Free eBook Ask download

by Sam Lipsyte

Free eBook Ask download ISBN: 1906964572
Author: Sam Lipsyte
Publisher: Old Street Publishing (February 1, 2011)
Language: English
Pages: 304
Category: Imaginative Literature
Subcategory: Humor and Satire
Size MP3: 1709 mb
Size FLAC: 1814 mb
Rating: 4.8
Format: mobi doc mbr lrf


Sam Lipsyte is so freaking hilarious, too freaking hilarious, that I actually started to drown as I slogged through his super clever sentences and whack, sarcastic dialogue

Sam Lipsyte is so freaking hilarious, too freaking hilarious, that I actually started to drown as I slogged through his super clever sentences and whack, sarcastic dialogue. I couldn't follow the thin plot I was Sam Lipsyte's bitch for the first 60 pages of his novel "The As. I mean, he really had me in the zone.

The Ask" by Sam Lipsyte was named one of the New York Times 100 Notables Books of 2010

The Ask" by Sam Lipsyte was named one of the New York Times 100 Notables Books of 2010. And it is easy to understand why after reading this dark, eloquently written masterpiece that takes the reader on an adventure through the life of several what I would call sad and complicated characters. Milo is the primary character in this book.

The Ask by Sam Lipsyte-Audiobook Excerpt. Lipsyte on the Read Roll Show. is a biting, bilious and often brilliant book. It started, for me, as a comic, bad-boy outing on Mr. Toad's Wild Ride. It concludes somewhere much darker and richer than a theme park.

It goes without saying that The Ask is hysterically funny, even excluding the passages where you're too busy mentally applauding and calculating the many ways in which it's funny to laugh.

And what a ride it is. We're pinned back in our seats by the prose's headlong momentum; we're craning forward to see what's coming next. It goes without saying that The Ask is hysterically funny, even excluding the passages where you're too busy mentally applauding and calculating the many ways in which it's funny to laugh. Lipsyte (born 1968) has always been funny, but it's taken him a while to mature into something more.

The Ask is the best book yet from one of America's finest comic writers, an author who can prompt Chuck Palahniuk to write: 'I laughed out loud - and I never laugh out loud'. A critical sensation on both sides of the Atlantic, this is a ridiculously accomplished, ridiculously entertaining novel that sympathises even as it skewers. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Sam Lipsyte’s third novel, The Ask, is a dark and jaded beast - the sort of book that, if it were an animal, would be a lumbering, hairy, cryptozoological ape-man with a near-crippling case of elephantiasis. Venus Drive, story by Sam Lipsyte, Open City (magazine). Corrections", Poets & Writers, May/June 2010.

An intense, mordantly funny collection of short fiction from the author of Home Landand The As. man with an "old soul" finds himself at a Times Square peep show, looking for more than just a little action. A young man goes into some serious regression after finding his deceased mother's stash of morphine. A group of summer-camp sadists return to the scene of the crime. Sam Lipsyte's brutally funny narratives tread morally ambiguous terrain, where desperate characters stumble over hope, or sometimes merely stumble

Download books for free. Sam Lipsyte But it turns out that the ask is Milo’s sinister college classmate Purdy Stuart.

Download books for free. Milo Burke, a development officer at a third-tier university, has not been developing : after a run-in with a well-connected undergrad, he finds himself among the burgeoning class of the newly unemployed. Grasping after odd jobs to support his wife and child, Milo is offered one last chance by his former employer: he must reel in a potential donor-a major ask -who, mysteriously, has requested Milo’s involvement. But it turns out that the ask is Milo’s sinister college classmate Purdy Stuart. And the give won’t come cheap.

Sincerely, The Blue Newt Faction. Fuck, I said, a word I had made sincere efforts to purge from my repertoire of professed displeasure, at least in the presence of my son. orning and Bernie and I were alone on an Astoria side street, not far from a sandwich shop that sold a sopressatta sub called The Bypass.

A New York Times BestsellerA New York Times Book Review Editorsâ?™ ChoiceMilo Burkeâ?”husband, father, development officer at a third-tier universityâ?”has just joined the burgeoning class of the newly unemployed. Grasping after odd jobs to support his wife and child, Milo is relieved to get another chance from his former boss. All he has to do is reel in a potential donor who, mysteriously, has requested Miloâ?™s involvement. Exploring such themes as work, war, sex, class, child rearing, romantic comedies, Benjamin Franklin, cooking shows on death row, and the eroticization of chicken wire, The Ask is a hilarious tour de force from a writer who has already shown that the deepest fictions are often the funniest.

