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Free eBook The Analects of Confucius (Lun Yu) download

by Chichung Huang,Confucius

Free eBook The Analects of Confucius (Lun Yu) download ISBN: 0195112768
Author: Chichung Huang,Confucius
Publisher: Oxford University Press; 4th printing edition (May 29, 1997)
Language: English
Pages: 224
Category: Imaginative Literature
Subcategory: History and Criticism
Size MP3: 1195 mb
Size FLAC: 1536 mb
Rating: 4.2
Format: mobi lit rtf azw


The Analects of Confucius. has been added to your Cart. Very insightful translation-Huang covers more bases than other translators of The Analects do, and he truly does an admirable job of providing a literal translation along with alternative explanations and additional notes.

The Analects of Confucius. Highly recommended, especially for those also reading The Analects in the original Chinese.

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Как создавались империи. The Analects of Confucius - Audiobook - Продолжительность: 3:32:24 libribooks Recommended for you.

Confucius, Chichung Huang. In the long river of human history, if one person can represent the civilization of a whole nation, it is perhaps Master Kong, better known as Confucius in the West. If there is one single book that can be upheld as the common code of a whole people, it is perhaps Lun Yu, or The Analects. Surely, few individuals in history have shaped their country's civilization more profoundly than Master Kong. The great Han historiographer, Si-ma Qian, writing 2,100 years ago said, "He may be called the wisest indeed!".

From the time of Confucius, the Analects have strongly influenced the philosophy and ethical values of China and, later, other East Asian countries. A man who was unfamiliar with the Analects was considered uneducated and not morally upright

From the time of Confucius, the Analects have strongly influenced the philosophy and ethical values of China and, later, other East Asian countries. A man who was unfamiliar with the Analects was considered uneducated and not morally upright. Together with other works that make up the Four Books, the Analects teach the main Confucian virtues: Decorum, Justice, Fairness, and Filial Piety. For nearly two thousand years, the Analects were the foundation of Chinese education.

In English and simplified and traditional Chinese. Find by reference ICS Lunyu. Format: Chapter/Page/Line or Page/Line or Chapter More information.

The father of Confucius was said to have been a member of the nobility, but family fell into poverty . Definition The Analects (Lun -yü) is a collection of moral and ethical principles enunciated by the Chinese thinker Confucius in conversations with his disciples

The father of Confucius was said to have been a member of the nobility, but family fell into poverty after his death, when Confucius was just three. In spite of his family’s financial problems, Confucius received a good education in music, arithmetic, calligraphy, and other disciplines. Definition The Analects (Lun -yü) is a collection of moral and ethical principles enunciated by the Chinese thinker Confucius in conversations with his disciples. These principles set standards for individual conduct and the administration of government and community.

The Analects, also known as the Analects of Confucius, are a record of. .The Chinese title literally means discussion over words. Written during the Spring and Autumn Period through the Warring States Period (ca.

The Analects, also known as the Analects of Confucius, are a record of the words and acts of the central Chinese thinker and philosopher Confucius and his disciples, as well as the discussions they held. 479 BC – 221 BC), the Analects is the representative work of Confucianism and continues to have a tremendous influence on Chinese and East Asian thought and values today. 479 BC - 221 BC), the Analects is the representative work of Confucianism and continues to have a tremendous influence on Chinese and East Asian thought and values today. Genre(s): Philosophy.

In the long river of human history, if one person can represent the civilization of a whole nation, it is perhaps Master Kong, better known as Confucius in the West. If there is one single book that can be upheld as the common code of a whole people, it is perhaps Lun Yu, or The Analects. Surely, few individuals in history have shaped their country's civilization more profoundly than Master Kong. The great Han historiographer, Si-ma Qian, writing 2,100 years ago said, "He may be called the wisest indeed!" And, as recently as 1988, at a final session of the first international conference of Nobel prize-winners in Paris, the seventy-five participants, fifty-two of whom where scientists, concluded: "If mankind is to survive, it must go back twenty- five centuries in time to tap the wisdom of Confucius." This a man whose influence in world history is truly incomparable. His sayings (and those of his disciples) form the basis of a distinct social, ethical, and intellectual system. They have retained their freshness and vigor for two and a half millennia, and are still admired in today's China. Compiled by pupils of Confucius's disciples half a century after the Master's death, The Analects of Confucius laid the foundation of his philosophy of humanity--a philosophy aimed at "cultivating the individual's moral conduct, achieving family harmony, bringing good order to the state and peace to the empire. Containing 501 very succinct chapters (the longest do not exceed fifteen lines and the shortest are less than one) and organized into twenty books, the collection comprises mostly dialogues between the Master and his disciples and contemporaries. The ethical tenets Confucius put forth not only became the norm of conduct for the officialdom and intelligentsia, but also profoundly impacted the behavior of the common people. The great sage's unique integration of humanity and righteousness (love and reason) struck a powerful chord in all who attempted to understand his moral philosophy. As translator Chichung Huang contends, "What ethical principle laid down by man could be more sensible that none which blends the best our heart can offer with the best our mind can offer as the guiding light for our conduct throughout our lives?" Ever timely, Confucius's teachings on humanity (family harmony in particular) and righteousness may well serve as a ready-made cure for today's ills in an era which human beings are blinded by force and lust, not unlike Confucius's own day. Far more literal than any English version still in circulation, this brilliant new rendition of The Analects helps the reader not only to acquire and accurate and lucid understanding of the original text, but also to appreciate the imagery, imagery, parallelism, and concision of its classical style. The translator Chichung Huang, a Chinese scholar born in a family of Confucian teachers and schooled in one of the last village Confucian schools in South China, brings to this treasure of world literature a sure voice that captures the power and subtleties of the original. Vivid, simple, and eminently readable, this illuminating work makes the golden teachings of the sage of the East readily available to anyone in search of them.
User reviews
Trash Obsession
A lot of reviewers have complained about the formatting of this e-book. It may be a little odd, but not impossible to deal with:

