Free eBook Adolphe download

by Benjamin Constant

Free eBook Adolphe download ISBN: 2290314471
Author: Benjamin Constant
Publisher: J'ai lu (November 17, 2002)
Language: French
Category: Imaginative Literature
Subcategory: Literary
Size MP3: 1838 mb
Size FLAC: 1604 mb
Rating: 4.3
Format: lit rtf mobi doc


28 quotes from Benjamin Constant: 'The great question in life is the suffering we cause, and the most ingenious metaphysics do not justify the man who has broken . should be given to repentance. Benjamin Constant, Adolphe.

28 quotes from Benjamin Constant: 'The great question in life is the suffering we cause, and the most ingenious metaphysics do not justify the man who has broken the heart that loved hi., 'Every time government attempts to handle our affairs, it costs more and the results are worse than if we had handled them ourselves. and 'Art for art's sake, with no purpose, for any purpose perverts art. But art achieves a purpose which is not its own. (1804)'.

Benjamin Constant's novella Adolphe (1808) describes the experience of love as it unfolds . Benjamin Constant had come in direct contact with this lady of overwhelming virtue and indefatigable neo-classical idealizations.

Benjamin Constant's novella Adolphe (1808) describes the experience of love as it unfolds between a man of high political ambitions and a woman of intellectual radiance. The matter is given further weight considering its autobiographical resonance which it had with Constant, the liberal politician immersed in disambiguous articulations during the Reign of Terror while aspiring to the French Government, and the consummate intellectual beauty of Madame De Stael, author of Corinne and a veritable giant of European literature.

by. Benjamin Constant. Book digitized by Google from the library of Oxford University and uploaded to the Internet Archive by user tpb. Addeddate. ark:/13960/t2j67jj76.

Henri-Benjamin Constant de Rebecque (French: ; 25 October 1767 – 8 December 1830), or simply Benjamin Constant, was a Swiss-French political activist and writer on politics and religion. He was the author of a partly biographical psychological novel, Adolphe.

PDF Adolphe is a sorrowful classic novella by Benjamin Constant, first published in London and Paris in 1816. The book has captivated numerous scholars and romantic readers who are lucky to discover it.

Adolphe is a privileged and refined young man, bored by the stupidity he perceives in the world around him. After a number of meaningless conquests, he at last encounters Ellenore, a beautiful and passionate older woman. Adolphe is enraptured and gradually wears down her resistance to his declarations of love.

Books related to Adolphe by Benjamin Constant (Book Analysis). Great Philosophers Who Failed at Love. Dialogue Between A Priest And A Dying Man (Mobi Classics).

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User reviews
GYBYXOH
I haven't received or read this translation yet, but I'm really looking forward to it, because I have read two other translations of ADOLPHE (Wildman and Mauldoon), and know that Leonard Tannock was especially concerned about the quality of his translations from French.

ADOLPHE is a short novel (really a novella), the only literary production of Benjamin Constant but one of the most important novels in French history.

You could consider it Proust in miniature for its startlingly acute analysis of the psychology of love, indifference, and despair, all of which preoccupied Proust at major length. Based on Constant's real-life affairs, it has the ring of authority and grips any receptive reader from start to last.

