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Free eBook Eskimo Folklore: Myths and Traditions from Northern Alaska, the McKenzie Delta and Coronation Gulf download

by Diamond Jenness

Free eBook Eskimo Folklore: Myths and Traditions from Northern Alaska, the McKenzie Delta and Coronation Gulf download ISBN: 0898759633
Author: Diamond Jenness
Publisher: Univ Pr of the Pacific (June 1, 2002)
Language: English
Pages: 108
Category: Imaginative Literature
Subcategory: Mythology and Folk Tales
Size MP3: 1192 mb
Size FLAC: 1967 mb
Rating: 4.1
Format: rtf lrf mobi lrf


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by Diamond Jenness (Author). Unknown Binding, 1924. Special offers and product promotions.

Published 1924 by . Eskimo texts": p. 3-31. Bibliography": p. 90. Series.

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Myths and traditions from northern Alaska, the Mackenzie delta and Cor.

The second part consists of English versions of eighty-one Inuit myths and folktales. By line: Author's name as appearing in the actual publication by Diamond Jenness. HRAF Publication Information: New Haven, Conn. Human Relations Area Files, 1996. Culture: Culture name from the Outline of World Cultures (OWC) with the alphanumberic OWC identifier in parenthesis. Subjects: Document-level OCM identifiers given by the anthropology subject indexers at HRAF Literary texts (539); Mythology (773)

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In 1926 Diamond Jenness began the first systematic archaeological work in Alaska at Cape Prince of Wales and Little Diomede Island on Bering Strait

In 1926 Diamond Jenness began the first systematic archaeological work in Alaska at Cape Prince of Wales and Little Diomede Island on Bering Strait. This resulted in the first identification of Old Bering Sea culture and determined the stratigraphic position of Thule culture in Alaska, laying the groundwork for later investigations by Collins, Giddings and others.

Iesb jenness, diamond. Myths and traditions from Northern Alaska, the Mackenzie Delta, and Coronation Gulf. The life of the Copper Eskimos. West Greenland before 1950," in Hand- book of North American Indians, vol. 5, Arctic. Smithsonian Insti- tution.

Traditions From Northern Alaska, the Mackenzie Delta and Coronation Gulfby Diamond JennessVol. Myths and Folk-Lore of the Timiskaming Algonquin and Timagami Ojibwaby F. G. Speck. Tales of the Tepeeby Edward Everett Dale. Jicarilla Apache Textsby Pliny Earle Goddard.

13. FolkloreWhat Is It and What Is the Good of It?by Edwin Sidney Hartland.

These myths and traditions were collected along the Arctic coast between December, 1913, and June, 1916. They are divided into two parts: the first comprises the Alaskan stories, with which are included one story from the Siberian coast and four others from the Mackenzie river delta; the second comprises the tales collected among the Copper Eskimos, from the regions of Dolphin and Union strait and Coronation gulf. Even a surface examination will show that there is a great difference in the tales from the two regions. The Alaskan stories are more sophisticated, as a rule; they are longer and more detailed, and have a definite beginning and ending. The various incidents, too, are placed in their proper setting with just the descriptive touches required to give them an air of reality.

The Copper Eskimo tales, on the other hand, have the appearance of disjointed fragments without any setting, and lacking both beginning and ending. They were never told straightforwardly, as in Alaska, but had to be drawn out of the natives piecemeal, word by word and sentence by sentence, with many repetitions and digressions by way of explanation. The English translations tend to gloss over their crude and disjointed character, which is far more noticeable in the original Eskimo.