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by Shambhala

Free eBook The Zen Teachings of Master Lin-Chi (Shambhala Dragon Editions) download ISBN: 0877738912
Author: Shambhala
Publisher: Shambhala; 1st edition (August 31, 1993)
Language: English
Pages: 112
Category: Imaginative Literature
Subcategory: History and Criticism
Size MP3: 1104 mb
Size FLAC: 1712 mb
Rating: 4.3
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This little book contains a collection of short quotes, anecdotes and remarks by Chinese Zen masters ranging from the eight to. .

This little book contains a collection of short quotes, anecdotes and remarks by Chinese Zen masters ranging from the eight to the fourteenth century. The quotes are very to the point and do not appear dated. The translation seems clear and modern and the collection is concentrated. Thomas Cleary has selected brief teachings from 18 great Zen Masters, beginning with Ma-tsu in the 8th century, ending with Yüan-sou in the 14th, keeping infallibly to what is assimilable and useful for present-day readers or practitioners, rather than the impenetrably Ancient Chinese or the -Wall baffling.

The book, compiled by Lin-chi's disciples, describes the life and teaching of this eminent Zen master and includes a number of his sermons, noted for their brisk and colorful . ix. The Zen Teachings 0/ Master Lin-chi APPENDIX.

Categories: Psychology\Pedagogy. Edisi: 1st. Penerbit: Shambhala.

The Zen Teachings of Master Lin-Chi.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Hui-neng (638–713) is perhaps the most beloved and respected figure in Zen Buddhism. The Zen Teachings of Master Lin-Chi.

The teachings of Lin-chi can be a rough ride for those who are attracted to the more flowery descriptions of paths to.Lin-chi (Rinzai) speaks in a clear manner easy to understand

The teachings of Lin-chi can be a rough ride for those who are attracted to the more flowery descriptions of paths to enlightenment and nirvana encountered elsewhere. The reader is more likely to be confronted with Lin-chi's infamous shouts and blows that may resemble Cher slapping Nicholas Cage in the movie Moonstruck and telling him to "snap out of it!" more than the airy, comforting words used by some of today's teachers and practitioners. Lin-chi (Rinzai) speaks in a clear manner easy to understand.

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This book describes the following items: Zen Buddhism Early Works To 1800, We found some servers for you, where you can download the e-book "The Zen teachings of Master Lin-chi" by I-Hsüan TXT for free. The Free Books Online team wishes you a fascinating reading! Please, select your region to boost load speed

Lin-chi's style of Zen - encouraging the use of unorthodox teaching . Published August 31st 1993 by Shambhala (first published 1120).

Lin-chi's style of Zen - encouraging the use of unorthodox teaching methods and stressing the importance of koan study - is well known to Western readers and scholars, and is beautifully rendered in Watson's translation. In The Zen Teachings of Master Lin-Chi (1993/1999) Burton Watson translates one of the most important texts in the Ch'an tradition, the Lin-chi ch'an-shih yü-lu (The Recorded Saying of the Ch'an Master Lin-Chi) and includes a useful introduction providing historical and cultural context, as well as explanatory notes to the text itself.

Renowned scholar Burton Watson's translation exactingly depicts the life and teachings of the great ninth-century Chinese Zen master Lin-chi, one of the most highly regarded of the T'ang period masters. About the Author: Burton Watson, the recipient of the 1981 PEN Translation Prize, has taught Chinese and Japanese literature at Columbia, Stanford, and Kyoto universities.

The Way of Energy: Mastering the Chinese Art of Internal Strength with Chi Kung Exercise.

Категория: Психология, Педагогика. The Way of Energy: Mastering the Chinese Art of Internal Strength with Chi Kung Exercise. Master Lam Kam-Chuen. Категория: Техника, Энергетика, Возобновляемая энергетика.

The Zen verses came from the book: The Zen Teachings of Master Lin - Chi. Translated by: Burton Watson

The Zen verses came from the book: The Zen Teachings of Master Lin - Chi. Translated by: Burton Watson.

An important classic of Zen literature, written by one of the great Zen masters of ancient China. The book, compiled by Lin-chi's disciples, describes the life and teaching of this eminent Zen master and includes a number of his sermons, noted for their brisk and colorful language.S.
User reviews
Alianyau
While this is no Zen Teachings of Huang Po, there are statements made herein that strike the brain faster and harder than most other teachings. I was reluctant to buy it, because Huang Po would have hit me for doing so, and Lin Chi likely would have done the same. Regardless, I wanted to see what Lin Chi had to say about Real stuff, and I was repaid for my curiosity.

This book is short and is divided into several sections. Some are the usual - Zen master is asked a question, Zen master hits questioner or shouts or does something other than provide a direct, conceptual reply. Questioner walks away puzzled and reader falls asleep with half empty beer in hand. One section, on the other hand, consists of Lin Chi giving actual brain-shaking speeches that are even more forceful and direct than Huang Po himself. This section (Section Two) makes this book worth the purchase price, even if you are a true simpleton who understands that any advice is simply better than current ignorance but nowhere near real comprehension.