The mystery is why Constant never wrote another novel (or novella). His political career was illustrious, but so was his literary gift. Why he squelched it is hard to fathom.
Amarin
First, I have read this book in French as it was available for free as a Kindle download and a friend suggested that its much better then the English translation. As my French is a bit rusty I decided to also read it in English. It was a mistake. The translation is a the worst I ever saw. It felt as if a 16 year old set down with a dictionary and attempted a word for word translation. It was so painful after the beautiful French version that I had to put it down 20 pages into the book, as it was unbearable. I am giving this rating for the terrible translation not to the book.
Kekinos
Benjamin Constant's novella Adolphe (1808) describes the experience of love as it unfolds between a man of high political ambitions and a woman of intellectual radiance. The matter is given further weight considering its autobiographical resonance which it had with Constant, the liberal politician immersed in disambiguous articulations during the Reign of Terror while aspiring to the French Government, and the consummate intellectual beauty of Madame De Stael, author of Corinne and a veritable giant of European literature. Madame De Stael's reputation is just a step below Rousseau and Goethe when viewed from the vantage point of the aftermath of the French Revolution and the aesthetics it forged. Benjamin Constant had come in direct contact with this lady of overwhelming virtue and indefatigable neo-classical idealizations. The hopeful parliamentarian and champion of liberalism came under her spell immediately and fought to release himself for the rest of his life.
The stark sincerity of the novel is psychological store-house of moods and conflicted sentiments as they harrow a man of action into a bonding servility of hysterics and torture. The couple was consumed by love and hatred for each other and Adolphe (Benjamin in literary disguise) seem to be incapable of living with the thought, the passion and the inexorable emotional exhaustion that resulted from it.
The first pages of the novella follow such a anguished sensibility, in all its enthusiasm and repudiation, its forthright disgust and lamentable need. Analytically Adolphe will follow the laws of reason and attempt an escape from such passions but he shall never avail himself of such logic, until ultimately the object and subject of his hysteria, Ellenore (De Stael) dies.
The plot is a ferocious introspective devolution of a conscience that conducts a travesty of his own self attempting to make sense of the self-sacrificing emotional eruption that parallels the instability and paralysis of France amidst the Reign of Terror. Love and glory are inextricably intertwined in his cynical aptitude and his inability to make ends of things demands a force he has not within himself to summon. Vanity at times becomes lucidly displayed and at others is caricatured as the recruit of a mind suffering from the buffets of a tempest that leaves him stranded and exiled from a world he cannot fathom.
Infatuating, exasperating and convulsive, this novel reads like the record a wrestling match with Eros, an epistle to Athena and a descent into the Dionysian realms of our very nature.
In all of literature the only other novels that are able to depict such a theme with the like intensity and sincerity are Mme de Krüdener's novel Valérie, Marcel Proust's The Captive, November by Flaubert, Raymond Radiguet's The Devil in the Flesh, and Marguerite Duras The Lover.
Of note the fact that the gorgeous and astounding literary feat of Mme de Krüdener, Valérie, remains untranslated in English. That is an outrage.
Vonalij
Benjamin Constant is a fascinating figure in the history of French letters. He was amongst a group of writers that were at the forefront of the Romantic Movement in France that included Jean-Jacques Rousseau and Constant's mistress, Germaine de Stael. Madame de Stael was a leading light of intellectual society during the directorate and the empire periods. Her salon in Geneva was the meeting place for many of the artists, philosophers, novelists and poets of her day. Benjamin Constant was her lover and most ardent admirer. Critics have long assumed that the core plot of Adolphe, which involves a younger male engaged in a prolonged liaison with an older mistress, must have been autobiographical. L. W. Tancock, in his introduction to the Penguin Classics edition, claims that this is only partly the case. He writes: "What are Eleanore and Adolphe? Of course the factual framework is the story of Anna Lindsay, the beautiful, ageing, foreign mistress of an aristocrat, and so is Ellanore's submissiveness and limited intelligence. On the other hand the possessiveness, the violence, the scenes, the sending out of a search party to bring back the wandering lover, all these things are from the miserable existence of Benjamin with Mme de Stael." So what we are left with basically is an amalgam of autobiography and fiction, somewhat the same formula Tolstoy used in Anna Karenina.
Whereas Tolstoy, in his depiction of a tragic love affair was wonderfully digressive, producing a novel with various sub-plots and a large, colorful canvas, Constant opts for economy and directness. This is a short novel, what by today's standard would be called a novella. It is composed of ten short chapters and is thus, ostensibly, "an easy read." It follows one plot line with one set of characters (though there is a framing narrative, it doesn't interfere with the essential linearity of the story).
The plot is rather familiar to readers of European literature. It follows the would be Cassanova, Adolphe, who, in his early twenties, decides that he must have a mistress if he is to be a man of fashion. He therefore lights upon a woman about ten years older than himself and whom he regards as a realistic target because she is already somewhat socially compromised, as she is the mistress of an older man, a certain Count P___. Elleanore is slow to succumb to Adolphe's machinations, but he is persistent and she eventually yields. The two lovers carry on a secret affair for a period and eventually Count P__ figures out what's going on under his nose and Elleanore makes the decision to leave her supporter and her children and cast her fate with Adolphe. Adolphe by this point has gotten cold feet and tries to dissuade her from leaving children and protector, but she is insanely in love and will follow Adolphe to perfidy and damnation if need be. They leave town and take their illicit love on the road. Adolphe, who has manufactured his feelings for Elleanore in the first place, becomes more and more morose as he realizes he has gotten in over his head and he now has a mistress who is completely dependent on him and who lets him know about it continually. Adolphe's father, meanwhile, who initially insinuated that Adolphe should take on a mistress, entirely disapproves of his son's choice. Finally the couple move to Poland, where Elleanore is to come into a large inheritance and Adolphe finds his existence more and more meaningless. At the urging of one of his father's aristocratic friends in Poland, Adolphe finally comes to the decision that he must break away from Elleanore, so he writes a letter to his father promising to end the affair. She intercepts the letter and falls into a swoon that eventually takes her death's door and to her final demise. Adolphe ends up as a broken man, wandering the outer byways of the continent, lamenting the errors of his ways.
Adolphe is an example of the concise, crystalline form of writing for which the French are noted. It is the form utilized and epitomized by writers such as Abbe Prevost, Rene de Chateaubriand, Alfred De Musset, etc. The novels they produced create in depth what they lack in length. That is one of the reasons we call them classics.
This review is for the Penguin Classics paperback version of Adolphe, prefaced and translated by L.W. Tancock