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Free eBook The Disappearance of Lyndsey Barratt download

by John Wilson

Free eBook The Disappearance of Lyndsey Barratt download ISBN: 0006499821
Author: John Wilson
Publisher: HarperCollins; New Ed edition (March 15, 1999)
Language: English
Pages: 432
Category: Imaginative Literature
Subcategory: Genre Fiction
Size MP3: 1925 mb
Size FLAC: 1912 mb
Rating: 4.5
Format: mbr mobi mobi doc


Lyndsey Barratt mysteriously disappeared after. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Disappearance Of Lyndsey Barratt as Want to Read

Lyndsey Barratt mysteriously disappeared after. Start by marking The Disappearance Of Lyndsey Barratt as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Lyndsey Barrett disappears after being gang raped by eleven members of a cricket team. In the years to follow the members begin to meet with violent deaths. A thrilling novel about revenge. com User, November 21, 1998. This is a thinking person's mystery. The "whodunit" is not really a mystery for most of the book, but the narrative is bold, unpredictable, and ultimately very rewarding for those who enjoy the thriller genre, especially those who admit to a taste for reading about serial killers.

Ruth Wilson is a British teenager from Betchworth, near Dorking in Surrey, England who disappeared on 27 November 1995. Ruth Wilson is the daughter of Ian and Nesta Wilson. Her mother was born in Wellingborough on 1 May 1948 and was given the name Nesta Landeg by her adoptive parents. Ian and Nesta were married in 1976 in Newport. When Wilson was four years old and her sister, Jenny, was a few months old, Nesta died

Carlton Lindsay Barrett (born 15 September 1941), also known as Eseoghene, is a Jamaican-born poet, novelist, essayist, playwright, journalist and photographer.

Carlton Lindsay Barrett (born 15 September 1941), also known as Eseoghene, is a Jamaican-born poet, novelist, essayist, playwright, journalist and photographer. Since 1966 he has lived in Nigeria, of which country he became a citizen in the mid-1980s.

Wilson's first US publication is an overblown British reworking of that all-American movie fantasy, the rape-revenge story. Hours after stellar student Lyndsey Barratt suffers the humiliation of receiving her drama-school diploma in the absence of her parents (her ineffectual father, who couldn't bear to be seen in public with her wheelchair-bound mother, begged off), she's suffering the torments of hell. Wilson's first US publication is an overblown British reworking of that all-American movie fantasy, the rape-revenge story.

The disappearance of old Owen Parfitt from his sister’s front porch in the English countryside isn’t nearly as famous as, say, the .

The disappearance of old Owen Parfitt from his sister’s front porch in the English countryside isn’t nearly as famous as, say, the disappearance of Amelia Earhart in 1937, but it’s even more mysterious. Strangely enough, Bennington was the site of several unsolved disappearances that took place in the 1940s, including that of the wife of James Tetford, whom Tetford claimed went to the market and never returned.

Are you sure you want to remove The disappearance of Lyndsey Barratt from your list? The disappearance of Lyndsey Barratt

The disappearance of Lyndsey Barratt. Are you sure you want to remove The disappearance of Lyndsey Barratt from your list? The disappearance of Lyndsey Barratt. a psychological thriller.

Ruth Wilson, 16, vanished after being dropped off by a taxi on Box Hill, Dorking in Surrey back in 1995. Ruth's friend, Catherine, says a dark secret about her mum's death could have sparked the disappearance. Ruth had been told she died after falling down the stairs and breaking her neck, but in October 1995 she went to London to examine her mother's death certificate. It was here she learned the truth - that Nesta had killed herself when Ruth was just three year old.

