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Free eBook The Last Song of Dusk: A Novel download

by Siddharth Dhanvant Shanghvi

Free eBook The Last Song of Dusk: A Novel download ISBN: 1611452600
Author: Siddharth Dhanvant Shanghvi
Publisher: Arcade Publishing (April 18, 2011)
Language: English
Pages: 304
Category: Imaginative Literature
Subcategory: Literary
Size MP3: 1359 mb
Size FLAC: 1720 mb
Rating: 4.5
Format: lit rtf lrf docx


Siddharth Dhanvant Shanghvi (born 1977) is an Indian author.

Siddharth Dhanvant Shanghvi (born 1977) is an Indian author. His debut novel The Last Song of Dusk (2004) won the Betty Trask Award (UK), one of UK's most prestigious prizes for debut novels, the Premio Grinzane Cavour (Italy) for the Best Debut novel, and was nominated for the IMPAC Literary Prize (Ireland).

Last Song of Dusk: Sidharth Dhanvant Sanghvi. I just finished this essentially wonderful piece of literary art work

Last Song of Dusk: Sidharth Dhanvant Sanghvi. I just finished this essentially wonderful piece of literary art work. The author has the profound ability to express his thoughts, in a beautiful concoction of words. Last Song of Dusk has beautifully captured the essence of sorrow and longing in Anuradha, a tempest fire in Nandini, who faces the world like a wall, but is fallible to her innate problem and Vardhaman, who leads a life filled with a guilt, he is never able to overcome. Other than that, the various insinuations to the not so normal sexual exploits of various characters in the story, expose the reader to a window, where not many have would have set sight before.

The author, Siddharth Dhanvant Shanghvi, has a true talent for description, but sometimes he loses control of himself and .

The author, Siddharth Dhanvant Shanghvi, has a true talent for description, but sometimes he loses control of himself and indulges in prose that becomes positively violet (especially in the sex scenes with all the phallic This book is odd to me, because it's lushly written- I can smell the frangipani that Anuradha braids into her hair, hear the peacocks screeching . As a first novel, The Last Song of Dusk is excellent, achieving a dreamlike surreality that other, more experienced writers strive (and fail) to accomplish, but in comparison to other authors (masters) of this genre (Isabel Allende, Arundhati Roy) it's clear where he's being imitative, rather than intuitive.

Its a really a great masterpiece of Siddharth Dhanvant Shanghvi. I really enjoyed this book till the last page I turned. This book is having all the iridescent color of life the grief, happiness, love. aksanil, March 11, 2010.

Shanghvi’s lyrical first novel, The Last Song of Dusk, is a major achievement: It’s impishly funny and stunningly wise. Like the arranged marriage at its heart, this steamy fairy tale blossoms into a mind-expanding treasure map for finding redemption in loss, peace despite life’s contradictions, and the courage to love and live big. —

Siddharth Dhanvant Shanghvi’s debut novel tells the story of Anuradha, who moves to 1920s Bombay from Udaipur to marry Vardhmaan. The novel follows their blossoming marriage through its highs and lows with powerful, addictive prose.

Siddharth Dhanvant Shanghvi’s debut novel tells the story of Anuradha, who moves to 1920s Bombay from Udaipur to marry Vardhmaan. The Last Song of Dusk’ by Siddharth Dhanvant Shanghvi Courtesy of Penguin.

Siddharth Dhanvant Shanghvi. Download PDF book format. Choose file format of this book to download

Siddharth Dhanvant Shanghvi. Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. Download this format book. The last song of dusk Siddharth Dhanvant Shanghvi. Book's title: The last song of dusk Siddharth Dhanvant Shanghvi. Library of Congress Control Number: 2004009481. International Standard Book Number (ISBN)

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A brilliant new voice tells an exuberant and tender story of love and loss, sex, karma, and colonialism set in 1920s India.

User reviews
Arakus
I think I should first note that the biggest, most fundamental problem with this book is the plot sucks and Shanghvi relies on shocking content/declarations and magical realism to distract from this. It does not really make sense, it is incredibly forced. The characters do not make rational decisions. It does not make any sense why the book ended up like it did.

