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Free eBook The Gates of the Alamo download

by Stephen Harrigan

Free eBook The Gates of the Alamo download ISBN: 0141000023
Author: Stephen Harrigan
Publisher: Penguin Books (March 1, 2001)
Language: English
Pages: 579
Category: Imaginative Literature
Subcategory: Genre Fiction
Size MP3: 1517 mb
Size FLAC: 1850 mb
Rating: 4.1
Format: txt docx mobi lrf


Brother Alamo Society member Stephen Harrigan set himself a daunting task when he undertook to retell the story of the Alamo in a way that would please general readers and historians and literary critics alike.

Brother Alamo Society member Stephen Harrigan set himself a daunting task when he undertook to retell the story of the Alamo in a way that would please general readers and historians and literary critics alike. It is a pleasure, and a relief, to discover that "The Gates of the Alamo" fully deserves all the praise it has received. As much as the Alamo siege serves to anchor and highlight the story, it is not the sole focus of the plot (and, indeed, only occupies a bare third.

Stephen Harrigan, a longtime writer for Texas Monthly and many other magazines, is the author of the novels Aransas and Jacob's Well. His other books include Water and Light: A Diver's Journey to a Coral Reef and the essay collections A Natural State and Comanche Midnight. He lives in Austin, Texas.

Stephen Harrigan (born 1948) is an American novelist, journalist and screenwriter. He is best known as the author of the bestselling The Gates of the Alamo, for other novels such as Remember Ben Clayton and A Friend of Mr. Lincoln, and for his magazine work in Texas Monthly.

Best-selling author Stephen Harrigan brings one of the pivotal battles in American history to life in this fiery, unforgettable .

Best-selling author Stephen Harrigan brings one of the pivotal battles in American history to life in this fiery, unforgettable novel. Edmund McGowan is a gifted naturalist whose life’s work is threatened by war. Mary Mott is a widowed innkeeper forced to rely on her own resources for survival. Mary’s 16-year-old son, Terrell, is a young man about to experience his first taste of love.

Stephen Harrigan is the author of ten books, including the NYT best seller 'The Gates o. .Check out this great listen on Audible. Best-selling author Stephen Harrigan brings one of the pivotal battles in American history to life in this fiery, unforgettable novel Stephen Harrigan.

Never before has the fall of the Alamo been portrayed with such immediacy. And for the first time the story is told not just from the perspective of the American defenders but from that of the Mexican attackers as well. We follow Blas Montoya, a sergeant in an elite sharpshooter company, as he fights to keep his men alive not only in the inferno of battle but also during the long forced march north from Mexico proper to Texas.

Stephen Harrigan is the author of three previous novels, Aransas, Jacob& Well, and The Gates of the Alamo. His nonfiction books include Water and Light& A Diver& Journey to a Coral Reef and the essay collections A Natural State and Comanche Midnight. The Eye of the Mammoth: Selected Essays.

Harrigan, Stephen, 1948-. New York : Penguin Books. Picture of the Fort of the Alamo and a view of San Antonio de Bèxar looking east toward the Fort of the Alamo. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Canon EOS 5D Mark II. City.

