Free eBook A Perfect Spy download

by John le Carre,Michael Jayston

Free eBook A Perfect Spy download ISBN: 0754005569
Author: John le Carre,Michael Jayston
Publisher: Chivers Press Ltd; New Ed edition (October 2000)
Language: English
Category: Imaginative Literature
Subcategory: Genre Fiction
Size MP3: 1912 mb
Size FLAC: 1174 mb
Rating: 4.1
Format: azw docx mobi lit


Over the course of his seemingly irreproachable life, Magnus Pym has been all things to all people: a devoted family man, a trusted colleague, a loyal friend-and the perfect spy. But in the wake of his estranged father’s death, Magnus vanishes, and the British Secret Service is up in arms. In A Perfect Spy, John le Carré has crafted one of his crowning masterpieces, interweaving a moving and unusual coming-of-age story with a morally tangled chronicle of modern espionage.

A perfect spy. JOHN LE CARRÉ, the pseudonym for David Cornwell, was a member of the British Foreign Service from 1959 to 1964. His third novel, The Spy Who Came In from the Cold, became a worldwide bestseller. With the exception perhaps of the much later The Constant Gardener, A Perfect Spy remains for me the preferred novel of all my work, the one I sweated blood for, and ultimately, for that reason, the most rewarding.

A Perfect Spy (1986) by British author John le Carré is a novel about the mental and moral dissolution of a high level secret agent. A Perfect Spy is the life story of Magnus Pym, a British intelligence officer and double agent

A Perfect Spy (1986) by British author John le Carré is a novel about the mental and moral dissolution of a high level secret agent. A Perfect Spy is the life story of Magnus Pym, a British intelligence officer and double agent. After attending his father's funeral, Pym mysteriously disappears.

John le Carré (Author), Michael Jayston (Narrator), Penguin Audio (Publisher). From what I could find A Perfect Spy seemed pretty high up on everyone's list and received strong accolades from various individuals who had dived into the Le Carre literature at the same place. Get this audiobook plus a second, free. From what I could find A Perfect Spy seemed pretty high up on everyone's list and received strong accolades from various individuals who had dived into the Le Carre literature at the same place jarring. Since it shifts perspective, the reader follows behind the lens of one of the following: The main character in the present. The main character's recollection of the past. The main character's spy boss. The main character's wife. I think that's it, from what I remember.

In A Perfect Spy, John le Carré has crafted one of his crowning .

In A Perfect Spy, John le Carré has crafted one of his crowning masterpieces, interweaving a moving and unusual coming-of-age story with a morally tangled chronicle of modern espionage. The technical business of spying is much less important in this book than Le Carré's inquiry into what deception does to personal relationships - Magnus may be a Perfect Spy in that he seems to be able to subordinate everything to the requirements of professional cover, but what does that really mean for his life and for those around him?

John le Carre's classic novels deftly navigate readers through the intricate shadow worlds of international . A Perfect Spy is largely autobiographical.

John le Carre's classic novels deftly navigate readers through the intricate shadow worlds of international espionage with unsurpassed skill and knowledge, and have earned him unprecedented worldwide acclaim. Le Carre's mother vanished when he was three, in the same way that Pym loses his mother at an early age. Like Pym's father Rick, Le Carre’s father Ronnie Cornwell was a charismatic, larger-than-life con man who spent time in prison.

By John le Carré Read by Michael Jayston. Part of Penguin Audio Classics. About A Perfect Spy. From the New York Times bestselling author of A Legacy of Spies. John le Carré’s new novel, Agent Running in the Field, is coming October 2019. Over the course of his seemingly irreproachable life, Magnus Pym has been all things to all people: a devoted family man, a trusted colleague, a loyal friend-and the perfect spy.

David John Moore Cornwell (born 19 October 1931), better known by the pen name John le Carré (/ləˈkæreɪ/), is a British author of espionage novels. During the 1950s and 1960s, he worked for both the Security Service (MI5) and the Secret Intelligence. During the 1950s and 1960s, he worked for both the Security Service (MI5) and the Secret Intelligence Service (MI6). His third novel, The Spy Who Came in from the Cold (1963), became an international best-seller and remains one of his best-known works. Following the success of this novel, he left MI6 to become a full-time author.

Reader: Michael Jayston. David John Moore Cornwell, better known by the pen name John le Carré, is a British author of espionage novels. Most of le Carré's books are spy stories set during the Cold War and portray British Intelligence agents as unheroic political functionaries aware of the moral ambiguity of their work and engaged more in psychological than physical drama. His novels emphasise the fallibility of Western democracy and of the secret services protecting it, often implying the possibility of East-West moral equivalence.

