personal to Merwin, both friends and experiences from his life. Many are elegiac in nature. It is a book of poetry from an older man (and now, twelve years after publication, Merwin is an even older - and still active -- eighty-five). "The Pupil", I take it, is a pupil of life.

For me, the strongest, or the most affecting, poems were in the middle of the volume. Perhaps that was a function of my getting growing accustomed to Merwin's style (before the somewhat different concluding poems). I marked ten of the poems to return to some day. By the way, I have used as the title for my review the last line of my favorite poem in the book, "First Sight". For me, that line comes close to summing up the collection.
Thetath
Merwin reminds me of America's greatest poet, Walt Whitman, in this sense: His words don't sound like they're coming from a man, but from the heart of the cosmos itself. There's something timeless, primordial about his work. Merwin is one of the most consistently excellent of our great poets. This book is breathtaking.
AfinaS
This is one of the greatest books of modern poetry. It is a book for a quiet Sunday afternoon, sitting alone, let the words flow and guide one to the pervading essence. I can't begin to write as wonderful a review as Mr. Pipper wrote. I second everything he said and feel that as impossible as it may seem this poem makes one feel that you the reader are special for the reading of it and one wonders if there is another alien in the universe who can think or feel these words. The pupil is the poet, his childhood musings, not literal but as points of departure to create (what was that wonderful word Pipper used -- "capaciousness") -- yes that's it, a three dimensional experience of time and space. The entire book should really be read from cover to cover as the effect is transforming and accumulative.
Now if you think I said anything, you're as crazy as i am but to experience this poem is to make friends with yourself all over again.
Awene
W S Merwin is a great poetic genius, & this book is my favorite of what I've read by him. He writes with uncompromising exactness & economy...& I don't think there's any punctuation in the whole book. The flaring experience of the first poems becomes a kind of alembic or magnifying glass focusing of the physical world into frictionless thinking in the journey to the last few blank pages. Poems such as the waltzingly elliptical "To the Spiders of this Room" & exponentially metaphorical "Flight of Language"...& all the rest...exhibit his lexical mastery; opening lines such as "Mist iridescent over the rice fields", the brilliant imagination. As a sidenote...is the poem "The Marfa Lights" in this book a hark back to James Tate's poem "Marfa"...?