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Free eBook Nom de Plume: A (Secret) History of Pseudonyms download

by Carmela Ciuraru

Free eBook Nom de Plume: A (Secret) History of Pseudonyms download ISBN: 0061735272
Author: Carmela Ciuraru
Publisher: Harper Perennial; Reprint edition (May 29, 2012)
Language: English
Pages: 400
Category: Imaginative Literature
Subcategory: History and Criticism
Size MP3: 1254 mb
Size FLAC: 1640 mb
Rating: 4.5
Format: azw doc lrf rtf


ADVANCE PRAISE: " Nom de Plume is a fascinating collection of stories - populated by individuals .

ADVANCE PRAISE: " Nom de Plume is a fascinating collection of stories - populated by individuals whose 'doubleness' is so distinct that they acquire secondary personalities. Patricia Highsmith only wrote one book under a pseudonym, and therefore barely qualifies to be in this book, but her story is so peculiar, unpleasant, and irresistible, that Ciuraru had to include it. Mark Twain was not only the well-known pen name of Samuel Clemens, but was the smoother, friendlier version of the man.

Yet, as Nom de Plume reminds us, this was not always the case. Exploring the fascinating stories of more than a dozen authorial impostors across several centuries and cultures, Carmela Ciuraru plumbs the creative process and the darker, often crippling aspects of fame. Biographies have chronicled the lives of pseudonymous authors such as Mark Twain, Isak Dinesen, and George Eliot, but never before have the stories behind many noms de plume been collected into a single volume.

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Join CARMELA CIURARU, author of Nom de Plume: A (Secret) History of Pseudonyms; DARIN STRAUSS, author of Half a Life; ELISSA SCHAPPELL author of Blueprints for Building Better Girls; and BEN GREENMAN of The New Yorker, about why authors generate alternate identities. The evening includes a "nom de plume" audience contest. Co-sponsored by Artists & Audiences Exchange, a public program administered by the New York Foundation for the Arts (NYFA) with leadership support from the New York State Council on the Arts. Devamını Gör. Nom de Plume: A (Secret) History of Pseudonyms.

Nom de Plume: A (Secret) History of Pseudonyms. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere.

Автор: Ciuraru Carmela Название: Nom de Plume: A (Secret) History of Pseudonyms Издательство . Описание: This synthesis of recent moves to coordinate book sector planning and development, aims to fulfil two objectives.

Описание: This synthesis of recent moves to coordinate book sector planning and development, aims to fulfil two objectives. On the one hand, it seeks to describe the changing scenario in which book sector coordination has become necessary.

Carmela Ciuraru’s History of Pseudonyms. Nom de Plume is an interesting book, but by its very nature an odd one. After laying the groundwork in her thoughtful introduction, Ciuraru is left with not a great deal more to say about the pseudonyms her subjects adopted. There is little documentation about these choices and in some instances no testimony from the authors themselves. So there’s not much she can do except write thumbnail biographies of her 18 subjects.

Carmela Ciuraru takes a playful look at the history of pen names and the reasons .

Carmela Ciuraru takes a playful look at the history of pen names and the reasons authors us. .This question is at the heart of Carmela Ciuraru's Nom de Plume: A (Secret) History of Pseudonyms, a fascinating investigation of why writers use pen names. A change of name, much like a change of scenery, provides a chance to begin again.

MaryAnne Evans. Charles Dodgson. Eric Blair. William Sydney Porter. Or, as they aremore commonly remembered, George Eliot, Lewis Carroll, George Orwell, and O.Henry. For these writers and many others, from Mark Twain to Stan Lee to RobertJordan, the invocation of a nom de plume has been an essential part inthe creation of an authorial identity. Now, in a captivating series ofbiographical snapshots exploring the lives of famous authors and their pennames, author Carmela Ciuraru delivers a unique literaryhistory and a penetrating examination of identity, creativity, andself-creation, revisiting the enduring question—what’s in a name?

User reviews
Rageseeker
It was hard for me to get into this book, probably because I had little interest in some of the first writers discussed, but as I read more and more I became more interested. The author does a good job of providing condensed bios on the writers she discusses, along with the various reasons they adopted other names for their writings. If you aren't interested in writers or literature it might be hard to "get into" this book... which would be a shame because it does have a lot to offer.
Whitegrove
This has really good view of authors who chose to write under a pen name. Patricia HIghsmith is described as "the most wretched person you'd ever hope to meet", and you'd have to agree with that! Mostly the book is a side to these people that you won't read in their bios, and it makes them appear much more human.
Rivik
Good historical stuff!
Ese
I felt this book covered the subject matter very well and got me interested in finding out more which is all a book can ever do
Bolv
Excellent and as informative as I had expected.
Shalinrad
You could draw the conclusion, after reading this book, that writers who use pen names are weird. But that's probably not a fair conclusion. Author Carmela Ciuraru had a universe of writers with pen names to pick from and there was no point in picking the normal, boring ones.