I like the idea of this book, but if fails completely at its goal. There is nothing about love in this book. This book is about pain. The central premise is really not about love and finding love and the effects of love. The central premise is about how crappy things happen to people and that justifies them for doing crappy things to other people. There is no fate in this book at all. Everything that happens, the characters choose to let happen. The only thing that can be said to be fate are Mohan's death and the character's back stories. Everything that occurs in the novel did not have to happen, the characters just chose to let it happen. There are books that express fate well, this book does not.

The back text says that after the death of their son "the couple attempts to mend their marriage." Yeah, they don't do that. Unless "mending" their marriage is not talking to each other and being melancholy. They loose their child, which is traumatic. They don't try to mend their marriage, they just decide that it is broken and then just get used to silence. They never discuss anything, they just feel guilty the whole time about not talking and it is supposed to be this big poetic exploration about love, because in true love apparently there is no communication?

Let me make this clear: Shanghvi knows nothing about love. Absolutely nothing. He knows a lot about lust and passion and expresses those well, but nothing at all about love.

Nandni's relationships...fate? Really Shanghvi? That was fate? When she was like, wow you make me so happy, but I have to go wreck someone else's marriage so I am "fated" to not marry you so that I can be "fated" to spend the rest of my life regretting not marrying you. Or she could have just said, wow, I love you, you make me so happy, let's have our own relationship. No, that can't happen, because this story is about "love" so Nandni rips out the guys heart and steps on it, wrecks someone else's marriage (by murdering the fiance, no less. Remember the theme of "if something bad happens to me, it justifies doing awful things to someone else?), realizes she can't marry the guy, then spends the rest of her life melancholy wondering why oh why fate took her first love from her, so cruel! No, so much bs. Like I said, this novel is about pain. Nandni had some crappy things happen to her, so that justifies her in causing pain to Sherman. Vardhmann had some awful things happen to him, which justified him in doing cruel things to Anuradha.

See, the sickest part of this novel is the central moving point, which is the love of Edward. Except Edward's "love" is essentially like the plot of the move Obsessed, for those of you who have seen it. Edward is basically one of those people who say "love me or I will kill myself." Those, mentally ill, manipulative people who try to force their own way. Edward had some crappy stuff happen to him, which justifies him in later doing awful things to Anuradha, Nandni, Vardhmann, and Shokla. Also, Edward kills a dog. Being denied your love apparently justifies torturing and killing a dog. It basically explodes. Okay? Do you understand that? Shanghvi's book about love suggests that if you don't get what you want in "love" which is still "selfless" you are perfectly justified in mutilating small animals. There is absolutely nothing wrong with a gay love story. Actually I wish this novel were about Vardhman and Arjun or something rather than Anuradha. That would have been a tragically poetic love story worth reading. Shanghvi only describes male sex organs and sexuality in detail anyways, so just make it a gay love story. Make it tragic, make it hurt. Fate would make sense there. But my take away here is that Edward is a twisted, spoiled brat who privileges his own existence and makes homosexuals look like soulless monsters. The other homosexual character, Libya Dass, who is also something of a tragic character, is much easier to sympathize with. I hated Edward and the stupid house, but Libya was wonderful.

Also, for some reason Shanghvi takes some pretty hard jabs at Virginia Woolf that completely misrepresent her. I am not exactly sure what he is trying to do with this novel ideologically, because I am pretty sure what with her women's rights stuff and her stances on sexuality and all that, Woolf would have been on board with a lot of Shanghvi's ideas. Except, you must remember that the central idea of "love" to Shanghvi is the deliciousness of revenge and pain, not any positive aspect of love. Anyhow, despite disliking it, I am glad I read this so I can use it to contextualize modern Indian literature, but if I ever was in the situation in which I was suddenly, desperately limited in my bookshelf space and had to absolutely destroy the texts that would not fit, between Woolf and Shanghvi I wouldn't have to even think about it before tossing him away.

