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Free eBook Zuleika Dobson (Modern Library 100 Best Novels) download

by Max Beerbohm

Free eBook Zuleika Dobson (Modern Library 100 Best Novels) download ISBN: 037575248X
Author: Max Beerbohm
Publisher: Modern Library; Reprint edition (September 14, 1998)
Language: English
Pages: 252
Category: Imaginative Literature
Subcategory: History and Criticism
Size MP3: 1225 mb
Size FLAC: 1542 mb
Rating: 4.9
Format: mbr mobi doc txt


ZULEIKA DOBSON by Max Beerbohm Three stories are told in Styron’s National Book Award–winning novel: a young Southerner journeys to New York, eager to become a writer; a turbulent love-hate affair between.

ZULEIKA DOBSON by Max Beerbohm. Written in 1911, just before World War I, the various absurdities of plot and all of the characters are best seen as a satire of Downton Abbey–era society, class, and wealth. A beautiful young woman goes to Oxford and meets the handsome, rich, and snobbish Duke of Dorset. Three stories are told in Styron’s National Book Award–winning novel: a young Southerner journeys to New York, eager to become a writer; a turbulent love-hate affair between Nathan, a brilliant Jew, and Sophie, a beautiful Polish woman who survived internment at Auschwitz; and of an awful wound in Sophie’s past that impels both her and Nathan toward destruction.

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This page contains details about the Fiction book Zuleika Dobson by Max Beerbohm published in. .Zuleika Dobson (Modern Library 100 Best Novels).

This page contains details about the Fiction book Zuleika Dobson by Max Beerbohm published in 1911. This book is the 785th greatest Fiction book of all time as determined by thegreatestbooks. Zuleika Dobson is a highly accomplished and superbly written book whose spirit is farcical," said E. M. Forster. It is a great work-the most consistent achievement of fantasy in our time. so funny and charming, so iridescent yet so profound.

Zuleika Dobson by. Max Beerbohm.

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The purpose of the list was to "to bring the Modern Library to public attention" and stimulate sales of its books.

Selected by the Modern Library as one of the 100 best novels of all time "Zuleika Dobson is a highly accomplished .

Selected by the Modern Library as one of the 100 best novels of all time "Zuleika Dobson is a highly accomplished and superbly written book whose spirit. Originally published in 1911, Max Beerbohm’s sparklingly wicked satire concerns the unlikely events that occur when a femme fatale briefly enters the supremely privileged, all-male domain of Judas College, Oxford. A conjurer by profession, Zuleika Dobson can only love a man who is impervious to her considerable charms: a circumstance that proves fatal, as any number of love-smitten suitors are driven to suicide by the damsel’s rejection.

Max Beerbohm earned his fame as a caricaturist and essayist, and Zuleika Dobson is his only novel. Beerbohm’s essays were famous for their sharp wit and humor, and Zuleika follows in that tradition-Beerbohm himself called the novel the work of a leisurely essayist amusing himself with a narrative idea

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Modern Library has terrible taste in novels. And probably even better books too. 6. level ∞. Aug 19, 2016. I think it's the fate of every top 100 list to be hated. In this case, I think it's somewhat deserved, but I doubt any list would escape criticism.

