Free eBook Captive Queen download

by Alison Weir

Free eBook Captive Queen download ISBN: 0385667086
Author: Alison Weir
Publisher: Doubleday Canada (July 13, 2010)
Language: English
Pages: 496
Category: Imaginative Literature
Size MP3: 1363 mb
Size FLAC: 1540 mb
Rating: 4.8
Format: lrf lit txt mobi


Home Alison Weir Captive Queen. The Lady in the Tower: The Fall of Anne Boleyn.

Home Alison Weir Captive Queen. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54. Also by alison weir.

The official site of author and historian Alison Weir, featuring news of upcoming events and book releases along with exclusive content . UK. L-R: HB Hutchinson 2010; LP Windsor Paragon 2020; PB Arrow 2011

The official site of author and historian Alison Weir, featuring news of upcoming events and book releases along with exclusive content from Alison herself. L-R: HB Hutchinson 2010; LP Windsor Paragon 2020; PB Arrow 2011. USA. L-R: HB Balantine 2010; LP Thorndike Press 2010; PB Ballantine 2011.

Читать онлайн Captive Queen. Thus ran the Queen’s tumultuous thoughts as she sat with the King on their high thrones, waiting for Geoffrey and his son Henry to arrive, so that Louis could exchange with them the kiss of peace and receive Henry’s formal homage. A Novel of Eleanor of Aquitaine. A novel by Alison Weir. For seven special little people born in 2009: Henry George Marston. Charlie Andrew Preston. Maisie Isobel Flora Weir. The war was thus to be neatly concluded-except there could be no neat conclusion to Eleanor’s inner turmoil.

Alison Weir is a British writer of history books, and latterly historical novels, mostly in the form of biographies about British royalty. Her first published work, 1989's Britain's Royal Families, was a genealogical overview of the British royal family. She subsequently wrote biographies of Eleanor of Aquitaine, Isabella of France, Katherine Swynford, Elizabeth of York, and the Princes in the Tower.

Ultimately, Captive Queen is a searing psychological odyssey, an intense exploration of the character and motives of. .I absolutely loved Alison Weir's two previous novels, Innocent Traitor and The Lady Elizabeth, so I was really looking forward to Captive Queen, but I was disappointed.

Ultimately, Captive Queen is a searing psychological odyssey, an intense exploration of the character and motives of an extraordinary woman. I read historical novels because they bring history to life for me and help me to remember more of it as well. This book didn't do that for me; it seemed more like a hot romance than historical fiction.

The pain was unendurable, and the need to scream overpowering, but even in extremis she remembered that she was Queen of England and Duchess of Normandy and Aquitaine, and must behave as her dignity. Nearly there, Lady, the midwife said. Eleanor somehow found the strength to make a final effort. This was her ninth confinement, and she had never suffered such a difficult travail; all her previous babes had slipped out easily into the world with the minimum of trouble and fuss

Alison Weir is one of Britain’s top-selling historians. She is the author of numerous works of history and historical fiction, specialising in the medieval and Tudor periods.

Alison Weir is one of Britain’s top-selling historians. Her bestselling history books include The Six Wives of Henry VIII, Eleanor of Aquitaine, Elizabeth of York and, most recently, The Lost Tudor Princess. Her novels include Innocent Traitor, Katherine of Aragon: The True Queen and Anne Boleyn: A King's Obsession. She is an Honorary Life Patron of Historic Royal Palaces. She is married with two adult children and lives and works in Surrey.

Alison Weir is the New York Times bestselling author of the novels Innocent Traitor and The Lady Elizabeth and several historical biographies, including Mistress of the Monarchy, Queen Isabella, Henry VIII, Eleanor of Aquitaine, The Life of Elizabeth I, and The Six Wives of Henry VIII. She lives in Surrey, England with her husband and two children.