User reviews
Saberdragon
I found this book in a thrift shop, and figured that if I read it and it wasn't any good, I wouldn't have spent much money. I have very mixed feelings about this book because it was kind of uneven. It started out very slowly, but did pick up steam in the last half. Another reviewer mentioned that this book could have been great, but wasn't, and I agree. I guessed the plot twist fairly early on, and was very disappointed in the ending. I gave it two stars only because it did hold my interest in the second half, but it could have been so much better.
invasion
John Wilson is a competent wordsmith-- that is, I really didn't find any particular sentence, paragraph, or piece of dialog that made me toss the book into the Bin o' Hacks. The pace builds, things happen, there's sort of a climax. That being said, this is a Plot Full o' Holes. The more I've thought about it since finishing it the less sense it makes. People's actions don't line up with motivations, loose ends abound. I mean, it REALLY doesn't make any sense. Can't explain why without giving spoilers, but it's not a head-scratching "I don't get it". Furthermore, the primary plot element--which becomes the big reveal at the end-- is the most tired and cliche device I can think of for a "psychological thriller." I spotted it less than halfway through... I did read to the finish, but really just to see if that was actually what it was. And yes, it was. And no, it made no sense.

Whatever it lacks in plotting (a LOT), it makes up for in sex and violence. This is NC-17 stuff, and it comes perilously close to becoming the harcore porn that figures heavily in the story. Tastes differ, but for me a bad taste lingered.

This isn't the worst, or most laughably incompetent, book I've run across ('Vector' by Robin Cook wins that prize), so I give it two stars, but trust me... save your money and your time and find something with a little more internal consistency.
Whiteflame
First let me say that Mr. Wilson is a very competent wordsmith... that is, no particular paragraph or bit of dialogue made me groan. His pacing is good, the excitement builds well, etc. But this plot has more holes that Albert Hall (I'm dating myself, I know). The central fact of the plot, that becomes the 'surprise' twist at the end, is obvious from about halfway through, not to mention that it's one of the oldest tricks in the book for a "psychological thriller." And there are plenty of "Huh?" moments where motivation, action, and consequence don't line up.

Your taste for sex and violence won't be disappointed though. I'm no prude, but the graphic scenes with which the book is liberally stocked skirt very close to becoming the hardcore pornography that figures prominently in the plot.

I rate it three stars because it held my interest long enough to finish it, but it was largely to see whether the hoary old chestnut I spotted in the middle turned out to be the actual ending, and yes. It was.

There are many, many more satisying meals out there, people.
Daron
The fact that this is a first attempt at a full-length novel by this author is glaringly apparent by his style of simple prose and over-explaining in many parts of the book.
Mr. Wilson tries to inject the science of "criminal profiling" into this work, but ends up giving his readers an over-simplified definition.
The dialogues were extremely fake and animated. The characters were not very believable. And I find his overuse of lesbian stereotypes extremely disturbing.
The promising synopsis led me to purchase this book, and I felt like I could've spent my time and money elsewhere after finishing it.
Usishele
If I hadn't read the last chapter of this book, I would be able to give it a 4 or 5 star easily. But this book, which had great characterizations, characters in the story you could really root for, and a 'surprise' twist near the end (which I saw coming, but I know others might not), completely falls apart in the last chapter. A ridiculous ending that doesn't match up with *ANYTHING* the author wrote in the rest of the book. I very much wish I could go into the reasons *why* it fell apart, but unfortunately to do so would spoil the book for others. Although in my opinion, save your money and don't even bother reading this one. I'm still angry over the ending and it's been 4 days since I finished it. I'm angry that this book was SO CLOSE to greatness, only to fall apart on the home stretch.
Kulwes
This is a thinking person's mystery. The "whodunit" is not really a mystery for most of the book, but the narrative is bold, unpredictable, and ultimately very rewarding for those who enjoy the thriller genre, especially those who admit to a taste for reading about serial killers. Jolly good show.
Anaragelv
Wow, what book did "a reader from Chicago" read? Well, it sure wasn't this one. Very well plotted British mystery. Showcases the differences between the British and American police laws, policies and investigative styles. The characters are very true to life - I could practically see the story in my mind as I read. Excellent. I look forward to the next one!
This book grabbed me from the first chapter and never let go. Very well written and a bit twisted, which made you wonder where it was going to go next. You won't be disappointed!