» » Tracing Paradise: Two Years in Harmony with John Milton

Free eBook Tracing Paradise: Two Years in Harmony with John Milton download

by Dawn Potter

Free eBook Tracing Paradise: Two Years in Harmony with John Milton download ISBN: 1558497013
Author: Dawn Potter
Publisher: University of Massachusetts Press; 1 edition (May 11, 2009)
Language: English
Pages: 144
Category: Imaginative Literature
Subcategory: History and Criticism
Size MP3: 1938 mb
Size FLAC: 1572 mb
Rating: 4.1
Format: lrf rtf mbr doc


Dawn Potter is the author of two poetry collections, most recently How the Crimes Happened. She is associate director of the Frost Place Conference on Poetry and Teaching and lives in Harmony, Maine, with her husband and two sons.

Dawn Potter is the author of two poetry collections, most recently How the Crimes Happened.

Tracing Paradise book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Tracing Paradise: Two Years in Harmony with John Milton as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

One winter morning, poet Dawn Potter sat down at her desk in Harmony, Maine, and began copying out the .

One winter morning, poet Dawn Potter sat down at her desk in Harmony, Maine, and began copying out the opening lines of John Milton’s Paradise Lost. Over the course of twelve chapters, Potter explores her very personal response to Milton and Paradise Lost, tracing the surprising intersections between a seventeenthcentury biblical epic and the routine joys and tragedies of domestic life in contemporary rural Maine. Curious, opinionated, and eager, she engages with the canon on mutable, individual terms.

Tracing Paradise reminds us that close engagement with another artist's task may itself be a form of creation. One winter morning, poet Dawn Potter sat down at her desk in Harmony, Maine, and began copying out the opening lines of John Milton's Paradise Lost. Above all, Potter's memoir celebrates one reader's difficult yet transformative love affair with Milton's glorious, irritating, inscrutable masterpiece. Her intent was to spend half an hour with a poem she had never liked, her goal to transcribe a page or two. Maybe she would begin to appreciate the poet's art, though she had no real expectations that the exercise would change her mind about the poem.

We use these abbreviations for works by John Milton: 1667 Paradise Lost. A Poem in Twelve Books published around July 1. Milton dies November 9 or 10 and is buried in St. Giles, Cripplegate

We use these abbreviations for works by John Milton: 1667 Paradise Lost. A Poem Written in Ten Books (1667). 1671 Paradise Regained. 1645 Two more divorce pamphlets, Tetrachordon and Colasterion, published in March. Reconciles with Mary in July or August and moves to a larger house in Barbican in September. 1646 Poems of Mr. John Milton published in January, dated 1645. Giles, Cripplegate. Minutes of the life of mr. john milton.

And God made two great Lights, great for thir use To Man, the greater to. .

And God made two great Lights, great for thir use To Man, the greater to have rule by Day The less by Night alterne: and made the Starrs, And set them in the Firmament of Heav'n To illuminate the Earth, and rule the Day In thir vicissitude, and rule the Night, And Light from Darkness to divide.

Mass Market Paperback Paperback Hardcover Mass Market Paperback Paperback Hardcover.

Dawn Potter, Anne Kehoe, Jason E Smith Tracing Paradise: Two Years in Harmony with John Milton.

Dawn Potter, Anne Kehoe, Jason E Smith. can scholar : I had better never see a book, than to be warped by its attraction clean out of my own orbit, and made a satellite instead of a system. Quotas and lists make desperate readers, bus. More). Tracing Paradise: Two Years in Harmony with John Milton.

