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Free eBook Unseen Academicals: Limited Collectors Edition (Discworld) download

by Terry Pratchett

Free eBook Unseen Academicals: Limited Collectors Edition (Discworld) download ISBN: 0385617828
Author: Terry Pratchett
Publisher: Doubleday UK; 1st edition (2009)
Language: English
Pages: 400
Category: Imaginative Literature
Subcategory: Humor and Satire
Size MP3: 1577 mb
Size FLAC: 1724 mb
Rating: 4.6
Format: rtf txt lit lrf


This gorgeous collection is currently complete up to Unseen Academicals, with Snuff & Raising Steam due for release next year

This gorgeous collection is currently complete up to Unseen Academicals, with Snuff & Raising Steam due for release next year.

Publisher: Transworld Publishers Ltd ISBN: 9780857525932.

1. UNSEEN ACADEMICALS. Book Description Doubleday, London, 2009.

ISBN 13: 9780385617826. 1. Published by Doubleday, London (2009). ISBN 10: 0385617828 ISBN 13: 9780385617826. Seller Inventory 11623.

Unseen Academicals book. In Unseen Academicals, Pratchett is back to his top form. Most readers consider the last few Discworld novels to be good, though not great. Perhaps, a break from Discworld to write the wonderful and thought provoking Nation was what he needed.

Unseen academicals by terry pratchet 2009 hardback in. .The Discworld series: Unseen academicals by Terry Pratchett (Hardback). Terry Pratchett Hardback Book.

Unseen academicals by terry pratchet 2009 hardback in exellent condition 312556280534.

Also by Terry Pratchett. This book is dedicated to Rob Wilkins, who typed most of it and had the good sense to laugh occasionally. And to Colin Smythe for his encouragement. The chant of the goddess Pedestriana is a parody of the wonderful poem ‘Brahma’ by Ralph Waldo Emerson, but of course you knew that anyway. Note from the Publisher. For extra information on the folklore background to Unseen Academicals, see The Folklore of Discworld.

Unseen Academicals (Discworld, Published November 10th 2009 by Transworld Digital. Discworld Collector's Library, Hardcover, 544 pages. Author(s): Terry Pratchett.

Title: Unseen Academicals (Discworld Novel 37). Author: Terry Pratchett. And now, the wizards of Unseen University must win a football match, without using magic, so they're in the mood for trying everything else. Unseen Academicals: (Discworld Novel 37) by Terry Pratchett (Paperback, 2014). Brand new: lowest price.

Sir Terry Pratchett was the internationally bestselling author of more than thirty books, including his phenomenally .

Sir Terry Pratchett was the internationally bestselling author of more than thirty books, including his phenomenally successful Discworld series. His young adult novel, The Amazing Maurice and His Educated Rodents, won the Carnegie Medal, and Where's My Cow?, his Discworld book for readers of all ages, was a New York Times bestseller. The latest burst of genius and chaos from Terry Pratchett, Unseen Academicals finds its inspiration in the world of soccer and obsessive fandom, as an obscure regulation forces the wizards of Unseen University to form a team to prevent losing their funding.

The latest burst of genius and chaos from Terry Pratchett, Unseen Academicals finds its inspiration in the world of soccer and obsessive fandom, as an obscure regulation forces the wizards of Unseen University to form a team to prevent losing their funding. How all of this ties into modeling contracts, a very unusual goblin, street gang rivalries, the ever-present influence of Vetinari, the Librarian's theories of banana location, and more - well, that's the joy of Pratchett incarnate, as all of these threads and more come together in incredibly satisfying and fun ways.

User reviews
Hucama
While there are allusions to violence (an assassins guild, bad guys arrested, sometimes people die) and sex (a guild of ladies of negotiable affection, light references to adult behaviors), Terry handles them in a way that would make these books appropriate for even pre-teens. It has less double entendres than your basic Disney movie. Also, they have less "descriptive information" about sex or violence than your basic health or gym class.
Terry writes his books in a way that will make you laugh (and think!) I would not call the Discworld novels “fantasy” in so much as I would refer to them as satirical intellectual comedy.
Agamaginn
I am totally biased when I say this is one of the greatest books ever written... since I say that only because Terry Pratchett is one of my favorite authors and the Discworld Series is my favorite series bar none! This book is my favorite book in the series. Though you will enjoy this book on its own, you might have to read a few of the books to really understand the true genius of this one... since there are many references to other books / characters in other stories. This is fun, clever, irreverent, fast paced action... and you will be so sad when you close the book that you will likely immediately begin another in the series.
Urllet
This lacks the fascination of Pratchett's usual quality. The humorous footnotes were largely missing and the plot seemed reliant on pre-existing jokes (the Librarian's athletic abilities, Rincewind's running speed, Vetinari's machinations). The central character for the sub-plot is from the Uberwald and has an interesting story but it lacks the depth and humour I would expect. It was fun to read more about Discworld but Pratchett's declining health is apparent in the quality.
Ohatollia
In the "Star Trek: The Next Generation" series there was an episode called "Lower Decks" that focused on a group of young people serving in minor positions on the Enterprise instead of the usual group of head honchos. That is essentially what happens in "Unseen Academicals" which focuses on the people who work in the Night Kitchen and the candle vats of Unseen University, the school for wizards in the city of Ankh-Morpork.