A huge, riveting, deeply imagined novel about the siege and fall of the Alamo in 1836--an event that formed the consciousness of Texas and that resonates through American history--The Gates of the Alamo follows the lives of three people whose fates become bound to the now-fabled Texas fort: Edmund McGowan, a proud and gifted naturalist whose life's work is threatened by the war against Mexico; the resourceful, widowed innkeeper Mary Mott; and her sixteen-year-old son, Terrell, whose first shattering experience with love leads him instead to war, and into the crucible of the Alamo. The story unfolds with vivid immediacy and describes the pivotal battle from the perspective of the Mexican attackers as well as the American defenders. Filled with dramatic scenes, and abounding in fictional and historical personalities--among them James Bowie, David Crockett, William Travis, and General Santa Anna--The Gates of the Alamo enfolds us in history and, through its remarkable and passionate storytelling, allows us to participate at last in an American legend.
User reviews
Coron
If someone asked me what the battle of the Alamo was all about, this is the book I'd recommend. Harrigan's fictional characters have richly detailed lives and personalities, and they blend seamlessly into the narrative of historical events and characters we've all heard about - Bowie, Crockett, Travis, Santa Anna et al. I had only a superficial knowledge of that history, but my sense is that Harrigan's story is based on wide and deep historical research, and that it reflects a balanced perspective on the motivations and actions of leaders - famous and infamous - and ordinary people on both sides of the struggle. Harrigan's real gift, though, is to make it all come alive through vibrant, full-color, story-telling.
Hrguig
Brother Alamo Society member Stephen Harrigan set himself a daunting task when he undertook to retell the story of the Alamo in a way that would please general readers and historians and literary critics alike. It has taken me almost two years to work up the nerve to read his long-awaited, painstakingly researched book. It is a pleasure, and a relief, to discover that "The Gates of the Alamo" fully deserves all the praise it has received.
As much as the Alamo siege serves to anchor and highlight the story, it is not the sole focus of the plot (and, indeed, only occupies a bare third or so of the book). Harrigan strolls leisurely through the year leading up to the Texas revolution, concentrating on his fictional characters and restricting most of the historical players to walk-on scenes. This is war as seen from ground level, and the primary players are not generals and politicians, but the innocents, bystanders, and journeymen swept up by events set in motion by men who cannot see the end results of what they are doing. One main character, unexpectedly, is an apolitical frontier botanist (Edmund McGowan); another is a widowed Refugio innkeeper, the sensible and resourceful Mary Mott, who is full of scorn for the grandstanding postures of men like the self-mythologizing Travis or Houston. Yet she, too, is carried away by their actions, as is her troubled son Terrell and the quietly courageous McGowan. Their fates remain linked throughout the simmering course of 1835 and, when the Mexican despot Santa Anna arrives with his army to crush the rebel Texians, they find themselves by design or happenstance together at the gates of the Alamo.
We experience the hardships of Santa Anna's private soldiers, too, in a way seldom explored by previous writers. Although el Presidente himself and several of his real-life subordinates appear (in brief but memorable scenes), the most finely drawn portraits are those of fictional soldados mexicanos, struggling to survive a brutal campaign and used as pawns by a leader who regards their lives as of no more value than "chickens". In this way, Santa Anna is perhaps uncomfortably close to some of the more blustering Texian commanders, agitating for an independence that will allow them unfettered pursuit of wealth and land. Harrigan would not be the first to make a subtle point about the common lament (put into these words during the Civil War), "rich man's war; poor man's fight." We see this most clearly through the eyes of Joe, Travis' slave, a survivalist who suspects his lot is not likely to improve no matter which side prevails.
If Alamo commander Travis is inclined to stoke his delusions of Walter Scott-inspired heroics, famous knife-fighter Bowie is occasionally little better than a pirate, albeit a mannered one. Their redeeming virtues are fortitude and courage, and a basic, dogged respect for a rough sort of democracy. The historical figure to come out looking the best to the modern reader is ex-Congressman David Crockett, whose legend is downplayed but whose quick wit and natural leadership qualities are key to holding the beleagured Alamo garrison together.
The attention to detail in this novel is tremendous, if perhaps overpowering to some casual readers, and it will reward those who already are familiar with this period and who will recognize many little touches and nuances. Even though much about the Alamo battle itself will forever remain unknown, there is little sense of the invented or the anachronistic in Harrigan's reconstruction. Almost everything rings true, although I wonder if some of the invective is too jarringly contemporary for the 1830s, and Mary Mott may strike some as being a singularly liberated woman for a relatively unliberated time (but not unbelieveably so, since it took toughness to survive on the frontier, something amply demonstrated in Mary's first appearance). I would personally have liked to see some native Bexareno characters, too, for another unique vantage point, or a chapter detailing the Texian attack on Bexar. Some historical events are handled almost *too* casually, as if the author was fearful of invoking cliches badly handled by Hollywood filmmakers: hence no dramatic Crockett arrival at the Alamo, no *deguello* played by the massed Mexican bands during the attack, no line in the sand drawn by Travis (but as Terrell Mott grumbles, "that never happened").
These are minor quibbles, and do little to detract from Harrigan's remarkable accomplishment. The final Mexican assault on the battered San Antonio mission is as powerful as anything ever written about war. The battle of San Jacinto sequence, where the Texians gain their terrible revenge for the massacres of the Alamo and Goliad, is maybe too abbreviated, but can hardly have been anything more than anticlimactic anyway. The book's coda wraps up loose ends and scrolls into the introduction, lending a suitably circular effect. The overall impression it left with me is one of profound sadness; there is a melancholy that suffuses "The gates of the Alamo," not martial clamor. It is ultimately a book about loss. When Terrell gazes at the facade of the ruined Alamo church, with its empty windows and gaping doorway, he doesn't see the "cradle of Texas liberty"; he pointedly sees the face of a grinning skull. It is a telling moment, and marks this book as a significant contribution to Texas literature.
Thozius
This story is spellbinding. The author made the events leading up to and including the historic battle at the Alamo come alive. And I don't mean the swashbuckling Hollywood versions or the sterile history book required readings. Real people on both sides of the conflict and how they dealt with the harsh reality of life during those times made it hard to put the book down. The author obviously spent a great deal of time in research and the few liberties he took with the known history of the event did nothing but make the story even better. As a history buff, I loved it. As an avid reader I was captivated. As an individual who tries to write, I am humbled. If you like historical fiction you can't miss this one. If you just like history period, read this book.
White gold
This novel was a fairly easy one to follow. It included some actual history of the battle of the Alamo. I enjoyed having the maps to refer to while reading the story. The love story that went along in the book was very touching. I am sure that that time of history had many hardships for the people settling Texas, and the story brought that out in its descriptions.
Ballardana
Slooow...200+ pages in and we've yet to enter the Alamo. Struggling to finish. Historical figures, (Bowie, Austin) little more than caricatures. Hoping for an increase in pace and action in the last half...
Lost Python
Having lived in San Antonio my whole life, "Gates of the Alamo" has given me a new perspective on my city. It is one of the better historical documents of a part of history which over the decades has been cluttered with exaggeration and misinformation. The reader will certainly get a much broader understanding of the war with Mexico through reading this novel vs watching a John Wayne movie. For a local this is the perfect novel to make one realize that the very ground we live and work on every day here in San Antonio was at one time the theater for a whole different kind of existence, a difficult one at that, and the stage for a cause much greater than our daily troubles today with traffic, life in the big city etc. I would highly recommend reading this book before a visit to San Antonio. It would give your visit a whole different meaning. Aside from that, I highly recommend just reading the book if you want to read a really great novel you will not be disappointed with - but plan on many late nights, as it is hard to put down at times.
Dammy
This is a great read. Mr. Harrigan spent a lot of ime researching this event from both sides of the battle. It is an historic novel based on fact. All the original people surrounding this event are in the book, along with the proper amount of fictitional characters intertwined to make an interesting story. A lot of well researched information from both the Mexican side, and the American side is presented in this book. Much can be learned of life in general in the early 1800's in Texas. One of those books that is hard to put down, yet much is learned while enjoying a good novel. I highly recommend it to anyone interested in early American frontier history.
Love