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Free eBook The Ghost at the Table download

by Suzanne Berne

Free eBook The Ghost at the Table download ISBN: 0141031131
Author: Suzanne Berne
Publisher: Penguin Books Ltd; Open market e. edition (June 28, 2007)
Language: English
Category: Imaginative Literature
Size MP3: 1230 mb
Size FLAC: 1454 mb
Rating: 4.1
Format: doc docx lrf lit


Suzanne Berne is the author of three novels, the first of which, A Crime in the Neighborhood, won great Britain’s Orange Prize. Her most recent novel is The Ghost at the Table. She lives with her family near Boston and teaches at Boston College. Библиографические данные.

Suzanne Berne is the author of three novels, the first of which, A Crime in the Neighborhood, won great Britain’s Orange Prize. The Ghost at the Table: A Novel.

Mark Twain is the literary ghost haunting Suzanne Berne's third novel, which opens . Berne eerily conjures the almost totemic power of the childhood home to reawaken sleeping selves and the ghosts gathered at the table are these discontented children.

Mark Twain is the literary ghost haunting Suzanne Berne's third novel, which opens with his epigraph that a person's memory has 'no appreciation whatever of values and proportions'. We watch in awe as Cynthia becomes once more a frightened, furious teenager.

Carrie O'Grady enjoys Suzanne Berne's tangled tale of familial hostilities at Thanksgiving, The Ghost at the Table. The two adult sisters at the heart of Suzanne Berne's new novel represent opposite attitudes to Thanksgiving

Carrie O'Grady enjoys Suzanne Berne's tangled tale of familial hostilities at Thanksgiving, The Ghost at the Table. The two adult sisters at the heart of Suzanne Berne's new novel represent opposite attitudes to Thanksgiving. Frances, the elder, is desperate for everything to be perfect as she takes one more shot at gluing together the broken shards of the Fiske clan. Cynthia, the younger, arrives sullen, already missing her solitary San Francisco flat and dreading the exhumation of the past.

When our book club chose The Ghost at the Table for its next selection, I groaned inwardly. Oh no, here we go again, another earnest, dreary slog through a dysfunctional family’s dirty laundry. But I was in for a pleasant surprise: Suzanne Berne’s lively writing, laced with irony and humor, and her skill at creating believable, three-dimensional characters won me over early on. There is tension and conflict aplenty in the Fiske family, largely brought about by the unacknowledged envy and resentment felt by the narrator, Cynthia, toward her older sister Frances.

A Shannon Ravenel Book. Algonquin books of chapel hill. For my darling daughters, Avery and Louisa. The truth is, a person’s memory has no more sense than his conscience and no appreciation whatever of values and proportions. MARK TWAIN, The Autobiography of Mark Twain.

Like me, she probably believed she intended to drive straight back to Concord after lunch, to be home before dark. Even Frances had her limits when it came to revisiting the past. shing our sandwiches at a Subway shop on Farmington Avenue, Frances said that she wanted to see if the old neighborhood looked the same. Maybe some other time. I got up to throw away our napkins and paper plates and put our soda cans into a green plastic recycling bin. There probably won’t be another time. Frances gazed up at me. Come on, we’re all the way here.

In the first ten pages, this book becomes "Everything Suzanne Berne Knows About Mark Twain. I, like Cynnie, the narrator of The Ghost at the Table, am one of three sisters

In the first ten pages, this book becomes "Everything Suzanne Berne Knows About Mark Twain. As it turns out, Suzanne Berne knows a lot about Mark Twain. He had three daughters and each had a different perspective of their father, in many of the same ways as Cynthia and Frances. I, like Cynnie, the narrator of The Ghost at the Table, am one of three sisters. And reading this novel has prompted me to recall the time one of my sisters announced to me and our other sis - we were probably all in our 30s at the time - that she did not have a happy childhood. She expected the news would come as a surprise to us - and she was right.

carousel previous carousel next. A Crime in the Neighborhood. Missing Lucile: Memories of the Grandmother I Never Knew. A Perfect Arrangement. I had forgotten that airline passengers could no longer be met at the gate, so I was briefly disheartened when I looked for Frances as I got off the plane at Logan and didn’t see her. But riding the escalator down to baggage claim, I spotted Walter’s thick gray hair and big, important-looking head near the luggage carousels. He was wearing a pair of rectangular, dark-framed glasses, a much trendier style than I’d have expected on him.