Ostensibly though the book is about the game of foot-the-ball or football (or soccer as we call it across the Pond). In Ankh-Morpork, the game of foot-the-ball is actually more like rugby, with a lot of tackling and fighting and very little scoring. Young Trevor Likely's father was a legend because he scored 4 goals.

Trevor works in the candle vats of Unseesn University with Nutt, a very learned goblin who talks like a shelf of self-help books. Nutt has a Mysterious Past that not even he remembers. Eventually though Trev and Nutt go up to the Night Kitchen, where they meet the plain, fat Glenda and the beautiful, ditzy Juliet.

As it happens Juliet is from the Stoops family, who are sworn enemies of Trev's family because of their foot-the-ball allegiances. Trev & Juliet doesn't play out like Romeo & Juliet because tragedy is not ever really on the menu in the Discworld. Nutt does a little Cyrano in writing a poem to help woo Juliet, which would work better if Juliet could read words of more than one syllable.

Oh yes, there is a football game in there too. The wizards of Unseen University discover that they have to play a game of football in order to keep a bequest that keeps their Night Kitchen stocked. (If there's one thing wizards really like it's their kitchen.) When some new old rules are "discovered" from a museum, a new brand of foot-the-ball is born with Nutt taking the lead as coach.

This book utilizes two recurring theme-like items in the Discworld series. One is equal rights/tolerance, which is embodied by Nutt. Goblins (or what Nutt really is) being the latest in a line that includes dwarfs, trolls, werewolves, vampires, and golems who break the racial barrier in Ankh-Morpork. The other theme-like substance is modernizing the city. The police force, post office, bank, and Unseen University itself have all been dramatically remodeled since the earliest Discworld novels. As well football joins other modern things like newspapers, movies, the Internet, and rock music to become part of the fabric of Disc society. So really while the book is entertaining (as most Discworld books are) it's not anything fans of the series haven't really seen before.

What bugged me about the previous book "Making Money" was that there was no money made in it; the actual printing of money seemed like it would be taking place off the pages. I feared that Pratchett was going to do the same here and have the football game take place off the page, but he does at least manage to get it in, even if it is a bit underwhelming. While it was nice to see Rincewind (with a cameo by The Luggage) and the Librarian again, I wish they could have been used more.

That the book doesn't focus on any of the major characters in the end means that this can be filed away as "Minor Discworld" along with one-offs like "Pyramids," "Small Gods," "The Truth," and "Monstrous Regiment." Since football (soccer) hooliganism isn't a big thing here in the States, I'm sure some of the jokes in this one went over my head; British readers would then probably enjoy this more.

Still, it's not a bad entry in the series, but not an overly important one either. You could do a lot worse.

That is all.
Twentyfirstfinger
How does a person gain worth? And why do we compel those not like us do this? Why should a living person have to justify living? Is life so cheap that every one isn't precious and to be carefully protected. Some days I despair at our crowd mentality that we will never be more than self predators. Pratchett lifts me beyond despair to hope. For a happy ending
Alsanadar
The latest burst of genius and chaos from Terry Pratchett, Unseen Academicals finds its inspiration in the world of soccer and obsessive fandom, as an obscure regulation forces the wizards of Unseen University to form a team to prevent losing their funding. How all of this ties into modeling contracts, a very unusual goblin, street gang rivalries, the ever-present influence of Vetinari, the Librarian's theories of banana location, and more - well, that's the joy of Pratchett incarnate, as all of these threads and more come together in incredibly satisfying and fun ways. The only real complaint I have about Unseen Academicals is that it's a little too sprawling, as though Pratchett had a few too many ideas and tried to cram them all in. But a book with too many ideas is infinitely preferable to one with not enough, and when they're housed in a book with such marvelous, rich characters and Pratchett's brilliant prose, that's a very, very minor complaint. Here is a book where funny and smart lines like "Cleanliness was next to godliness, which was to say it was erratic, past all understanding, and was seldom seen" are the norm, not the exception; a book where the characters, no matter how strange and inventive, are recognizably alive; and the story manages to be both funny and profound with ease. In short, it's just another testament to Pratchett's genius and talent.