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Free eBook The Dead Zone (CH) download

by Stephen King

Free eBook The Dead Zone (CH) download ISBN: 0708981577
Author: Stephen King
Publisher: Charnwood; Large Print edition (December 1, 1983)
Language: English
Pages: 656
Category: Imaginative Literature
Subcategory: Genre Fiction
Size MP3: 1694 mb
Size FLAC: 1869 mb
Rating: 4.5
Format: azw mobi mbr lrf


The Dead Zone is a Horror novel by Stephen King. John Smith, who awakened from an interminable coma with an accursed power-the power to see the future and the terrible fate awaiting mankind in The Dead Zone.

The Dead Zone is a Horror novel by Stephen King. List Chapter or Page: 1. PART ONE The Wheel of Fortune PROLOGUE. 2. PART ONE The Wheel of Fortune Chapter One. 3. PART ONE The Wheel of Fortune Chapter Two. 4. PART ONE The Wheel of Fortune Chapter Three. 5. PART ONE The Wheel of Fortune Chapter Four.

The Dead Zone is a horror/supernatural thriller novel by Stephen King published in 1979. It is his seventh novel and the fifth novel under his own name. It concerns Johnny Smith, who is injured in an accident and remains in a coma for nearly five years. Upon emergence, he exhibits clairvoyance and precognition with limitations, apparently because of a "dead zone," an area of his brain that suffered permanent damage as the result of his accident.

An unusual novel for King, this is a slow-burn thriller that sees 'genre' getting very close to 'literary' fiction. The Dead Zone was the strangest experience of my rereading experiment thus far. It's the first book that is totally different to my memories of it; to the point where I even doubted that I had read it, and hadn't just watched the (admittedly excellent) David Cronenberg movie adaptation too much. I had read it, though – I still have the original copy to prove it – but it had slipped from my mind almost completely

While working in the book business, I have always puzzled over why Stephen King was read by so many people

While working in the book business, I have always puzzled over why Stephen King was read by so many people.

Читать онлайн The Dead Zone.

Stephen King The Dead Zone PROLOGUE . y the time he graduated from college, John Smith had forgotten all about the bad fall he took on the ice that January day in 1953. In fact, he would have been hard put to remember it by the time he graduated from grammar school. And his mother and father never knew about it at al. hey were skating on a cleared patch of Runaround Pond in Durham. The bigger boys were playing hockey with old tape. Читать онлайн The Dead Zone.

Stephen King is the author of more than sixty books, all of them worldwide bestsellers

Stephen King is the author of more than sixty books, all of them worldwide bestsellers. His recent work includes The Institute, Elevation, The Outsider, Sleeping Beauties (cowritten with his son Owen King), and the Bill Hodges trilogy: End of Watch, Finders Keepers, and Mr. Mercedes (an Edgar Award winner for Best Novel and an AT&T Audience Network original television series).

The Dead Zone is the eighth book published by Stephen King; it is his seventh novel, and the fifth novel under his own name. The book was the first of King's novels published by Viking Press in August 1979. In 1953, a young boy named Johnny Smith suffers an accident while ice-skating; while recovering he mumbles "Don't jump it no more" to an adult on the scene. A few months later the adult is seriously injured while jump starting a car battery.

There are better King books. The Bottom Line: Great for a Stephen King fan. Great for someone who is interested in the premise. Great for someone looking for an easy, relatable read. However, this novel treats death and relationships (past and present) with an interesting spin due to the supernatural and psychological premise. This book is not as scary as it is intense, not as horrific as it is the kind of book to stick a block of dread in the middle of your stomach, page per page. Literary Merit: None. This is a genre novel, by an author at the top of his genre.

User reviews
Gerceytone
The only criticism I have of this book is that I wish I had read it sooner. It was recommended to me by a Stephen King fan that caught on to his brilliance as an author before I did. When I asked which King novel I should read next, he replied "in an election year, The Dead Zone of course". So happy I took his recommendation. It is eerie how relevant so much of this novel is given that it was 40+ years ago. Well developed, well written, several twists, I missed the characters being part of my day when I finished. Highly recommend this book, especially when we have an election coming our way! It would be interesting to see the same story told with the invention of social media and all news all the time.
Jorad
It's Stephen King. You either like his writing, or you're not even reading this review, because you'd never buy something of his. I saw that some other reviewers complained that this book was slow-paced or boring. I did not find that to be the case, but the thing I've always loved most about King's writing is the care he puts into crafting his characters. They are real people, who live on in your mind, with all their virtues and flaws. For the ultimate example of this, I always cite King's The Stand, whether we're talking about Stephen King or not. Masterful. Just masterful. So, I didn't mind that we didn't jump right into the precognition stuff. I had watched the movie with Christopher Walken many years ago (I know, sacrilege to watch the movie first.), as I slowly built up my King library (ultimate goal--everything King has ever written), but hadn't read the book until now. I don't remember how the movie wrapped things up, so am trying not to write any spoilers, but that intense character building King does paid off in a big way at the end. I was wrecked, emotionally wrecked, and cursing Stephen King's name, even as I was saying, "So good. So freaking good. You got me again, Mr. King."

The takeaway is that, if you have a King section in your library, this deserves to be in it. If you're a King fan and haven't read this, you should. If you feel like I do, that one of King's greatest strength is his character development, then, I think you'll enjoy this.
Gandree
Readability: Moderate to Easy. Full of common language: relatable phrases and cliché's. Simple, clear language. Explicit words found throughout.

Novel Premise: Interesting! If you could travel back in time and kill Hitler, knowing what you know now, would you? Similarly, if you knew a politician running for office today would be the cause of the end of the world, would you assassinate said politician? And what would it be like if you were put into a coma, only to wake up years later, your life forever altered? There is an interesting romantic element to the novel, though tragic, and not the central topic.

Overall Impression: You'll be sucked in by the novel, though not right away. Give it 25 pages. Once King has you in his grips, per usual, you will not be able to put the book down. There are better King books. However, this novel treats death and relationships (past and present) with an interesting spin due to the supernatural and psychological premise. This book is not as scary as it is intense, not as horrific as it is the kind of book to stick a block of dread in the middle of your stomach, page per page.

Literary Merit: None. This is a genre novel, by an author at the top of his genre. Compared to his better works, this ranks higher than, say, books like 'The Tommyknockers' or 'Gerald's Game', but does not come close to novels like 'The Shining' or 'The Stand' where literary methods are in better representation.

The Bottom Line: Great for a Stephen King fan. Great for someone who is interested in the premise. Great for someone looking for an easy, relatable read. Not for someone who is a horror-novel junkie, you'll be underwhelmed. Not for someone who dislikes thriller novels, you might get queasy. I liked the book and rated it four stars out of five.
Vozilkree
I'm not sure why I've given this 4 stars. King's reputation? The fact that I normally enjoy his books, late to them though I am? there's a half decent story somewhere in this, but....... I found it structurally dissatisfying, the whole somewhat spoilt by character storylines dealt with too early, and too randomly to fit within the whole book. I always go along with King's foray into the unknown in order to accept the storyline, disregarding my personal beliefs. And this book was no different, only I didn't buy his approach to reveals and character portrayals, as they were ordered in the story. It was uneven, and heavy handed. But should I dare criticise? And at this late stage. Yes, it WAS the least satisfying King story that I've read to date, but the John Smith main character was well set and meaningful. As I've hinted, it was the unfolding of the story that perplexed me, that relating to one character simply not blended sufficiently well into the whole. It didn't fit. His role was of no substance to what went before, when at last we arrived at his relevance. So, disappointed? Yes. This time round.