Selected by the Modern Library as one of the 100 best novels of all time"Zuleika Dobson is a highly accomplished and superbly written book whose spirit is farcical," said E. M. Forster. "It is a great work--the most consistent achievement of fantasy in our time . . . so funny and charming, so iridescent yet so profound."   Originally published in 1911, Max Beerbohm's sparklingly wicked satire concerns the unlikely events that occur when a femme fatale briefly enters the supremely privileged, all-male domain of Judas Col-lege, Oxford. A conjurer by profession, Zuleika Dobson can only love a man who is impervious to her considerable charms: a circumstance that proves fatal, as any number of love-smitten suitors are driven to suicide by the damsel's rejection. Laced with memorable one-liners ("Death cancels all engagements," utters the first casualty) and inspired throughout by Beerbohm's rococo imagination, this lyrical evocation of Edwardian undergraduate life at Oxford has, according to Forster, "a beauty unattainable by serious literature."   "I read Zuleika Dobson with pleasure," recalled Bertrand Russell. "It represents the Oxford that the two World Wars have destroyed with a charm that is not likely to be reproduced anywhere in the world for the next thousand years."
User reviews
Hellmaster
I enjoyed this older book, especially because I read it as we were touring Oxford and England. The story is set within Oxford University during the early years of the 20th century. Our narrator, never named, has been given the gift of seeing into the thoughts and emotions of all of the characters in the tale, which is presented as a 'truthful recounting' of that 'infamous event', wherein Miss Zuleika (pronounced "Zu-leek-ah" by the author) Dobson came to visit Oxford. There is much here that pokes fun at academes, ivory towers, and College life, but also there is a gentle prodding for us to examine how we view ourselves and how we interact with those around us, as well as a nod to the excesses of youth, and the youthful idea that no-one has ever felt this way before, and that no-one can possibly understand what it is like to be me. Be patient with this book; the set-up and explanations come slowly. But for a gentle, entertaining look at youth, vocation, self-confidence/ego, and the vagaries of academia, all set in an Oxonian context (and using an appropriately excellent, though complex, writing style and vocabulary to match), read the fictional 're-telling' of the story of Zuleika Dobson.
Malalrajas
This is a classic. But, for many of today's readers who were born after the demise of the phonograph, they may find the eccentricity and cliches of this book both awkward and disingenuous.

We have always heard the expression "I would die to be with that `woman.'" This book parlays that statement into a novel as one, then some, then almost all, of the male students of the elite institution of Oxford take this cliched saying to a literal demise.

Satire abounds. At one time the Duke decides to renege on his promise to die for the title character (because she will not marry him), and she audaciously responds that he is a coward and not a man of his word. He is then stuck with the greatest of all decisions: live and be found not to be a man of his word about suicide, or die and be a man of his word.

The dialogue is tightly written. Curt and very different from our 21st century patois, the reading is both fun and sometimes difficult. It is more Shakespearean than not. You can see that this author read, and probably reread, that 16th century author as did most men of his educational and geographical background.

Humor is even directed to the author. At one time the Duke notices that Zuleika may not be well read, but she is well spoken. This amazes him - it adds to her attraction. She explains that she became well spoken as she once sat next to a bright young man named Beerbohm - who apparently in one night made her able to delight even the Oxford-educated man with her repertoire.

If you think discussion about suicide for a woman (whom you have only met within a day) is a boring or ridiculous subject, you may want to stay away from this weird story. If you wish to have some inner visions of the pre-WW I British elite males of Oxford, this book offers you plenty. If you just like reading good prose, this book is much more than adequate.
tamada
This book is a classic, and for good reason. The humor is as fresh today as it was when the book first came out, and the illustrations in this addition are icing on the cake. However, those in search of an aggressive, modern-style book might be disappointed, and may miss grasping the often subtle humor. I am not particularly modern, and so I loved the thing. Reading the part where the Duke discourses about his genealogy and wealth is worth the price of the book by itself. The travel plans mentioned on the last page made me laugh out loud.
Paxondano
I enjoyed the elaborate cleverness and social satire of the novel, but found the execution of its core theme to be somewhat tedious. Anyone who prefers realistic characters and situations will be disappointed. The text creates its sensations largely through extended caricature and fantasy--to usually good effect. The writing style is relatively ornate and allusive. My favorite sections were the passages that captured the author's affection for (a now) vanished Oxford.
Saimath
I prefer his essays but Beerbohm's prose always pleases. The advantage of this edition: copyediting. Other editions have the unintentional humor afforded by unedited OCR.
Siramath
Highly unlikely but readable. A bit turgid I think. Pretty good character development though. Always want to finish something I start.
Whitegrove
A brilliant novel about English mores, academia, the herd mentality of the upper class, and the world of as seen through Max Beerbohm, comically incisive.
What do I even say? It's a very humorous book, well written, and very odd. Definitely give it a try if you're in the mood for some literary, over the top, Edwardian satire.