Suzanne Berne won the Orange Prize in 1999 for her debut novel, A Crime in the Neighbourhood. It was a prophetic title, capturing in five words the themes she loves; dark secrets uncoiling in small-town America. The Ghost at the Table is her third novel and it continues the trend. Cynthia earns a living writing inspirational history books for girls.

Suzanne Berne's novel, "The Ghost at the Table" is a sensitive and honest portrayal of family. She writes with humor sharp edged observation. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 12 years ago. The Ghost at the Table skillfully examines the way two sisters interpret their experiences growing up in their troubled family. Each sister has such a different view of childhood events that they are almost unrecognisable in the other's eyes.

User reviews
Hrguig
In my opinion this family is not all that dysfunctional. I saw elements of the characters in my own family and my in-laws. When families get together at the holidays there can be tension, closeness, humor, flashes of insight, arguments, resentment. Maybe some individuals will long for their home where all is quiet and familiar. A lot of families have aging parents whose needs must be met. Often parents don't have the best marriage - fathers may be distant or autocratic, moms may be sick a lot, and as they age they kind of fade away. Some family members may want to reach out to others who might otherwise spend the holiday alone - others might bring a guest just to rile things up. There may be a quiet, tortured teenager in the mix. Sisters may fight about what really happened in the past and struggle to control the situation around them. Granted, family heirlooms do not often go up in flames, but with the combination of candles and alcoholic beverages on holidays, it's always a possibility.

I liked this book a lot. I did not feel there was missing information. Yes, there were unanswered questions, just as there are in real life. I think the author's point was that we each have our own version of our history, and we view History with a capital H based on our own frame of reference. I loved the detail about Mark Twain's family life. I don't know whether it was true. There's probably no way to prove it. I'm OK with that. As the author wrote in her note at the end of the book, it all started with her own childhood visit to Twain's homestead, her fantasies about his family life, and a story involving a fictional family that evolved from that experience.

Personally, I found the story riveting. The writing was clean and excellent. The characters were totally realistic. I am going to be thinking about this book for a long time.
Valawye
This was a very readable book with above average characterizations. However, I felt much like another reviewer who stated, "What did I miss?" In my opinion, this is not so much a book on dysfunctional families as it is a book on PERCEPTIONS. Cynnie's life seems clouded by what she BELIEVED to have happened. It is, somewhat, frightening to think that one's life is so clouded by events that may OR MAY NOT have occurred. If someone is interested in reading about dysfuctional families, I urge them to read Pat Conroy, Nuala O'Failon, Sarah Willis, Richard Russo, etal. I would recommended this with reservations.
Opilar
I liked the idea of setting the story in my old haunts. Massachussets, especially the Cape, and West Hartford were well related in text. I especially liked the insights into Mark Twain and his family's secrets. BUT, the parallels with the family in the novel hit you over the head. No subtle references there!However, I expected to have some sort of resolution to who really killed momma. The housekeeper? The dad thought the middle daughter did it. The middle daughter thought the youngest sister did it. The daughter thought the dad did it. I really wanted to like this book.But, it fell short.Depressing as anything.
Dakora
I heard a panel discussion review this book on the NPR show, The Diane Rehm Show: Monthly Reader's Review. They reviewed it in November 2009, in time for Thanksgiving. I enjoyed the scholars' discussion of the book so much, that I bought it in order to read it myself.

The nuanced description of the sisters' relationships, the reconstruction of childhood memories and the fantasy of a family holiday that is never quite as fun as we wish it would be make the book painfully realistic.
Froststalker
I thought the boo sounded good and it was. It kept my interest all the way and I felt good at the end. Good author, will read her things again
BlackBerry
I really enjoyed this novel, which captures the reader in a multifaceted tale of differing childhood recollections between siblings and other family members. Once I started it, I could barely put it down
Voodoolkree
I couldn't put this book down. I really enjoyed it. Excellent author
By the time I got done reading this book which was exhausting and tiring and that's what the book was to me tiring, after awhile I didn't really care about the ghost at the table or who the ghost was supposed to be , etc., etc. not the best read to me unless you're bored out of your mind.