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Free eBook The Search for Self-Sovereignty: The Oratory of Elizabeth Cady Stanton (Great American Orators) download

by Beth M. Waggenspack

Free eBook The Search for Self-Sovereignty: The Oratory of Elizabeth Cady Stanton (Great American Orators) download ISBN: 031325978X
Author: Beth M. Waggenspack
Publisher: Greenwood; Annotated edition edition (December 6, 1989)
Language: English
Pages: 216
Category: Imaginative Literature
Subcategory: History and Criticism
Size MP3: 1552 mb
Size FLAC: 1292 mb
Rating: 4.9
Format: doc mobi azw lrf


by. Beth M. Waggenspack. Elizabeth Cady Stanton was one of the founding philosophers of America's women's rights movement.

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Elizabeth Cady Stanton: Social Reformer (Compass Point Books, 2005) . The Selected Papers of Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony: In the School of Anti-Slavery, 1840-1866 (Rutgers: Rutgers University Press, 1997). The Road to Senecca Falls: Elizabeth Cady Stanton and the First Woman's Rights Convention(Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2004).

The Selected Papers of Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony . Nine Women: Portraits from the American Radical Tradition

The Selected Papers of Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony, Volume I: In the School of Anti-Slavery. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 1997. The Solitude of Self: Thinking about Elizabeth Cady Stanton. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2005. Created Equal: A Biography of Elizabeth Cady Stanton. New York, John Day, 1940. Nine Women: Portraits from the American Radical Tradition. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2002. New York: Greenwood Press, 1989. Wheeler, Marjorie Spruill, ed.

Don't be afraid, Elizabeth Cady Stanton seems to be saying in Solitude of Self

Don't be afraid, Elizabeth Cady Stanton seems to be saying in Solitude of Self. To be solitary, she tells her audience, is to explore part of what it means to be human. And in that exploration, she adds, we can often find the miracle of our uniqueness. The Advocate (Baton Rouge). With the power of her mind, her rhetoric, her voice, she would be ballistic if she were here today. Stanton was the greatest influence on female culture in the history of women's suffrage, while not as well known as Anthony. She was the mind behind the movement.

ELIZABETH CADY STANTON: FURTHER ams . Elizabeth Cady Stanton.

ELIZABETH CADY STANTON: FURTHER ams, Elmer . and Warren Durham Foster. In Heroines of Progress, pp. 58-88. New York: Sturgis and Walton, 1913. Comprises a short biography. In Seven Women: Portraits from the American Radical Tradition, pp. 63-93. New York: Viking Press, 1977. Discusses Stanton's work as a reformer beginning with the 1848 Seneca Falls convention. New York: Greenwood Press, 1989, 204 p. Critical survey of Stanton's speeches. Wolff, Cynthia Griffin.

Elizabeth Cady Stanton (November 12, 1815 – October 26, 1902) was an American suffragist, social activist, abolitionist, and leading figure of the early women's rights movement. Stanton was president of the National American Woman Suffrage Association from 1890 until 1892.

Elizabeth Cady Stanton’s Early Life. On Election Day in 1920, millions of American women exercised their right to vote for the first time. Elizabeth was born in Johnstown, New York, on November 12, 1815, to Daniel Cady and Margaret Livingston. Stanton helped write the Declaration of Sentiments, a document modeled after the Declaration of Independence that laid out what the rights of American women should be and compared the women’s rights struggle to the Founding Fathers’ fight for independence from the British On Election Day in 1920, millions of American women exercised their right to vote for the first time.

Discover Elizabeth Cady Stanton famous and rare quotes. Anthony: National protection for national citizens, 1873 to 1880, . 91, Rutgers University Press.

Speaking for the Chief: Okyeame and the Politics of Akan Royal Oratory.

Kroskrity, Paul . Bambi B. Schieffelin, and Kathryn Woolard, eds. 1998. New York: Greenwood Press. Woolard, Kathryn, and Bambi B. Schieffelin. Speaking for the Chief: Okyeame and the Politics of Akan Royal Oratory. Bloomington: Indiana University Press. Young, Richard . and S. Jebanesan.

Elizabeth Cady Stanton was one of the founding philosophers of America's women's rights movement. The first woman's rights convention in the United States was held in Seneca Falls, New York, in 1848; there she helped write and present the Declaration of Sentiments, a woman's bill of rights which articulated the inferior and unjust position of women in law, church, and society and called for redress. From this grew the organized demands by women in the United States for the ballot and other social change. In this fourth volume in Greenwood's series of book-length studies of great American orators, Waggenspack focuses on the rhetoric of an outstanding orator who has been hailed as one of the earliest and most outspoken advocates of women's rights issues. This needed addition to the history and criticism of American public address is based on Waggenspack's original research of the Elizabeth Cady Stanton papers and will facilitate not only the study of feminist rhetoric but will also meet the needs of those wishing to evaluate the effects of American public address and the impact of an advocate or speech upon history.

Part One, using a case study format, presents critical analyses of the orator and her speeches with the focus on rhetorical considerations of speaker and speech, purpose and effect. Part Two contains seven definitive speech texts of the commanding oratory analyzed in Part One. Of special note is the inclusion of Cady Stanton's famous The Solitude of Self, a speech appealing to the highest qualities and aspirations to people everywhere. A chronology details all of Cady Stanton's known addresses and the bibliography contains carefully annotated biographies on the orator as well as a detailed list of the contents of the Elizabeth Cady Stanton Papers in the Library of Congress. The volume closes with notes and an index. This notable study will be a valuable research tool for students and scholars of rhetoric, public oratory, American history, and women's studies; it will also fascinate the general reader.