For historical fiction readers, a tantalizing new novel from New York Times bestselling author Alison Weir about the passionate and notorious French queen, Eleanor of Aquitaine.Renowned for her highly acclaimed and bestselling British histories, Alison Weir has in recent years made a major impact on the fiction scene with her novels about Queen Elizabeth and Lady Jane Grey. In this latest offering, she imagines the world of Eleanor of Aquitaine, the beautiful twelfth-century woman who was Queen of France until she abandoned her royal husband for the younger man who would become King of England. In a relationship based on lust and a mutual desire for great power, Henry II and Eleanor took over the English throne in 1154, thus beginning one of the most influential reigns and tumultuous royal marriages in all of history. In this novel, Weir uses her extensive knowledge to paint a most vivid portrait of this fascinating woman.
User reviews
Onaxan
I have enjoyed Allison Wiers novels for many years now so I was excited to see that I had missed reading one, The Captive Queen. I eagerly started it but was disappointed very early on to realize that the first half of it read like a trashy romance novel. I feel horrible even saying that since I have so much respect for her as a writer, but this book just started off so differently then many of her others. It did redeem itself more towards the end, when it was relying less on Eleanor and Henry's sexual escapades, but by then I was almost just trying to finish it up to move on. I have no issue with sex in a book, it's a part of life, I just don't think the plot of the story should rely solely on that like so much of this did early on. There is more to this woman than that! I gave it three stars because the second half was written much better and more interestingly but if I was reviewing just the first half I honestly probably would've given it only one star. So sorry Ms. Weir, I loved your other novels! I find Eleanor of Aquitaine to be very interesting and I absolutely loved the two novels by Christie English about her. I would recommend those to anyone looking for a well written historical Eleanor novel.
Xanzay
I bought this book because I like history, and knew only a little about Eleanor of Aquitaine. The focus is on her marriage to Henry, the English king, covering her annulment from her marriage to the French king--despite two daughters of that marriage--degrees of blood relationship or even having slept with a relative of the husband or wife could be grounds. Eleven years older than the eighteen-year-old Henry when they met, here they immediately go to bed, and agree to get the annulment and marry. They have many children, and passion at first, until he turns from her to Rosamund, a fourteen-year-old girl when they meet. Thomas Becket, who became Archbishop of Canterbury, is portrayed much less sympathetically here than usual, instead of suddenly holy, he just seems bullheaded and determined to defy his king. The conflict between Eleanor and Henry is over her wish to rule Aquitaine herself as its Duchess, and when their sons are teenagers, their wish to rule their portions of his empire he had granted them. Henry is too jealous of his power as king to allow it, and though it seems laughable today that sons barely teenagers could have the sense or maturity to rule what amounted to a small country, they war with Henry to do it, with Eleanor on their side. The bulk of the book revolves around their frequent resort to arms against their father, Eleanor's long imprisonment for supporting them, and the thirst for power on the part of every character in the drama. Eleanor's beauty was famed, and she lived to old age, though Henry died at fifty-seven, broken at last by the two sons who outlived him.
Still In Mind
Having read Weir's non-fiction, I am a huge fan of her ability to bring history to life. This is the first time I have read her fiction, and her uncertainty in the genre is evident. She seems to want to write a romance novel, since all Eleanor can think about is sex for the first few chapters. There is very little sense of what her life was like as the young wife of the King of France--other than he's pretty boring in bed, and she has had more than one affair (pretty reckless behavior for any queen!). There is not enough background about her childhood, so we don't get a sense of who she is and what she thinks, other than her random, overwhelming sexual desires. Very little is noted about her parents. I didn't really like Eleanor very much, and thought she resembled Catherine Howard.

It does get better. Once she marries Henry and their battles begin, it gets more interesting. Eleanor is pretty naive, regarding her sovereignty over Aquitaine and other regions. Although she was a queen in her own right, and the wealthiest woman in Europe because of her land holdings, she seems unaware of the feudal laws regarding her husband's power over her property. She also seems pretty stupid sometimes-- for example, after being imprisoned for many months, she is visited by Henry, and she starts taunting Henry with remarks about her non-existent affair with a court musician. This just earns her more imprisonment, and this SURPRISES her.

The chapters about her jealousy of Thomas Beckett, and how events surrounding him unravel, is the best part of the book, by far. Whenever Weir slips out of her fiction mode, and into a more factual historic point of view, the book improves dramatically. Weir is able to find Eleanor's voice by the end of the book, and it is overall a decent read.

I'm willing to bet that Weir's next work of fiction will be much better than this one, and I will definitely read whatever it turns out to be. Reviews here for her other fictional work are encouraging, but this book fell flat.
Arryar
Great book, yes some of it was a bit overboard but for a subject who is a woman ( not much written about her) and is around 900 years ago, Ms. Weir did quite well. I wanted to know more about a Great-Grandmother of mine, and I feel that I did.
Tinavio
It read as a bodice romance. Very little histpry
Lahorns Gods
I absolutely loved Alison Weir's two previous novels, Innocent Traitor and The Lady Elizabeth, so I was really looking forward to Captive Queen, but I was disappointed.

I read historical novels because they bring history to life for me and help me to remember more of it as well. This book didn't do that for me; it seemed more like a hot romance than historical fiction. I found myself wondering how much of what I was reading was totally made up. Plus this book had WAY too much sex.

I hope Alison Weir goes back to writing more like her first two novels because I find her style of writing and historical expertise quite enjoyable.