I find it hard to recommend a book on Zen when I myself never plan on reading it again myself, but it works better than the 4 million Zen teachers who make a living writing books on how Zen applies to cleaning your house. I guess that's worth something.
Zepavitta
The teachings of Lin-chi can be a rough ride for those who are attracted to the more flowery descriptions of paths to enlightenment and nirvana encountered elsewhere. The reader is more likely to be confronted with Lin-chi's infamous shouts and blows that may resemble Cher slapping Nicholas Cage in the movie Moonstruck and telling him to "snap out of it!" more than the airy, comforting words used by some of today's teachers and practitioners. This is not to suggest that Cher is an enlightened Zen master, but metaphors often come from unexpected places! Lin-chi himself does not hesitate to resort to extreme hyperbole, violent metaphor and scatological references in order to emphatically make a point.

It was Lin-chi who borrowed the Taoist term "chen-jen" (buji-nin in Japanese) to describe the "Natural or True Man of No Rank." Bu and chen refer to the unparticularized and uncontrived, while nin and jen literally mean man or person. His emphasis on being natural and "doing nothing" is often misinterpreted as being a slacker rather than his stated intention in pointing out the potential pitfalls of becoming entangled in the rituals and trappings of overly conceptualized practices. Unfortunately, today's institutionalized Zen schools have misappropriated the term "Buji-Zen" and apply it in a derogatory manner to those who are lazy or frivolous in their approach to individual practice.

The reader will realize early on that the "father of Rinzai Zen" was neither frivolous nor lazy. His teaching is strong medicine, with no sugar offered to help the medicine go down. Highly recommended.
GAMER
This is probally one of the best Zen books I've ever read!!! Lin-chi (Rinzai) speaks in a clear manner easy to understand. Like a true master he knows how to get straight to the "heart" of Zen. It's no wonder a school of Zen is named after him.
Yannara
great books!
Butius
If you place faith in these one-size-fits-all, fill-out-the-form reviews of books, you will get what you deserve.
Jeronashe
Nishida Kitaro, famous modern Japanese philosopher, founder of the influential Kyoto School, and expert on Mahayana Buddhism, once made the remark that if he were stranded on some remote island (Gilligan's Island? Where's the Skipper?) with only a couple books in his possession, one of them would be the Rinzai Roku (Chinese: Linji Lu).

High praise indeed. And a sentiment shared by me, a lesser thinker than Nishida. There is simply something special in this book's extraordinary insight and power that comes shining through in these discourses (I grant here recent scholarship's insights into the formation of the Linji Lu legend during the Song Period, but undoubtably Linji was an important figure himself). Presenting such a powerful message, it is no wonder the Linji school became the leading Zen sect in Japan down through history. If you, dear reader, have no knowledge of Mahayana insights, just start here. Never mind the colorful anecdotes in the book where Linji is slapping or yelling at everybody, just concentrate on the sermons. The Linji Lu will literally turn you into a Mahayana powerhouse yourself if you ponder the discourses long enough. It can well serve as a "primer" on Mahayana doctrines...

Anyway, back to this translation. There have been several other translations into English, one by Irmgard Schloegl and another by Ruth Fuller Sasaki's team in Japan (both of which are hard to get nowdays in original form). And also a current one by Zen teacher Eido Shimano, and one by JC Cleary...there may be more. I've got all these versions, but I still like Burton Watson's translation the best. To me, Watson has done a masterful job rendering the Linji Lu into coherent English, no easy feat with this type of literature. He is simply a great translator.

As for the Linji Lu's place in world religious literature, I personally think it belongs up there near the top as far as a clear presentation of Mahayana doctrines. I realize mostly zen practitioners, scholars, and Buddhist fans will be the only ones interested in wading through these old Chinese works, but that is really a shame in a lot of ways. If scriptures like the Bible, Koran, and other familiar texts belong to classic world literature, and they do, so do powerful works less-familiar to the Western public, such as the Linji Lu, Dogen's Shobogenzo, the Hua-Yen Sutra, etc.

It is my feeling that anyone interested in expanding one's perceptual horizons needs to come to terms with the great Yu-Lu ("recorded sayings") literature from the T'ang/Song Periods in China, of which this book is representative. In particular, the Hong-Zhou line of Mazu, to which Linji belonged, became quite (in)famous for their emphasis on zen "functioning" in daily life. There is an old Chan saying which reminds us, "what comes in through the gates is not the family treasure...". In other words, your circumstances, and the constant bombardment of external stimuli from your environment, shouldn't be allowed to bind you (as they invariably do) from being a free human being. As Linji himself might have demanded, where is the "true human of no conditions"? Alas, we're all guilty these days, too bad Linji isn't around to slap us. Here- I'll do it for him (slaps lazy Amazon reader, who is nodding off reading this review...
Azago
This record of Lin Chi, very well translated by Burton Watson, has served to point straight to the heart of Zen for hundreds of years. Lin Chi employs no flowery words and has no patience for metaphysical speculation. He is down to earth. This book will likely be useful for seasoned zen students. There is not much here to guide a beginning student , and they will very likely be left quite confused-as illustrated by the one star reviewer!