Paradise Lost is a blank verse, epic poem by John Milton, first published in 1667. A second version, consisting of twelve books, followed in 1674. The poem is the basis on which Milton is usually considered one of the greatest English poets

Paradise Lost is a blank verse, epic poem by John Milton, first published in 1667. The poem is the basis on which Milton is usually considered one of the greatest English poets Paradise Lost is a blank verse, epic poem by John Milton, first published in 1667. The poem is the basis on which Milton is usually considered one of the greatest English poets

One winter morning, poet Dawn Potter sat down at her desk in Harmony, Maine, and began copying out the opening lines of John Milton's Paradise Lost. Her intent was to spend half an hour with a poem she had never liked, her goal to transcribe a page or two. Maybe she would begin to appreciate the poet's art, though she had no real expectations that the exercise would change her mind about the poem. Yet what began as a whim turned rapidly into an obsession, and soon Potter was immersed in a strange and unexpected project: she found herself copying out every single word of Milton's immense, convoluted epic.Tracing Paradise: Two Years in Harmony with John Milton is her memoir of that long task. Over the course of twelve chapters, Potter explores her very personal response to Milton and Paradise Lost, tracing the surprising intersections between a seventeenth-century biblical epic and the routine joys and tragedies of domestic life in contemporary rural Maine. Curious, opinionated, and eager, she engages with the canon on mutable, individual terms. Though she writes perceptively about the details and techniques of Milton's art, always her reactions are linked to her present-tense experiences as a poet, small-time farmer, family member, and citizen of a poor and beleaguered north-country town.A skilled and entertaining writer, Potter is also a wide-ranging and sophisticated reader. Yet her memoir is not a scholarly treatise: her enthusiasms and misgivings about both Milton and Paradise Lost ebb and flow with the days. Tracing Paradise reminds us that close engagement with another artist's task may itself be a form of creation. Above all, Potter's memoir celebrates one reader's difficult yet transformative love affair with Milton's glorious, irritating, inscrutable masterpiece.
User reviews
Kezan
I am amazed that no one has reviewed this wonderful book before now. I admit that I had missed its existence until a friend, who knew I was teaching a course on Paradise Lost in a Lifelong Learning Institute, asked me if I had read it. His description guaranteed that I would track it down instantly, and I am grateful that I did. It may not sound promising--a woman who lives in an unglamorous part of Maine sets out to add to the many chores she has to maintain her farm and care for her husband and two children: the added chore?--copying out, word for word, the whole of Milton's epic, Paradise Lost. If this sounds like a weird or extremely eccentric undertaking, I must say that it is not. I know from experience that copying passages of literature, whether poetry or prose, is a perfect way to gain a deep feeling for the way the author manipulates the language, so I was attracted to the book in part because I already thought her project would be fascinating. In addition, as one who has taught Paradise Lost as often as possible over a teaching career of nearly 40 years, I am eager to read almost any appreciation of that great work. All of that I found in Dawn Potter's book.

But there is so much more. This is a memoir of life in a small town, remote from the academic or social contexts of either great cities or university towns; Potter makes no effort to glamorize or sentimentalize the town of Harmony. (I have not been to Harmony, but I visited friends in Dexter many years ago, so I have a pretty good idea of the area she describes.) At the same time, she convincingly portrays the kinds of "riches" that are available only through an appreciation of the simple daily details of making do or getting by or even enjoying life in an environment where making a fire in the morning, finding ways to deal with mud season or black flies, sorting out the characters and quirks of small town neighbors are significant parts of daily life, and daily life is what matters. It is exciting to watch her finding in Milton--seemingly as remote a man as one could imagine from the life she is living--a way of thinking about life that has strong affinities to hers. She portrays her own life with its frustrations and warts, as well as its beauties, and she portrays her experiences of Paradise Lost, encounters with its quirks, its occasional ugliness (those paeans to female submissiveness!), and its undeniable glories, and these come together to form a memoir truly compelling, as well as a testimonial to the power of a great literary work, even one that fails almost as many times as it triumphs, to provide illumination, consolation, pure aesthetic beauty. I hope many will read Potter's book and be moved to try reading Paradise Lost, as well. They cannot fail, though wand'ring, to rejoice.
Nuadora
For anyone who loves beautiful language; a love of sensitivity and a challenge to their cultural sensibilities, this is a treasure that shines 'of itself.'