Free eBook Bedrock download

by Lisa Alther

Free eBook Bedrock download ISBN: 0804107815
Author: Lisa Alther
Publisher: Ivy Books; 1st US Ballantine edition (August 31, 1991)
Language: English
Category: Imaginative Literature
Size MP3: 1499 mb
Size FLAC: 1575 mb
Rating: 4.4
Format: azw txt mobi rtf


FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Clea Shawn has enjoyed marriage, motherhood, love affairs with both sexes; and she's traveled the world

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Clea Shawn has enjoyed marriage, motherhood, love affairs with both sexes; and she's traveled the world. Now she has come to the seemingly idyllic New England town of Roches Ridge.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers.

As Marilyn French puts it, " "Bedrock" is a hoot to read, but humor is only one of its graces. Lisa Alther writes with a profound acceptance of human variety and vagary that is rare in this mean age and that lifts the spirits.

Read Bedrock, by Lisa Alther online on Bookmate – A humorous journey from ’80s Manhattan to the wild side of small-town living, from bestselling author Lisa Alther Clea Shawn is exhausted by her lif.

Read Bedrock, by Lisa Alther online on Bookmate – A humorous journey from ’80s Manhattan to the wild side of small-town living, from bestselling author Lisa Alther Clea Shawn is exhausted by her li. A humorous journey from ’80s Manhattan to the wild side of small-town living, from bestselling author Lisa Alther Clea Shawn is exhausted by her life: her globe-trotting career as a travel photographer, her successful husband’s numerous liaisons, and the unrequited love she feels for her best friend, Elke.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Bedrock - Lisa Alther. An ivory BMW with two pairs of skis on the roof descended a long hill, granite cliffs spiked with fir trees rising up on either side of the road. The driver, Turner Shawn, had a pleasant, ruddy face and a sparse crop of graying blond hair.

By (author) Lisa Alther. Close X. Learn about new offers and get more deals by joining our newsletter.

Immediately download the Bedrock summary, chapter-by-chapter analysis, book notes, essays, quotes, character descriptions, lesson plans, and more . Everything you need to understand or teach Bedrock by Lisa Alther. Download the Study Guide. Bedrock Summary & Study Guide.

Immediately download the Bedrock summary, chapter-by-chapter analysis, book notes, essays, quotes, character descriptions, lesson plans, and more - everything you need for studying or teaching Bedrock. Known as a comic writer whose satirical portraits of regions and decades, especially the 1970s, Alther explores manners and mores both in high culture and rural life.

She is the author of six novels: Kinflicks, Original Sins, Other Women, Bedrock, Five Minutes in Heaven, and W. isa Alther. Lisa will read from and sign her new book ABOUT WOMEN tomorrow, Thursday, April 7th at Artiques in downtown Kingsport (338 Commerce S.

What she learns makes for Lisa Alther's most sinfully irreverent, deliciously comic, and richly revelatory novel - an unforgettable tale of the intellectual graspings, emotional flip-flops, and erotic acrobatics of a woman who is not quite sure what she wants, but who wants it in the very worst.

What she learns makes for Lisa Alther's most sinfully irreverent, deliciously comic, and richly revelatory novel - an unforgettable tale of the intellectual graspings, emotional flip-flops, and erotic acrobatics of a woman who is not quite sure what she wants, but who wants it in the very worst way, and wants it now. Genre: Literary Fiction. Used availability for Lisa Alther's Bedrock.

User reviews
Jothris
This only minimally satisfying novel revolves around Clea Shawn, an attractive New Yorker and accomplished photographer and author of travelogue books, and her search for a boost to her life in the rural Vermont town of Roches Ridge. Clea, a mother of two college students and married to a successful executive, has lived around the world, enjoying the customs if not the local men. But on a skiing trip with her husband, Clea falls in love with the idyllic, snow-covered town of Roches Ridge. Within days, acting alone, she finds herself to be the owner of an older, mini-mansion with unsuspected pervasive decay and huge amounts of trash in the yards covered by winter snow.

Of course, in actuality, the entire town is hardly as charming as first thought. Though the author maintains an amused and tolerant stance as Clea has various dealings with the townspeople, the reality is that it is hard to imagine a more sloven, deformed, and disgusting collection of people. A second thread is Clea's estrangement from her very close artistic friend in NYC, not to mention from her family.