If you really are looking for those beautiful/painful stories about love and loss, don't waste your time with any of Shanghvi's books. The Last Flamingoes of Bombay is better than The Last Song of Dusk, but don't bother. Start with Jhumpa Lahiri instead. She does everything Shanghvi is trying to do so much better. Her three books are beyond excellent.

Oh, one other problem with this book: it definitely advocates having sex with children and the sexualizing of children. Multiple people have consensual sex with Nandini starting when she is fourteen. He doesn't do it in an "oh my gosh, this is awful, why do we allow this" kind of way like Toni Morrison does so well. He does it in a wow, Nandni is sexy, now she is having sex with adults kind of way. It is not okay to portray this.
Deorro
This book goes on my favorites list. I read it years ago, and still call it one of my favorite books ever. I loved every word of it, and loved the fairy tale of it, and it was a fairy tale indeed. I giggled at the reader's reviews that found this book 'unrealistic' because it is pure fantasy, nothing realistic about it at all, but it's not supposed to be real. And after having traveled to India, I can guarantee that it truly is a fantasy. This book took me far and away and into the land of exotic make believe. You can read the other reviews posted here for details on the story, but I wanted to put my vote in. Everyone I've loaned it to loves it, and I'm here at Amazon today to send it as a gift.
santa
I didn't finish it. A friend recommended the author but I couldn't get into the book. Some may like it better than I.
Dalallador
Amazing. Amazing. Amazing.
Marr
Last Song of Dusk: Sidharth Dhanvant Sanghvi

I just finished this essentially wonderful piece of literary art work. The author has the profound ability to express his thoughts, in a beautiful concoction of words. And for sure, he stretches and expresses his imagination far away and moulds them into a dreamlike reality.
The novel, set in the pre-independence era, takes us through the life of a modern young girl, from the state of Rajasthan, married to a doctor in Mumbai.

This book vastly differs from Sanghvi's other novel, 'Lost Flamingoes of Bombay' which , set in the backdrop of the Jessica Lal murder case, failed to ignite the spark of novelty for the reader.

Last Song of Dusk has beautifully captured the essence of sorrow and longing in Anuradha, a tempest fire in Nandini, who faces the world like a wall, but is fallible to her innate problem and Vardhaman, who leads a life filled with a guilt, he is never able to overcome.

Other than that, the various insinuations to the not so normal sexual exploits of various characters in the story, expose the reader to a window, where not many have would have set sight before.

I would defintiely recommend atleast a one time read, for a unique style of writing and imaginative prowess of the author.
Beahelm
The Last Song of Dusk marks the debut of yet another imaginative Indian author who writes in hyperbole and lush, sweeping strokes. Beautiful, impish Arunradha, with a voice to which "even the moon listens" marries the handsome doctor Vardhmaan, whose stories win her heart. The two become best friends and lovers, with such intimacy that it seems as though nothing can come between them. Even Vardhmaan's evil stepmother Divi-bai cannot drive them apart. But when their beloved and charmed son Mohan is sucked from his room into a tree, then dropped, Divi-bai finds their weakness, and all changes between them. Eventually, they move to an malevolent house with Arunradha's wild teenage cousin Nandina, who sets about to make her mark on Bombay society and the world. The three struggle to find the answer to the question, "Is love enough?"

Reminiscent in parts of the work of Chitra Divakaruni, Arundhati Roy, and Isabelle Allende, The Last Song of Dusk explores the meaning of love in an occasionally magical world where houses have intentions and women mate with panthers. The novel falters when it brings in historical figures such as Gandhi since the novel's strength lies in the smaller, more believable moments. The language, although often seductive, can be overblown, but Shanghvi's passion for storytelling and his characters resonates in every sentence. Even when he fails, he picks up the narrative and continues toward the resolution with authority.

Recommended for a general readership, particularly for those who enjoyed The God of Small Things (Roy) and The House of Spirits (Allende.) While The Last Song of Dusk doesn't approach the success of either, it occupies a spot in the same literary tradition.