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Free eBook Bede: Ecclesiastical History, Books I-III (Loeb Classical Library No. 246) (Volume I) download

by Bede,John Edward King

Free eBook Bede: Ecclesiastical History, Books I-III (Loeb Classical Library No. 246) (Volume I) download ISBN: 0674992717
Author: Bede,John Edward King
Publisher: Harvard University Press; Reprint edition (January 1, 1930)
Language: English
Pages: 560
Category: Imaginative Literature
Subcategory: History and Criticism
Size MP3: 1945 mb
Size FLAC: 1505 mb
Rating: 4.7
Format: mobi doc lrf txt


There are two books of Bede's Ecclesiastical History. This book is an oddity.

There are two books of Bede's Ecclesiastical History. The Loeb series really doesn't cover any other non-Roman authors. The closest it comes is covering Procopius, who wrote a recognizably Classical work in the Eastern Empire after the fall of Rome. This book was written around the year 700 (150 years after Procopius) in Anglo-Saxon England. Bede's view of British history was that God punished the British for their sins by bringing in the Saxons who he then saved by sending them Saint Augustine and converting them into good Christians. This is an Ecclesiastical history which means it covers political events only superficially.

by Bede (Author), John Edward King (Translator). This item:Bede: Ecclesiastical History, Books IV-V. ISBN-13: 978-0674992733. Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). In stock on November 7, 2018.

Ecclesiastical History, Volume I: Books 1-3. Translated by J. E. King. Loeb Classical Library 246.

Title Page i. latin table of contents vii. introduction xv. Ecclesiastical History of the English Nation. Ecclesiastical History, Volume I: Books 1-3. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1930.

Ecclesiastical History, Volume I, Books I-III (Loeb Classical Library No. 246).

Tacitus: Histories, Books IV-V, Annals Books I-III (Loeb Classical Library No. 249). of at least twelve books covering the period 69–96 CE, but only Books I–IV and part of Book. 27 MB·187 Downloads·New! of at least twelve books covering the period 69–96 CE, but only Books I–IV and part of Book. Ecclesiastical History, Volume I, Books I-III (Loeb Classical Library No. 92 MB·57 Downloads·New! and chronology. But his most admired production is his Ecclesiastical History of the English Nation. Ecclesiastical History, Volume II, Books IV-V.

No current Talk conversations about this book. Work-to-work relationships.

You may be interested in. Eusebius: Ecclesiastical History, Volume II, Books 6-10 (Loeb Classical Library No. 265). File: PDF, 1. 0 MB. The Library, Volume I: Books 1-. (Loeb Classical Library Ecclesiastical History, Volume I, Books I-III (Loeb Classical Library No. 2 MB. Discourses, Volume I, Books 1-2 (Loeb Classical Library). Oldfather (e. Год: 1925.

Ecclesiastical History, Books I-III book . Stores ▾. Audible Barnes & Noble Walmart eBooks Apple Books Google Play Abebooks Book Depository Alibris Indigo Better World Books IndieBound Simon & Schuster. Hardcover, 560 pages. Published January 1st 1930 by Loeb Classical Library (first published 731).

The Loeb Classical Library (LCL; named after James Loeb /loʊb/) is a series of books, originally published by Heinemann in London, today by Harvard University Press.

Bede 'the Venerable,' English theologian and historian, was born in 672 or 673 CE in the territory of the single monastery at Wearmouth and Jarrow. He was ordained deacon (691–2) and priest (702–3) of the monastery, where his whole life was spent in devotion, choral singing, study, teaching, discussion, and writing. Besides Latin he knew Greek and possibly Hebrew.

Bede's theological works were chiefly commentaries, mostly allegorical in method, based with acknowledgment on Jerome, Augustine, Ambrose, Gregory, and others, but bearing his own personality. In another class were works on grammar and one on natural phenomena; special interest in the vexed question of Easter led him to write about the calendar and chronology. But his most admired production is his Ecclesiastical History of the English Nation. Here a clear and simple style united with descriptive powers to produce an elegant work, and the facts diligently collected from good sources make it a valuable account.