This story of a woman in some sort of personal crisis is mildly interesting, although it is difficult to sympathize with Clea, a woman with a good life who is vaguely dissatisfied. The strange doings of the town's characters threaten to obscure any extensive examination of her difficulties. The book lacks focus.
Samutilar
Ms. Alther's humor has always delighted me, and this book is another worthy achievement of hers. Woman of the world Clea Shawn decides to give up her lovers and travels, and seeks peace in a small town in New Hampshire. She surprisingly does adapt to little Roches Ridge although she is now physically separated from her husband, teenage children, and her female best friend.
While I enjoyed the book I did find the whole thing a bit unsettling. The two plot lines of the novel clashed a bit. The part of the story dealing with the outlandish citizens of Roches Ridge -and believe me there is not a normal person in the whole town- is quite hilarious. The other theme, Clea's relations with her family, and, most importantly, with her best friend Elke provide us with a more serious story. Either plot would have made a decent novel in itself.
It's good Alther, though. Highly recommended.
Kahavor
A rather boring tale of a spoiled yuppie woman trying to fit into a small town which has an unimaginable population of weird characters.
Coiriel
An earlier Lisa Alther character, Ginny Babcock in "Kinflicks", once described herself as "The Emma Bovary of Stark's Bog", and Clea Shawn, the central figure of "Bedrock", also has much in common with Flaubert's heroine. Indeed, she can be diagnosed as a sufferer from what in French would be called "le Bovarysme"- a state of restless discontent coupled with a firm belief that the next major development in one's life, whatever it may be, will bring lasting happiness and cure one's discontent for ever.
Clea is a successful, middle-aged art-photographer, married to a wealthy New York business executive and the mother of two children, both students at university. She and her husband Turner have an "open marriage" which allows them to conduct affairs with other parties, and Clea has thrown herself passionately into a number of such relationships in a vain attempt to find a greater intimacy than she enjoys with her husband. Neither wealth, success in her career nor her other lovers, however, have brought Clea much happiness, and she is continually in search of something that will bring her the satisfaction she craves.
At the start of the book Clea has just fallen in love again. Not, this time, with a person but with a place- Roches Ridge, the small town in Vermont where she has (against her husband's wishes) bought a house as her rural retreat. Clea has an idealised view of small-town life as a peaceful retreat from a bustling, crime-ridden city like New York. It is, however, a standard literary cliché that the more idyllic and tranquil a small town appears on the surface, the more likely it is to prove to be a place of rampant corruption, raging hatreds and illicit sexual passions, and Roche's Ridge proves to be no exception.
There are two distinct threads running through the book, one basically serious, the other basically comic. The serious thread concerns Clea herself, her attempts to find happiness and her relationships with those around her. The most important figure in her life is neither her husband (a remote figure who spends most of his time away from her on business trips abroad) nor any of the other men she takes as lovers but her closest female friend, Elke, a German-born sculptress. Clea and Elke are contrasting characters. Both are discontented, but only Clea looks for a cure for discontent. Whereas Clea is an eternal optimist, persuaded that every change in her life, be it a new love affair or the purchase of a rural property, will bring her the contentment that has hitherto eluded her, Elke is a pessimist, convinced that life is both cruel and meaningless and that happiness will forever elude her and the rest of humanity. Both see themselves as creative artists, but their attitude to art is as different as their attitude to life. Clea's photographs are deliberately composed to be aesthetically appealing, with anything sordid excluded, whereas Elke's sculptures focus on cruelty and suffering.
The more serious scenes in the book generally take place in New York. The comic thread concerns the people of Roche's Ridge. The portrait that Ms Alther draws of the small community is a broad and satirical one. Just about every inhabitant is either mad, or bad, or both. The town is home to two groups of outsiders, one an apocalyptic religious cult, the other a lesbian-feminist commune, both led by sinister guru-figures. The natives of the town itself, however, are scarcely less eccentric; each seems to be prey to his or her own private obsession, such as Calvin Roche, who longs to escape to Texas to live the life of a cowboy, the bodybuilding hairdresser Jared McQueen who tries to persuade all the town's women to adopt punk hairstyles and Dack Marsh (real name Dacron), an artist who specialises in making arrangements of animal bones. (The scene where the simpleton Dack is taken up by New York sophisticates as a "primitive" artist allows Ms Alther to aim some sharp satirical barbs at the modern art scene). Underlying the placid surface of Roche's Ridge is an undercurrent of sexual perversity and lawlessness; one of the book's key moments comes when Clea makes an unwelcome discovery about the nasty goings-on in the shed owned by her neighbours, the disreputable Marsh family.
The book's main weakness is perhaps that its serious and satirical threads are not wholly integrated. At times I felt that I was actually reading two novels at once, switching from one to the other at the end of each chapter. There is an attempt to bring together all the book's themes at the end, but I did not find this wholly successful. I felt that Ms Alther achieved a more satisfying blend of the serious and the satirical in her two earlier novels "Kinflicks" and "Original Sins", possibly because in those books the satire had some serious points to make. In "Bedrock" it seems more like satire for satire's sake. I also found myself growing bored with the depressing figure of Elke, with her tendency to wallow in her own misery and in the misery of others.
Nevertheless, I have still given this book four stars because of the wit and style of Ms Alther's writing, particularly when she is in her comic mode. Although her satire has less political edge than it did in her earlier works, I still found myself laughing at the eccentric townsfolk of Roche's Ridge. Clea, for all her idiosyncrasies, is a likeable heroine, an older (but not necessarily wiser) version of Ginny Babcock. At least things finish more happily for her than they did for Emma Bovary.