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Free eBook The Story of a New Name: Neapolitan Novels, Book Two download

by Ann Goldstein,Elena Ferrante

Free eBook The Story of a New Name: Neapolitan Novels, Book Two download ISBN: 1609451341
Author: Ann Goldstein,Elena Ferrante
Publisher: Europa Editions; Later prt. edition (September 3, 2013)
Language: English
Pages: 471
Category: Imaginative Literature
Subcategory: Genre Fiction
Size MP3: 1234 mb
Size FLAC: 1583 mb
Rating: 4.5
Format: mobi txt doc mbr


Praise for Elena Ferrante and The Neapolitan Novels. Book two in her Naples trilogy. Two words: Read it. -Ann Hood, writer (from Twitter) Ferrante continues to imbue this growing saga with great magic.

Praise for Elena Ferrante and The Neapolitan Novels. Ferrante’s novels are intensely, violently personal, and because of this they seem to dangle bristling key chains of confession before the unsuspecting reader. James Wood, The New Yorker One of the more nuanced portraits of feminine friendship in recent memory.

Book two of the neapolitan novels. Translated from the Italian. 214 West 29th S. Suite 1003. This book is a work of fiction. Any references to historical events, real people, or real locales are used fictitiously. Translation by Ann Goldstein. Original Title: Storia del nuovo cognome.

They include the following novels: My Brilliant Friend (2012), The Story of a New Name (2013), Those Who Leave and Those Who Stay (2014), and The Story of the Lost Child (2015). The series has been characterized as a bildungsroman, or coming-of-age story.

Praise for elena ferrante’s neapolitan novels Ferrante’s books are enthralling self-contained monoliths that do not seek frie.

Praise for elena ferrante’s neapolitan novels. From the united states. Ferrante’s writing is so unencumbered, so natural, and yet so lovely, brazen, and flush. Independent on Sunday. My Brilliant Friend, translated by Ann Goldstein, is stunning: an intense, forensic exploration of the friendship between Lila and the story’s narrator, Elena. Ferrante’s books are enthralling self-contained monoliths that do not seek frie. ndship but demand silent, fervid admiration from her passionate readers.

The Neapolitan Novels book. Lila is completely Elena Ferrante’s Neapolitan novels-all four of them-are stunning. Childhood friends – one naïve, the other bright yet manipulative – four long-arse books about their very, very toxic relationship, loads of marriage drama, back and forth pettiness, while silly, insecure girl seeks the mean one’s approval ad nauseam.

In these Neapolitan Novels, Elena Ferrante, the acclaimed author of The Days of Abandonment, gives readers a poignant and universal story about friendship and belonging. Ferrante is one of the world’s great storytellers

In these Neapolitan Novels, Elena Ferrante, the acclaimed author of The Days of Abandonment, gives readers a poignant and universal story about friendship and belonging. Ferrante is one of the world’s great storytellers. With the Neapolitan quartet she has given her readers an abundant, generous, and masterfully plotted page-turner that is also a stylish work of literary fiction destined to delight readers for many generations to come. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere.

Her Neapolitan novels include My Brilliant Friend, The Story of a New Name, Those Who Leave and Those Who Stay, and the fourth and final book in the series, The Story of the .

Her Neapolitan novels include My Brilliant Friend, The Story of a New Name, Those Who Leave and Those Who Stay, and the fourth and final book in the series, The Story of the Lost Child. She lives in New York. Библиографические данные. The Story of the Lost Child: Neapolitan Novels, Book Four Neapolitan Novels.

Book Descriptions: The second book, following last year s My Brilliant Friend, featuring the two . Meanwhile, Elena continues her journey of self-discovery.

Book Descriptions: The second book, following last year s My Brilliant Friend, featuring the two friends Lila and Elena. The two protagonists are now in their twenties. Marriage appears to have imprisoned Lila. Each vacillates between hurtful disregard and profound love for the other

Book Two in Elena Ferrante's Neapolitan QuartetIn Elena Ferrante's My Brilliant Friend introduced readers to the unforgettable Elena and Lila, whose lifelong friendship provides the backbone for the Neapolitan Novels. The Story of a New Name.

Book Two in Elena Ferrante's Neapolitan QuartetIn Elena Ferrante's My Brilliant Friend introduced readers to the unforgettable Elena and Lila, whose lifelong friendship provides the backbone for the Neapolitan Novels. I’m glad I kept going with Elena Ferrante’s Neapolitan trilogy. I wasn’t bowled over by My Brilliant Friend: I described myself as interested but not emotionally gripped. Enjoyed seeing Lenu grow, study, and.

