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Free eBook The Burning Stone (Crown of Stars, Vol. 3) download

by Kate Elliott

Free eBook The Burning Stone (Crown of Stars, Vol. 3) download ISBN: 0886778158
Author: Kate Elliott
Publisher: DAW Books (August 1, 2000)
Language: English
Category: Imaginative Literature
Subcategory: Genre Fiction
Size MP3: 1424 mb
Size FLAC: 1544 mb
Rating: 4.5
Format: rtf mobi doc txt


The Burning Stone book.

The Burning Stone book. It is a crucial time in the war-torn kingdoms of Wendar and Varre, a moment when even one wrong decision can tilt the balance of events into total disaster.

PROLOGUE HE had ran this far without being caught, but he knew his Quman master still followed him. Convulsive shudders shook him where he huddled in the brush that crowded a stream. His robes were still damp At last he calmed himself enough to listen to the lazy flow of water and to the wind rustling through leaves.

In the third volume of this astonishing Nebula Awardnominated fantasy series the many plot strands created in the first two novels become . say I am rabid for the next book. -B&N Explorations.

In the third volume of this astonishing Nebula Awardnominated fantasy series the many plot strands created in the first two novels become more tightly interwovenas the time of the cataclysm nears when people and places long sundered by magic will once again reside in the same time and universe. I can now honestly say I am rabid for the next book. Theres a bonedeep reality to the world. quot Fantasy amp Science Fiction.

The Novels of the Jaran. His conquering sword. amp; with Melanie Rawn and Jennifer Roberson.

The series consists of seven novels. Novels in the series are: King's Dragon (1997). Prince of Dogs (1998). The Burning Stone (1999). Child of Flame (2000). The Gathering Storm (2003).

Kelly Elliott I can now honestly.

It is a crucial time in the war-torn kingdoms of Wendar and Varre, a moment when even one wrong decision can tilt the balance of events into total disaster. For Sanglant-King Henry’s son-and Liath-the woman he loves-the offer of both a haven from their enemies and the chance for Liath to study the ancient lore with those who claim her as their own, seems like the answer they have been seeking. But no place can truly.

By (author) Kate Elliot.

Set in an alternate Europe where bloody conflicts rage, the third book of the Crown of Stars epic fantasy series continues the world-shaking conflict for the survival of humanityIt is a crucial time in the war-torn kingdoms of Wendar and Varre, a moment when even one wrong decision can tilt the balance of events into total disaster. For Sanglant—King Henry’s son—and Liath—the woman he loves—the offer of both a haven from their enemies and the chance for Liath to study the ancient lore with those who claim her as their own, seems like the answer they have been seeking. But no place can truly be safe for them. Both their lives and their love will be at risk when they are forced to choose which pathway each will follow—lured by the equally strong demands of politics, forbidden knowledge, and family. Liath, born with a dangerous power beyond her control, is torn between her longing for Sanglant and the child they are about to have and the call of sorcery, which can open the way into the land of the Aoi, the Lost Ones. And even as Liath struggles with magic’s seductive spell, Sanglant’s Aoi mother returns to the mortal world, seeking the son she abandoned as a babe. As the fates of kingdoms shift with the changing fortunes of those caught up in the dangers of both civil war and continuing attacks by the nonhuman Eika and the Quman invaders, time is running out for Liath, Sanglant, King Henry, and the people of Wendar and Varre. For the time of cataclysm is fast approaching—and no one can foretell who will survive—or rule—when it is over….
User reviews
Precious
This review is for the entire seven-volume series, which must be read in order. I'm going to post it for each book, without variation, so no need to read it more than once.

None of the books stands alone. I'd guess the total word count approaches 2 million, which is 15-20 conventional novels. It took me 7-and-a-half weeks to read, but I'm not a fast reader. The setting is modeled on medieval Europe in the Ottonian age (10th century) and does a good job of it in the context of the fantasy elements. The story follows people who are themselves nobility or who serve and regularly interact with the nobility. This is, like its analog, a world centered on secular dynasties that intermarry entirely for political reasons and on a deeply rooted religious culture (where many younger sons and daughters are parked with or without any vocation). Sorcery is forbidden, but it is practiced by some even so.

The plot is extremely complex, and there are several point-of-view characters we follow through all seven volumes. There are three main villains; I found one of them quite entertaining, despite her despicable acts of black magic, because she has talked herself into believing that everything she does is for the sake of religious purity rather than her own lust for power.