User reviews
Bukus
Readers who have problems with this book seem to want it to be a sort of book it sets out to undermine (eviscerate?) and side-step. It's a Bartleby-like book that prefers not to take novelistic conventions seriously because it perceives them as complicit in a rigged game. It sees our narrative tropes generally as advertisements for a striver culture implanted in a system of social stasis, society's humanistic romance tarting up an inhumane struggle to feel good about the collateral damage of empire. Yes, it's funny. Yes, it's satirical. Yes, it's characters are jokes. The whole book is an elaborate and revelatory joke. It isn't supposed to "hook you" into its contrived plot or help you transcend the darker feelings about America's simultaneous victory and decline. It's a toboggan ride of hilarious rage along a slippery slope of brilliant language, destined to slide to a stop just past one's awareness that rage isn't meaningful. It's Candide for hipsters. It's true that the ending isn't satisfying. I wouldn't want it any other way.
Forcestalker
Many reviewers have given a variety of opinions, so I will confione myself to an issue I have with the novel. It should have been written as a group of short stories, like Lipsyte's "The Fun Parts," and not as a novel. The ostensible protagonist, Milo Burke, is much too weak. He is as forgettable as the mediocre liberal arts college for which he tries to make money. Lipsyte manages to create a few humorous scenes in his novel, but the vast majority of scenes are simply bleak because Milo is not really there. He's the anti-hero who is perpetually at someone else's mercy. This gets tiresome and unfunny. Lipsyte does mange to touch on some important issues, how we raise our children for example, but in order for this novel to work for me, Milo needs to grow a pair.
lucky kitten
Author Sam Lipsyte looms large as a star in the "N+1" firmament and is a well-regarded author of several short novels. Slate.com voted "The Ask" one of the best books of 2010. I think "The New Yorker" liked it, too.

"The Ask" depicts the crummy, vacuous, trite, dead-end life of middle-aged schmuck. He is a glorified paper-pusher expected to be a sycophant grateful for employment in a crummy, third-rate, pretentious New York university. Milo Burke disdains his crummy, vacuous, trite dead-end job. He ends up living in a crummy basement as a crummy, vacuous, trite helicopter parent appendage to his precocious and ever obnoxious kid and his rank, self-absorbed, smug wife.

The protagonist, the bitterly satirical Milo, apparently believes he is sort of a SNAG (sensitive new age guy) version of Charles Bukowski's alter-ego, Chinaski. Unlike Chinaski, however, Milo is an ineffectual, self-obsessed post-Yuppie whose artistic pretensions and vaguely bohemian ambitions have been thwarted by his own banal and insipid personality. Also unlike Chinaski, Milo is unable to use drugs, porn and lowlife pretensions to great effect. He doesn't even sneer or spit.

Predictably, a dude like Milo bobbing about in modern American office-land, has been virtually fore-ordained to follow a relentlessly downward trajectory but he's unable to capitalize on that. When, in the office, he makes a few lacerating comments to an "ask's" daughter, pegging her as a pompous flake he fails to follow-up with a Chinaski-like flip-off to the office manager. Almost immediately, he is out-on-the-street but has no "cred" for having made a valiant effort to fight the PC police and Make a Point. He gains a brief reprieve from the dreaded oblivion of unemployment, but job security is contingent on his ability to secure a major monetary donation for Mediocre University from a former (very wealthy) college friend, Purdy. If this grail can be obtained, all will be well back in his office cubicle. Maybe his wife won't even be so "all touched out". But, in the end success eludes poor Milo and he takes a proletarian-type job (like Chinaski in the Post Office) working as a part-time deck builder.

"The Ask" has a somewhat juvenile and flippant cast, perhaps by intention. Its glib and facile. The book is rife with absurd juxtapositions which are intended to be humorous (they often are). It is filled with bizarre characters (Milo's pretentious, lesbian mother; Purdy's "love child" Don, an Iraq War veteran with tandem titanium legs; Vargina, with the giant boobs; Purdy, the rich "ask" himself and his "Pulp Fiction" sidekick, Michael Florida; and a host of others), intended to display the idiocy of modern American life (he succeeds). The story and the manner of its telling, is imbued with the Ira Glass ("This American Life") approach. That is, it has a vague aroma of patronizing sanctimony to it (probably not the author's intent).

This book is like a Generation-X version of Woody Allen and its protagonist is most strongly reminiscent of the character Woody portrays in "Annie Hall." Despite some similiarities of intent and style, the book lacks the panache of Woody and the sting of Bukowski. Lipsyte succeeds by employing relentless sarcasm as a form of social commentary, but maybe that's because popular culture is so inane and therefore is so easy to satirize.
Moronydit
"The Ask" by Sam Lipsyte was named one of the New York Times 100 Notables Books of 2010. And it is easy to understand why after reading this dark, eloquently written masterpiece that takes the reader on an adventure through the life of several what I would call sad and complicated characters.

Milo is the primary character in this book. He is employed at a second or possibly third-rate univertsity in their Development department tasked with "asking" for money from potential donors who could make large "gives" to the Arts program. Through a series of somewhat odd and random happenings, Milo is fired from this position but is later reinstated in order to make one more very big ask of a former college roomate and friend who he has lost touch with over the years. His friend Purdy is fabulously rich but equally odd in so many ways and the rest of the story takes the reader through the craziness of this "ask" and Purdy's subsequent demands of his old friend. There is also a really good set of threads about Milo's relationship with his wife and his son that mimic a lot of experiences that I am sure the reader has had as well.

Overall I was incredibly impressed with the writing style of Lipsyte. His use of words was both eloquent and funny. You find yourself laughing out loud and also cringing. He is able to make vivid in the reader's mind images that in some cases you really don't always want to make vivid. He puts words together that likely shouldn't go together but when they do you say "wow that was genius."

I highly recommend The Ask for any strong reader of contemporary literature. If you want a funny and sensitive read--this one is definitely a must-read.