Historical also are his Lives of the Abbots of his monastery, the less successful accounts (in verse and prose) of Cuthbert, and the Letter (November 734) to Egbert his pupil, so important for our knowledge about the Church in Northumbria.

The Loeb Classical Library edition of Bede's historical works is in two volumes.

User reviews
mIni-Like
great book - great transaction
thrust
I am fully satisfied with the purchase. Thanks!
elektron
Since there are so many of these darn things the review shall be divided into three sections. First, a brief description of the Loeb series of books and their advantages/disadvantages. Second shall be my thoughts on the author himself, his accuracy, as well as his style and the style of his translator. This is of course only my opinion and should be treated as such. The final part shall review what this particular book actually covers.

The Loeb series date back to the turn of the last century. They are designed for people with at least some knowledge of Greek or Latin. They are a sort of compromise between a straight English translation and an annotated copy of the original text. On the left page is printed the text in Greek or Latin depending on the language of the writer and on the right side is the text in English. For somebody who knows even a little Greek or Latin these texts are invaluable. You can try to read the text in the original language knowing that you can correct yourself by looking on the next page or you can read the text in translation and check the translation with the original for more detail. While some of the translations are excellent mostly they are merely serviceable since they are designed more as an aid to translation rather than a translation in themselves. Most of them follow the Greek or Latin very closely. These books are also very small, maybe just over a quarter the size of your average hardcover book. This means that you'll need to buy more than just one book to read a complete work. They are also somewhat pricey considering their size. The Loeb Collection is very large but most of the more famous works can be found in better (and cheaper) translations elsewhere. If you want to read a rarer book or read one in the original language then you can't do better than the Loeb Editions.

There are two books of Bede's Ecclesiastical History. This book is an oddity. The Loeb series really doesn't cover any other non-Roman authors. The closest it comes is covering Procopius, who wrote a recognizably Classical work in the Eastern Empire after the fall of Rome. This book was written around the year 700 (150 years after Procopius) in Anglo-Saxon England. Bede was a monk who wrote what serves as the only source for England in this period. The amount of effort that Bede put into dating everything according to the new AD system which he basically invented (or at least standardized) is extraordinary. This man had access to a LOT of source material. Whether you agree with his interpretations or not (probably not) this work represents the greatest effort of a brilliant mind. Bede's view of British history was that God punished the British for their sins by bringing in the Saxons who he then saved by sending them Saint Augustine and converting them into good Christians. This is an Ecclesiastical history which means it covers political events only superficially. There are other works by Bede although I've never seen them, but the other volume is located here.

This volume covers the early history of Britain up through the Saxon conquest. It also deals with the arrival of Augustine. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle covers this period as well in rather vague detail, but apart from that the history of Britain from c. 530-880 is a complete blank with the exception of several undateable literary works and saints' lives. The earlier period is covered (poorly) by Gildas,St. Patrick, and Constantius of Lyons, as well as the much later authors Nennius and Geoffrey of Monmouth whose works are filled with uncertain and often fictitious material (especially Geoffrey). Bede used Gildas as a source, but beyond that his sources for this period were uncertain even though they were only two hundred years before his time. He's on rather more steady footing when it comes to anything after the arrival of Augustine (c. 600) since here he is describing events after the introduction of literacy into Anglo-Saxon England and often within living memory.
Zeli
I have an older printing of this book, 1999. I like Loeb Classics because of the Latin text. I am very disappointed in the quality of the new printing, which is much reduced from the old. It is fuzzy and parts of letters are missing, making it difficult to read. The new paper is whiter in color and feels lighter weight. I liked the old heavy paper with a cream color and am frustrated with Loeb for dropping the ball on this one.

From a reader's standpoint the translation is fine, but the English might be a bit antiquated or difficult for some readers. When I chose not to buy the second volume due to the reduced quality I found the Oxford World's Classics McClure/Collins Edition to be more lively.

The Ecclesiastical History was very interesting from several standpoints. The relationship between the Church at Rome, Gaul, England, and Ireland was very interesting, as was the discussion of their respective traditions. Bede goes into detail about the controversy between the Irish church and English/Catholic church regarding Easter. His stories about the Holy Men and Women were very well written. He is an excellent teacher, the book is well constructed, and the text very self-explanatory, requiring little background knowledge.