» » Dilution Anxiety and the Black Phallus

Free eBook Dilution Anxiety and the Black Phallus download

by Margo Natalie Crawford

Free eBook Dilution Anxiety and the Black Phallus download ISBN: 0814251684
Author: Margo Natalie Crawford
Publisher: Ohio State University Press; 2 edition (August 22, 2008)
Language: English
Pages: 224
Category: Imaginative Literature
Subcategory: History and Criticism
Size MP3: 1136 mb
Size FLAC: 1596 mb
Rating: 4.7
Format: mobi docx mbr lrf


Dilution Anxiety and the Black Phallus is an original contribution to African American and race studies by focusing on the representation of shades of ‘blackness’, rather than on the now-tired dichotomy of blackness/whiteness. There has been no other full-length literary treatment giving sustained attention to the representation of shades of skin color and their acquired meanings. Margo Natalie Crawford is an associate professor in the W. E. B. Du Bois Department of Afro-American Studies at University of t.

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Start by marking Dilution Anxiety and the Black Phallus as Want to Read . After the Black is Beautiful movement of the 1960s, black body politics have been overdetermined by both the familiar fetishism of light skin as well as the counter-fetishism of dark skin

Start by marking Dilution Anxiety and the Black Phallus as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. After the Black is Beautiful movement of the 1960s, black body politics have been overdetermined by both the familiar fetishism of light skin as well as the counter-fetishism of dark skin. Moving beyond the longstanding focus on the tragic mulatta and making room for the study of the fetishism of both light-skinned and dark-skinned blackness, Margo Natalie Crawford analy After the Black is Beautiful movement of the 1960s, black body politics have been overdetermined by both the familiar fetishism of light skin as well as the counter-fetishism of dark skin.

MARGO NATALIE CRAWFORD is the author of Dilution Anxiety and the Black Phallus (Ohio State University Press, 2008)

MARGO NATALIE CRAWFORD is the author of Dilution Anxiety and the Black Phallus (Ohio State University Press, 2008) New Thoughts on the Black Arts Movement is a terrific treatment of one of the most influential literary phenomena of the late 20th century. The Introduction alone is worth the price of the book. Addressing both the weaknesses and strengths of the BAM in a balanced and truly revisionary fashion, this collection will make a mark. And it's a good read, too!

Margo Natalie Crawford, P.

Margo Natalie Crawford, P. studies 20th and 21st century African American literature and the full interdisciplinary spin of global black studies  .

oceedings{AA, title {Dilution Anxiety and the Black Phallus}, author {Margo Natalie Crawford}, year {2008} }. Margo Natalie Crawford.

Dilution anxiety and the black phallus, Margo Natalie Crawford. he book gained wings during my graduate studies at Yale Univer-sity with the invaluable guidance of Margaret Homans and Robert Stepto. p. cm. Includes bibliographical references and index. I thank them for the type of dialogue and feedback that greatly enriched every layer of this project. At Yale, Laura Wexler taught a seminar, Photography and the Body, that propelled my initial work with Black Arts movement photography.

After the Black is Beautiful movement of the 1960s, black body politics . and the Black Phallus, Crawford adds images of skin color dilution a. .

After the Black is Beautiful movement of the 1960s, black body politics have been overdetermined by both the familiar fetishism of light skin as well as the counter-fetishism of dark skin. Moving beyond the longstanding focus on the tragic mulatta and making room for the study of the fetishism of both light-skinned and dark-skinned blackness, Margo Natalie Crawford analyzes depictions of colorism in the work of Gertrude Stein, Wallace Thurman, William Faulkner, Black Arts poets, James Baldwin, Toni Morrison, and John Edgar Wideman

Author Margo Natalie Crawford examines who is black, the 'one-drop . Books critiques the sexual consumption of dark-skinned blackness and the beauty attributed to light-skinned blackness.

Author Margo Natalie Crawford examines who is black, the 'one-drop rule' and the black power movement. The dilution anxiety of the Black Arts movement is encapsulated in the poems "The Self-Hatred of Don L. Lee," 1963, written by Haki Madhubuti, and "The Life of Lincoln West," written by Gwendolyn Brooks in 1963 and published in 1970. The Self-Hatred of Don L. Lee" celebrates the quote "all-black interior" as it explains the fetishism of dark skinned blackness during the Black Arts movement.

Crawford, Margo Natalie. Dilution Anxiety and the Black Phallus, Columbus: Ohio State University Press, 2008. The Collage Aesthetic in the Harlem Renaissance, Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2009. Macon, Wanda Celeste. Adolescent Characters' Sexual Behavior in Selected Fiction of Six Twentieth Century African American Authors, 1992.

After the “Black is Beautiful” movement of the 1960s, black body politics have been overdetermined by both the familiar fetishism of light skin as well as the counter-fetishism of dark skin. Moving beyond the longstanding focus on the tragic mulatta and making room for the study of the fetishism of both light-skinned and dark-skinned blackness, Margo Natalie Crawford analyzes depictions of colorism in the work of Gertrude Stein, Wallace Thurman, William Faulkner, Black Arts poets, James Baldwin, Toni Morrison, and John Edgar Wideman. In Dilution Anxiety and the Black Phallus, Crawford adds images of skin color dilution as a type of castration to the field of race and psychoanalysis. An undercurrent of light-skinned blackness as a type of castration emerges within an ongoing story about the feminizing of light skin and the masculinizing of dark skin. Crawford confronts the web of beautified and eroticized brands and scars, created by colorism, crisscrossing race, gender, and sexuality. The depiction of the horror of these aestheticized brands and scars begins in the white-authored and black-authored modernist literature examined in the first chapters. A call for the end of the ongoing branding emerges with sheer force in the post–Black movement novels examined in the final chapters.