User reviews
Jare
This was my first John Le Carre novel. I had some trepidations going in, and so I consulted a wide swath of Le Carre fan sites to figure out how to jump in (read: I Googled a bunch of stuff, but with a keen eye). From what I could find A Perfect Spy seemed pretty high up on everyone's list and received strong accolades from various individuals who had dived into the Le Carre literature at the same place.

I can tell you, the writing style is ... jarring. Since it shifts perspective, the reader follows behind the lens of one of the following:

The main character in the present.
The main character's recollection of the past.
The main character's spy boss.
The main character's wife.
I think that's it, from what I remember. Now, here's where it can get a little confusing: sometimes, the main character, Magnus Pym, uses the third person to discuss his past. Sometimes, he uses first-person. It could get incredibly disorienting as a reader--if this doesn't bother you, then skip to the next paragraph. But for me, it constantly interrupted the flow of the book and drove me absolutely batty. We all carry in our own baggage, so this might not bother everyone. Fair warning, though.

Beyond that, the book is an absolute masterpiece. If you've ever craved a spy novel that fleshes out the entire back-story of a master spy, then this is perfect. The characters are flawed. They have motivations. They have traumas. They have purpose--both thematically and in the story itself. And through it all, Le Carre guides the reader through the life of Magnus Pym. You can actually see how he becomes the man who exists in the present-day chapters. It's a blast. It lets you empathize with him and at the same time question his judgment.

That kind of challenge is exactly what I crave from fiction. I want to understand the character and empathize with them. I want them to challenge me and frustrate me and occasionally please me. Magnus Pym does all of this, and in writing his "explanation" to his son he lets us see the world he grew up in, and a father who both loved him and disadvantage him.
shustrik
Not much to add to the well-deserved praise this novel has received. I've ready many of LeCarré's novels but always skipped by this one. I took the plunge and it was well worth the trouble. I hesitated because the book has a formidable reputation. I can tell you that it is deserved. This is a long, difficult book that rewards patience and trust on the part of the reader. You will be lost at times -- unsure if you are in the past or present, young or old, Pym or his father Ricky. And that's how Pym lives his life -- he's as unstuck as Vonnegut's Billy Pilgrim. The effect is mesmerizing but if you're epecting a quick Len Deighton novel you're going to be in for a shock.

Some readers have expressed surprise at the ending. I don't know how. LeCarré telegraphs it in a hundred ways. But I can give this massive, confusing, complicated and difficult book my highest praise -- I slowed down my reading as I approached the end. I didn't want to get to the forgone conclusion and leave this oh so British world, these people or this maddening book. You won't either.
Cemav
I have read many of LeCarre's novels. While they are all complex and subtle in their own ways, this is the most intricate and challenging. At times, and in ways, that simply makes it worth the effort. But in other ways, that makes it less enjoyable and more inaccessible. Magnus Pym is an intriguing character, but he is not as endearing or as ingratiating or George Smiley. I am happy I did the work necessary to navigate through this book, and some of the prose was breathtaking. But it also frustrated me at times and kept me wishing for something more satisfying. A very good book and worthy of the experience. But if you are searching for LeCarre's greatest, go to the Karla Trilogy.
Steamy Ibis
Certainly one of the best spy novels I have ever read because it is so much more than that. It is a book that will never age because it is about is about deception, betrayal, friendship, loyalties,love, believes, relationships and so much more that will never go out of fashion. If one is looking for a fast-paced hard action thriller it is not recommended but there is more than enough tension to keep you involved and the writing and the construction of the book is so well done that it puts prize-winning novels in the shade. The characterization of all the players in the spy game is totally convincing and as with most of Le Carre's books is has a superbly well-written ending.
Skiletus
Captivating study of Pym. Convoluted forces twist an individual's sense of self, and conspire to eventual betrayal of not only those he holds close, but himself most of all.
Kanek
Is this really the best British novel after 1945? For me, it was little bit boring, with quite a good start (something happened, but you do not know what) but then going worse. Especially I have problem to believe into main plot - friendship between British and Czech secret agent. As I am Czech, the things about Czechoslovakia were especially ridiculous for me. They are no lime trees and cicadas in Czech or Slovak Republics (our climate is similar to Bavaria or Austria), no mountains "north of Pilsen" and you will not see from Church of Týnský chrám into Franz Kafka's last apartment (you can check it on Google maps). There were no Russian troops or nuclear devices before 1968 and even after their invasion, there were no Russian troops or nuclear factories or devices "south of Pilsen". And as Czechs does not like Germans very much (especially after WW II), you did not find too many Germans in their secret service (i.e. StB). Also, Czech national beverage is not vodka, but beer. In the beginning, I was wondering, why this book was not translated into Czech language (as many John Le Carré's books were). After reading of this book, I realized it.
Heraly
Not everyone cares for LeCarre's style as the story unfolds slowly sometimes. This is one that I stayed in until the end.