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Free eBook Romantic Correspondence: Women, Politics and the Fiction of Letters (Cambridge Studies in Romanticism) download

by Mary A. Favret

Free eBook Romantic Correspondence: Women, Politics and the Fiction of Letters (Cambridge Studies in Romanticism) download ISBN: 0521410967
Author: Mary A. Favret
Publisher: Cambridge University Press (February 26, 1993)
Language: English
Pages: 282
Category: Imaginative Literature
Subcategory: History and Criticism
Size MP3: 1458 mb
Size FLAC: 1276 mb
Rating: 4.8
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This study of correspondence in the Romantic period calls into question the common notion that letters are a particularly 'romantic', personal, and . Series: Cambridge Studies in Romanticism (Book 1).

This study of correspondence in the Romantic period calls into question the common notion that letters are a particularly 'romantic', personal, and ultimately feminine form of writing. Paperback: 284 pages. Publisher: Cambridge University Press (January 27, 2005). ISBN-13: 978-0521604284. Product Dimensions: 6 x . x 9 inches.

Romantic Correspondence: Women, Politics and the Fiction of Letters Favret, Mary A. ritish Romantic Writers and the East: Anxieties of Empire Leask, Nigel. oetry as an Occupation and an Art in Britain, 1760–1830 Murphy, Peter. omance and Revolution: Shelley and the Politics of a Genre Duff, David

Romantic Correspondence book Published January 27th 2005 by Cambridge University Press (first published February 26th 1993).

Romantic Correspondence book. Published January 27th 2005 by Cambridge University Press (first published February 26th 1993).

Romantic Correspondence: Women, Politics and the Fiction of Letters. Pages displayed by permission of Cambridge University Press.

By: Favret, Mary A. Material type: BookSeries: Cambridge studies in Romanticism. Publisher: Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press,c. 993Description: xii, 268 p. : ill. ; 23 c. SBN: 0521410967. Subject(s): English letters - History and criticism English prose literature - Women authors - History and criticism Women authors, English - Correspondence - History and criticism Politics and literature - Great Britain - History - 19th century Politics and literature - Great Britain - History.

Cambridge Scholars Publishing This book first published 2008 Cambridge Scholars Publishing 12 Back . 27 The Romantic Letter, the Reader and, the Canon(s) of Romanticism.

Cambridge Scholars Publishing. Romanticism Gendered: Male Writers as Readers of Women’s Writing in Romantic Correspondence, by Andrea Fischerová. Part 1. The Romantic Letter.

The literary importance of letters did not end with the demise of the . Romantic Correspondence : Women, Politics and the Fiction of Letters.

book by Mary A. Favret. The literary importance of letters did not end with the demise of the eighteenth-century epistolary novel.

Women, Politics and the Fiction of Letters (Cambridge Studies in Romanticism). Published January 27, 2005 by Cambridge University Press.

Romanticism (also known as the Romantic era) was an artistic, literary, musical and intellectual movement that originated in Europe toward the end of the 18th century, and in most areas was at its peak in the approximate period from 1800 to 1850

Romanticism (also known as the Romantic era) was an artistic, literary, musical and intellectual movement that originated in Europe toward the end of the 18th century, and in most areas was at its peak in the approximate period from 1800 to 1850. Romanticism was characterized by its emphasis on emotion and individualism as well as glorification of all the past and nature, preferring the medieval rather than the classical.

The literary importance of letters did not end with the demise of the eighteenth-century epistolary novel. In the turbulent period between 1789 and 1830, the letter was used as a vehicle for political rather than sentimental expression. Against a background of severe political censorship, seditious Corresponding Societies, and the rise of the modern Post Office, letters as they are used by Romantic writers, especially women, become the vehicle for a distinctly political, often disruptive force. Mary Favret's study of Romantic correspondence reexamines traditional accounts of epistolary writing, and redefines the letter as a 'feminine' genre. The book deals not only with letters which circulated in the novels of Austen or Mary Shelley, but also with political pamphlets, incendiary letters and spy letters available for public consumption.