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Free eBook Rainer Maria Rilke's The Book of Hours: A New Translation with Commentary (Studies in German Literature Linguistics and Culture) download

by Ben Hutchinson,Susan Ranson,Rainer Maria Rilke

Free eBook Rainer Maria Rilke's The Book of Hours: A New Translation with Commentary (Studies in German Literature Linguistics and Culture) download ISBN: 1571133801
Author: Ben Hutchinson,Susan Ranson,Rainer Maria Rilke
Publisher: Camden House (May 2, 2008)
Language: English
Pages: 284
Category: Imaginative Literature
Subcategory: History and Criticism
Size MP3: 1610 mb
Size FLAC: 1563 mb
Rating: 4.5
Format: lit mbr azw rtf


ISBN-13: 978-1571135438. BROWN BOOK The whole collection is newly translated here in fine, faithful versions by Susan Ranson, who captures the sonorities of the verse with apparent ease and handles the difficulties of Rilke's over-fondness for rhyme very judiciously. TIMES LITERARY SUPPLEMENT Ranson. recognizes the ambiguity which pervades the original, and has tried to find a balance between faithfully reproducing ambituigies and "recognizing some duty of clarity to the reader. Translation and literature.

Ben Hutchinson is Reader in Modern German at the University of Kent, UK.

His New Poems, Duino Elegies, and Sonnets to Orpheus are pillars of 20th-century poetry. Yet his earlier verse is less known. His New Poems, Duino Elegies, and Sonnets to Orpheus are pillars of 20th-century poetry. Ben Hutchinson is Reader in Modern German at the University of Kent, U. .

His 'New Poems, Duino Elegies,' and 'Sonnets to Orpheus' are pillars of 20th-century poetry. The Book of Hours, written in three bursts between. The poems document Rilke's tour of Russia with Lou Andreas-Salomé, his hasty marriage and fathering of a child in Worpswede, and his turn toward the urban modernity of Paris.

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Studies in German Literature, Linguistics, and Culture. Since Rilke wrote in German, it's a wonder how English translations of his works still affect me so deeply and effortlessly

Studies in German Literature, Linguistics, and Culture. Boydell & Brewer. Since Rilke wrote in German, it's a wonder how English translations of his works still affect me so deeply and effortlessly. These poems Rilke viewed as private and as intimate as his prayers to God, and they also represent his true poetic legacy. That was why they were not originally released to the public. Rilke was only 23 years old when he started writing the poems in this collection. He had already published three volumes of other poems prior.

Translated by Susan Ranson. Pp. xliii + 240. Rochester, NY: Camden House, 2008. Cite this publication.

Studies in German Literature, Linguistics and Culture, 19. Camden House Inc, . New York/Rochester, 240 pp. ISBN 978-1-57113-38. Contact us about this Publication).

Rainer Maria Rilke is arguably the most important modern German-language poet. His New Poems, Duino Elegies, and Sonnets to Orpheus are pillars of 20th-century poetry. Yet his earlier verse is less known. The Book of Hours, written in three bursts between 1899 and 1903, is Rilke's most formative work, covering a crucial period in his rapid ascent from fin-de-siècle epigone to distinctive modern voice. The poems document Rilke's tour of Russia with Lou Andreas-Salomé, his hasty marriage and fathering of a child in Worpswede, and his turn toward the urban modernity of Paris. He assumes the persona of an artist-monk undertaking the Romantics' journey into the self, speaking to God as part transcendent deity, part needy neighbor. The poems can be read simply for their luminous lyricism, captured in Susan Ranson's superb new translation, which reproduces the music of the original German with impressive fluidity. An in-depth introduction explains the context of the work and elucidates its major themes, while the poem-by-poem commentary is helpful to the student and the general reader. A translator's note treating the technical problems of rhythm, meter, and rhyme that the translator of Rilke faces completes the volume. Susan Ranson is the co-translator, with Marielle Sutherland, of Rainer Maria Rilke, Selected Poems (Oxford World's Classics, 2011). Ben Hutchinson is Reader in Modern German at the University of Kent, UK.
User reviews
Naa
Beautiful poems, with no tortured rhyme. I felt like I was getting the true feelings of the poems, and the rhythm of the original, as far as that's possible. The commentary and notes, at the back were short, and to the point. The introduction, and translator's notes at the front were very helpful. Great poems.
Kupidon
Rilke's poetry is written in German and translating it to another language is a near impossible task in terms of transferring feeling and atmosphere, which are so much a part of poetry, to begin with. At the same time the German used in his poetry is not easy to understand, hence the need for a translation. FYI: my personal appreciation for the language stems in large part from getting to know Rilke's work (aside from being taught from 7th grade for a basic understanding) and personal friendships / relationships (speech, with emotion). Enter this book. It's understood that with poetry translation one needs to take some liberty, but I find the author introducing words that neither exist in the German text, nor are explained by essential context / meaning, causing me to wonder; what am I reading ? It makes me want to take a pen and try it myself, as a way to get deeper into the meaning, but that's not why one buys a translation, after all. So, as a guide, it's okay, and as a translation of the poetry it's hit and miss. But then, as stated in the beginning, what can one expect ?
Marirne
Unfamiliar with the work of Rilke, I was amazed by this book. After reading it through several times, I now dip into it at random and find some new wonder every time. I found the Introduction and the Commentary and Notes very helpful, the former putting the work in context and showing the poet's development over the course of the book, and the latter adding to my understanding and appreciation of each individual poem.
I believe anyone who enjoys poetry will be delighted by Rilke's music, rich imagery, rhythmic innovation and subtlety of rhyme. You may also be surprised by the "modernity" of the Third Book, written in 1903. The poems are so fluid and feel so spontaneous that one forgets these are in fact translations.