CHAP. III. The Master said, 'Fine words and an insinuating appearance are seldom associated with true virtue.' CHAP. IV. The philosopher Tsang said, 'I daily examine myself on three points:— whether, in transacting business for others, I may have been not faithful;— whether, in intercourse with friends, I may have been not sincere;— whether I may have not mastered and practised the instructions of my teacher.'

The whole work, which is less than 200 pp. long, is divided in to 20 books, with, as you can see, very short chapters.

Is the wisdom of Confucius all platitude? No, there are some really obscure remarks as well:

CHAP. XIII. 1. Wang-sun Chia asked, saying, 'What is the meaning of the saying, "It is better to pay court to the furnace than to the south-west corner?"' 2. The Master said, 'Not so. He who offends against Heaven has none to whom he can pray.'

CHAP. XI. Tsze-kung said, 'What I do not wish men to do to me, I also wish not to do to men.' The Master said, 'Ts'ze, you have not attained to that.'

Perhaps the wisdom is flattened out in translation. Perhaps there are ironies only scholars can recognize. Unlike one reader, who couldn't put it down, I found its fragmentary quality made it easy to pick up and put down whenever I felt like it. Was I wiser, having finished it? Perhaps, or perhaps not.

CHAP. XVIII. 1. The Duke of Sheh asked Tsze-lu about Confucius, and Tsze-lu did not answer him. 2. The Master said, 'Why did you not say to him,— He is simply a man, who in his eager pursuit (of knowledge) forgets his food, who in the joy of its attainment forgets his sorrows, and who does not perceive that old age is coming on?' CHAP. XIX. The Master said, 'I am not one who was born in the possession of knowledge; I am one who is fond of antiquity, and earnest in seeking it there.' CHAP. XX. The subjects on which the Master did not talk, were— extraordinary things, feats of strength, disorder, and spiritual beings.
Purestone
Translations of Confucius tends to be problematic for some and this e-book may present a problem to novices (like myself) since there is no introduction. But even in comparison to a copy that I own it seems to be a good translation. If you were to be picky, the only other complaint would be that it tends to be a little wordy. For example:

My text:
"To know what you know and know what you do not know - this then is wisdom"

E-book version:
"When you know a thing, to hold that you know it; and when you do not know a thing to, to allow that you do not know it;- this is knowledge".

For the most part it's a good translation...and it's free!
Goldenfang
This translation is far superior to any other that I have seen. The Analects have always been a difficult and opaque work for me. I have read it several times over many years and have always found at least half the sayings completely incomprehensible. The Waley and Legge translations are dry and dated. Lau and Dawson are easier to read but still leave me puzzled about the meaning of most of the sayings. Some of their notes are useless and distracting, while others merely fail to inform. I was always left thinking of the Analects as a few clever and witty proverbs scattered throughout a strange and impentrable work.

The Huang translation, on the other hand, is clear and easy to read. It is easy to follow the structure of the book. It has just the right amount of notes and they are located just underneath the analect itself--not at the bottom of the page or end of the book where you have to interupt your reading and look for them. The sayings that are easy to understand have no notes. The other sayings have notes that clarify the context and meaning. They are brief and to the point so that they don't get in the way of the text. Things that were impossible to understand are now clear. I find that I am no longer burdened by trying to decipher the meaning. As a result I am now getting to know the character and personality of each of the students, and enjoying their interaction with the Master. This is something I was never able to do before with other translations. Reading the Analects is no longer a chore but an enjoyable journey to a distant, but accessible, culture.
Enalonasa
im very impressed with this book, im always reading it, it helps everyday struggles in life and gives meaning.
Felhalar
Got a couple good quotes out of this one. Going to read la rochefoucauld next. Then Pascal, the maxims of Goethe, and poor richard. I open up kindle and go through them once per day, every time I poop. Beats Facebook.
Jode
"Confcius Say...", but did he, really? Or was he misinterpreted? Are you confused about what he said and what he meant? This thin text raises the veil and exposes the truth of what Confucius really said. Your interpretation is aided by the commentaries inserted at key points. Don't be surprised if you find yourself doing double takes at his double entendres.
Haracetys
This book is a collection of translated quotations of classical Chinese statements deemed important by the author. As such it is an excellent reference. However, for those truly interested, original sources are recommended in order to place quotations in their proper context. I found the first 3-5 pages interesting, but gave up shortly thereafter.
Very insightful translation--Huang covers more bases than other translators of The Analects do, and he truly does an admirable job of providing a literal translation along with alternative explanations and additional notes. Highly recommended, especially for those also reading The Analects in the original Chinese.