Early on, I wanted to shake the lead female character to put some sense into her (she is very young at the start), but I enjoyed her growth into self knowledge and watching her learn how to harness her power (it's fantasy, I know, but I still find that the tale of her origins strains credulity). Interesting that I found only one character completely likable (Rosvita).

Rather than summarize the plot, I'll point out some other likes and dislikes.

Likes
How the religious heresy develops and spreads (in a reversal of Christian orthodoxy and heterodoxy); some of this is comical, given who is doing the spreading
Pursuit of knowledge as something some characters desire above all else.
Rosvita (the best of the secondary leads)
Development of the longstanding consequences of Alain's early act of compassion.
The faithful hounds
Women have agency and men can be victims of a powerful woman's lust (truer in the real world than in most fiction).
Wolfhere (a mysterious non-POV character who is close to a tragic figure).

Dislikes
Too much time and detail on the astrology. Yes, it's central, but a little went a long way. I sympathized with the characters who rolled their eyes over it.
The other seven sleepers. This never really went anywhere.
The Heleniad, Augustina, Gregoria, and so on—amusing a time or two; after that, insistence on female analogs just got tiresome (no problem with them being females; just thought the name game was silly)
Romanticizing primitive lifestyles (the Adica storyline and the Ashioi). One, I don't buy the noble savage and two, once was enough.

On the whole, I liked the series, but it does require a considerable investment of time.
Fawrindhga
It is so easy to get sucked into the world of "Crown of Stars" and I have stayed up late, awakened early and neglected chores simply to immerse myself in it. There is only one teeny tiny complaint. If I have to read the phrase "but his voice always sounded like that" too many more times, I'm going to scream! I went back through the first 3 books of the series (thank you Kindle search in book) and that phrase appears 2 or 3 times in each volume. Look, we get it that Sanglant's voice is hoarse due to some battle injury but we don't need to be reminded of it every time he speaks. It's repetitive and annoying. It's bad enough that his name is pronounced Sahn-glawnt or Sawn-glawnt and I trip over it every time the name appears. Other than those petty objections, these books are brilliant and do parallel our own medieval period except with women being generally more powerful than men and, of course, the magic and mythical beasts added to spice things up. I think this series can be counted among my top 10 favorites of all time.
Abywis
An uncertain and uneasy peace has fallen on the kingdom of Wendar, but at the court of King Henry the various factions still jockey relentlessly and ruthlessly for position. It seems that the king's favor has fallen upon Prince Sanglant, his [...]son, and that he is to be the chosen heir. But Sanglant is too troubled by the recent past to seek that crown. He needs time to recover and, most of all, he needs Liath, the woman who saved him from his terrible captivity - even though such a liaison must incur his father's implacable wrath. Liath, born with a dangerous power beyond her understanding or ability to control, is torn between her longing for Sanglant and the child they are about to have and the call of sorcery, which can open the way into the land of the Aoi, the Lost Ones. She has also learned that her mother, a powerful practitioner of the banned sorcerous arts, is not dead, as she always thought, and is seeking her to school her in the same arts. And Alain, their friend and ally, although happily restored to the bosom of his family and married to the saintly Tallia, is in mortal danger from the curse of Bloodheart, who is reaching out from the grave. As the fates of kingdoms shift with the changing fortunes of those caught up in the dangers of both civil war and continuing attacks by the nonhuman Eika and the Quman invaders, time is running out for Liath, Sanglant, King Henry, and the people of Wendar and Varre.

It has been quite a while since I read a series and thought "damn, it's over!" at the end. The author has built a vast number of interesting characters but, despite the number, one is able to know and relate to each. Each of the characters has their own remarkable flaws and imperfections, and you actaully have opportunities to sympathize with each throughout the series (even the remarkably "evil" ones you think you would never agree with). Unlike the Robert Jordan WoT series which seems to go on and on and on without resolution, Elliot has squeezed a sweeping epic into a (mere) 7 books, and I found myself disappointed when I finished the last of the third book. Fortunately, there are enough open issues, unanswered questions and unresolved conflicts in the end that Elliot could forseeably write another series to "fill in the blanks". I, for one, sincerely hope to see more from this author in the very near future.
LadyShlak
The third book in the Crown of Stars series is starting to lose me. I loved the first two books because I fell in love with the characters and really got involved in the story telling, but this book is starting to get too rambling and complicated to be enjoyable. I really want to keep reading this series but I just hope the author can unravel some of the tangles she's created otherwise I may have to bail on this whole series.