Soon to be an HBO series, the follow-up to My Brilliant Friend in the New York Times bestselling Neapolitan quartet about two friends growing up in post-war Italy is a rich, intense, and generous-hearted family epic by Italy’s most beloved and acclaimed writer, Elena Ferrante, “one of the great novelists of our time.” (Roxana Robinson, The New York Times)In The Story of a New Name, Lila has recently married and made her enterée into the family business; Elena, meanwhile, continues her studies and her exploration of the world beyond the neighborhood that she so often finds stifling. Love, jealousy, family, freedom, commitment, and above all friendship: these are signs under which both women live out this phase in their stories. Marriage appears to have imprisoned Lila, and the pressure to excel is at times too much for Elena. Yet the two young women share a complex and evolving bond that is central to their emotional lives and is a source of strength in the face of life's challenges. In these Neapolitan Novels, Elena Ferrante, the acclaimed author of The Days of Abandonment, gives readers a poignant and universal story about friendship and belonging.Ferrante is one of the world’s great storytellers. With the Neapolitan quartet she has given her readers an abundant, generous, and masterfully plotted page-turner that is also a stylish work of literary fiction destined to delight readers for many generations to come.
User reviews
Pipet
Although I have taken many writing classes over the last few years -- both as an undergrad and on-line with published writers -- I cannot fully express with words the appreciation and awe I have, not only for "The Story of a New Name" but for all four of the Neapolitan novels. The only other contemporary book I have ever read that even approaches Ferrante's epic novels is "A Suitable Boy" by Vikram Seth.
The stories are at once of a people, a place, and a time, yet they reveal the complexities of the characters as they change through the trajectory of their lives in Naples -- which is in the midst of a cultural change itself. This, is of course, how our lives will appear if, say, in advanced age we sit down with pen and paper or computer, to tell our grandchildren just how we were in our lifetime.

I have lived through the 40's, 50's, 60's and am still moving on. Imagine how surprised my grandchildren (or their children) will be when they who have only known me as kind, loving "Nana" read my journals! Wish I could be there and wish I could write as well as Ms Ferrante.
Prinna
The story is getting hard to take at this point. I read the first book in hard cover, then went on a trip so switched to ebook. Better in hard cover, I can't say why. The milieu, the terrible things people do to each other, the hardness of one of the main characters - all difficult to take. But one goes on, hand in hand with them all. Yes, there is a sort of family tree at the beginning of the series, but then it gets all mixed up on one's mind just as it does in the lives of the characters.

One aspect that mystifies me: why is there so little information about the war and what happens on a larger scale after the war? Maybe they were all so caught up in their own dramas that, at least after the war, the political scene only mattered when it impacted their own lives.

Of course, one reads on to Book Three. Terrible things happen, some of their own making, but also imposed on them. The intelligentsia come off in a bad light.
Golden freddi
Masterful handling of point of view, Ferrante uses Lina's journals to allow Elena to give both her p.o.v. and Lina's. I love the entangled relationship of these two friends - the co-dependent, twisted, competitive side note of it. It reminds of the kind of relationship of sisters or childhood friends. Elena never quite trusts her own achievements, doubts her brilliance, believes Lina is the genesis of all her thoughts. Lina is so self destructive that the reader thinks she is mentally unstable. The place where this all plays out - Naples - could be any hood where people are poor and resources are limited, where there is a society of rich and poor, class and underclass. Lina could have been anything she wanted but she chooses money to boost her sense of self rather than persue her art, creativity, her intellect. It's a tragedy really. The text is feminist, social and political without preaching. Issues of then - the 60s, 70s, abuse of women, social and economic disadvantages, political thought - are still issues to be challenged today.
Quellik
I loved the first book, My Brilliant Friend, and didn't believe it could get better, but it does!
The drama of the two teen-age girls is more painful, more heartbreaking, and perhaps hard for some to take.
But their strength and beauty shines through, and we get to learn more about the history of post WWII Italy.
Some of this may be difficult to follow for those who are unfamiliar with Italian political and intellectual life.
But if you've read some Gramsci, you'll eat it up. It also deals with issues that are virtually universal among young women growing up all over the world. The book deals with frankly and insightfully with the challenges that teenage girls face as they grow into women, sexual, intellectual and political. It's feminist writing that doesn't wave any banners or slogans or propose any easy answers; it presents us face to face with the real challenges. Finally, I think Lila is one of the greatest heroines I have ever encountered, I love her every step of the way. It's all so personal and heart-felt, it's hard not to believe that much of it is based on the anonymous writer's own life. After all, the narrator is named Elena, and becomes a writer. But don't let the hype over the author's identity distract you: read these wonderful books for their own merits.