Writers have different reasons for choosing pseudonyms, and Ciuraru seems to have picked the authors whose own identities were overshadowed by their alter egos, even in their own lifetimes. Perhaps the oddest of the bunch was Fernando Pessoa, who with over seventy identities, was a troubled and sick man. The Bronte sisters used men's names to maintain their anonymity and to give themselves an advantage in getting published. They were the least strange of the bunch.

My reading of Nom de Plume gravitated toward the authors whose works I have read and I was fascinated to read the story of Georges Simenon, who was busy enough to be at least a dozen men, but was astonishingly only one. He wrote an average of four books a year throughout his life and still had time to conduct multiple affairs. Obviously time management was a special talent of his.

Patricia Highsmith only wrote one book under a pseudonym, and therefore barely qualifies to be in this book, but her story is so peculiar, unpleasant, and irresistible, that Ciuraru had to include it.

Mark Twain was not only the well-known pen name of Samuel Clemens, but was the smoother, friendlier version of the man. Clemens was grumpy, depressed, and difficult, but Mark Twain was the funny, wry, publicly acceptable persona.

What surprised me was the number of writers who not only adopted pen names, but seemed to prefer their new identities to the old ones. Simenon was a pen name, but for at least half his life, he was Simenon almost exclusively, in public and private. George Orwell was another who became his alter ego, for the most part abandoning his birth name of Eric Blair.

Until recently, most of us who are not writers or con artists didn't need to worry about whether to use a false identity. Now, quite a lot of us adopt a user name or a blog avatar. It seems like a harmless and perhaps even a sensible thing to do. After reading Nom de Plume, you may think a bit harder about the meaning of hiding behind a mask.
Leyl
Think you know about your favorite authors? Guess again! Nom de Plume offers a fascinating look at some of my favorite writers of all time, as well as a compelling introduction to some authors that I hadn't heard of before.

Incredibly well written and just plain fun to read -each chapter is titled with some outrageous fact about the author featured in it; as I came to the end of a chapter and meant to set the book down, I found myself getting sucked into the next chapter, and then the next, and the next. I laughed, I cried, I cringed in disgust, but I just couldn't put the book down. I even felt a little sad when I finished reading it, wishing there was more- I would love for the author to write a sequel, perhaps including some more of my favorite Noms de Plume- Saki (Hector Hugh Munro), Agatha Christie (Mary Westmacott), Ayn Rand (Alisa Zinov'yevna Rosenbaum), to name a few.

Nom de Plume is a fantastic book that I'd recommend to just about anyone. Wonderful!
I am rarely thrilled by anything I read. This is both a function of having read all the good stuff, and a downright dearth of anything new worth reading. At last, I am able to report that I found my thrill, not on Blueberry Hill but in the obscure pleasures offered up by the ethereal Carmela Ciuraru in her brilliant (HarperCollins, thought so!) NOM DE PLUME: A (SECRET) HISTORY OF PSEUDONYMS. The adjective ethereal was not chose lightly. There is a photograph of Carmela on the back flap of the book cover. I am sure you would agree that hers is a face from Botticelli, a unique beauty, something deliriously ethnic in her face, and cerebral in her sweet, cynical smile.

It must be serendipitous that I should find this book within days of the breaking July, 2013 news of J.K. Rowling. Apparently she published her last novel--The Cuckoo's Calling--under the pseudonym John Galbraith. The story, of course, is probably a publisher-conceived media stunt. Each day it has built itself "legs" and the pundits & analysts are slicing & dicing as I write. It would be a great injustice to their viewers should the 24-hour news mavens not invite Carmela as a guest commentator on the issue of pseudonyms in general. The author is undoubtedly an articulate, charismatic, camera-ready treat.
I strongly advise whoever is scheduling guests to get on this right away

Her book is a nuanced analysis of various motivations behind an author's use of a pseudonym for publication. In addition to being a fascinating read, particularly for writers, NOM DE PLUME, it sets each story--and they're all there: Twain/Clemens, Blair/Orwell, Carroll/Dodgson, Dinesen/Blixen, Plath, Simenon, and Highsmith--sets each episode of literary schizophrenia in historical context. Quoting Carmela:

"At its most basic level, a pseudonym is a prank. Yet the motives that lead writers to assume an alias are infinitely complex, sometimes mysterious even to them."

The book is a gem and fun to read.