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Free eBook The Examinations of Anne Askew (Women Writers in English 1350-1850) download

by Elaine V. Beilin,Anne Askew

Free eBook The Examinations of Anne Askew (Women Writers in English 1350-1850) download ISBN: 0195108493
Author: Elaine V. Beilin,Anne Askew
Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (September 5, 1996)
Language: English
Pages: 264
Category: Imaginative Literature
Subcategory: History and Criticism
Size MP3: 1347 mb
Size FLAC: 1288 mb
Rating: 4.2
Format: rtf mobi docx mbr


-Sixteenth Century Journal.

-Sixteenth Century Journal.

Anne Askew (née Ayscough, Ascue; married name Anne Kyme; 1521 – 16 July 1546) was an English writer, poet, and Protestant martyr who was condemned as a heretic in England in the reign of Henry VIII of England

Anne Askew (née Ayscough, Ascue; married name Anne Kyme; 1521 – 16 July 1546) was an English writer, poet, and Protestant martyr who was condemned as a heretic in England in the reign of Henry VIII of England. Apart from Margaret Cheyne, wife of Sir John Bulmer, who was similarly tortured and executed after the Pilgrimage of Grace in 1537, she is the only other woman on record known to have been both tortured in the Tower of London and burnt at the stake.

In this vivid first-person narrative, Anne Askew (1521-1546), a member of. .Elaine V. Beilin is Associate Professor of English at Framingham State College.

In this vivid first-person narrative, Anne Askew (1521-1546), a member of the Reformed church, records her imprisonment for heresy and her interrogation by officials of church and state in the last days of Henry VIII.

Women Writers in English 1350-1850) (Anne Askew ) Ebook Online Free Download Read The Examinations of Anne Askew (Women Writers in English 1350-1850) (Anne Askew ) Ebook Online E-Reader Download Read The Examinations of Anne Askew (Women Writers in English 1350-1850) (Anne Askew ) Ebook Online in English.

Women Writers in English 1350-1850

Women Writers in English 1350-1850 The Examinations of Anne Askew. This new addition to the Women Writers in English series records Anne Askew's narrative of her imprisonment for heresy and her interrogation by officials of church and state in the last days of Henry VIII. As a spiritual autobiography, a historical document, and a carefully crafted polemic, the work provides insight into Reformation politics and society in England.

Askew was found Anne Askew wasn’t a queen. Yet, her name and legacy is firmly ensconced in English history texts

Askew was found Anne Askew wasn’t a queen. She didn’t lead armies; nor was she a duchess during Renaissance/ Reformation England. Yet, her name and legacy is firmly ensconced in English history texts. Anne Askew was a young woman of only 25 years of age when she was penned as a heretic and was tortured on the rack by King Henry VIII’s men (torturing women was illegal). She was even accused of swaying the King’s own men and women in heretical views including his sixth wife, Queen Catherine Parr. The most famous publishing s of Anne Askew’s examinations were released by John Bale and John Foxe (in Acts and Monuments ), respectfully.

Women Writers in English 1350-1850. By (author) Anne Askew. Format Paperback 260 pages.

The Examinations of Anne Askew. Women Writers in English, 1350–1850. New York: Oxford University Press, 1996. University of Missouri-Columbia. Published online by Cambridge University Press: 28 July 2009.

Beilin, Elaine V. Redeeming Eve: Women Writers of the English Renaissance. Women Writers in English 1350-1850. New York: Oxford UP, 1993. Princeton: Princeton UP, 1990. Discusses 44 works by women writers, including Anne Askew, Elizabeth Cary, Mary Wroth, and Aemilia Lanyer. Examines the restricting assumptions imposed upon women writers of the Renaissance. Elizabethan Women and the Poetry of Courtship. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1998. Discusses poetry read by, written by, or addressed to women. Cutting-Gray, Joanne.

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User reviews
Silvermaster
Anne Askew is an acquired taste for some, but I was smitten with her. I read widely on her behalf, but this book brings her right to the surface. Burned at the stake at 25, attractive, witty, her mind was her own (in the early 1500s this is rare). The Roman church hated her for it, and executed her because she didn't believe what they did about communion. This book is her own account of her trial. It is in the original spelling too which gives it charm and a touch of authenticity. Recommend this highly for anyone interest in the Henry VIII culture.
Shakanos
I'm gearing this review more toward the quality of the book and editorial accompaniments than to Askew's text itself. I used this version in a Graduate English course and wrote a seminar paper with this as my primary version of the text. The text is presented well, with clear lines between Askew's text and John Bale's editorial comments. The introduction is useful.

The book is part of the Women Writer's in English series, and because of that, in my opinion it's a little too focused on the women's study angle. John Bale published Askew's account in the context of a particular political situation and in response to specific attacks from the English Bishop Gardner. That being said, there isn't a version that contains all of that information.

Hopefully someday there's a larger version of Askew published with additional editorial content, but for now, this is the best available and it's not bad at all.