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Free eBook Slaughterhouse-Five (or The Children's Crusade: A Duty Dance with Death) download

by Hawke Ethan,Kurt Vonnegut

Free eBook Slaughterhouse-Five (or The Children's Crusade: A Duty Dance with Death) download ISBN: 0060573775
Author: Hawke Ethan,Kurt Vonnegut
Publisher: Caedmon; Unabridged edition (November 4, 2003)
Language: English
Category: Imaginative Literature
Subcategory: Genre Fiction
Size MP3: 1457 mb
Size FLAC: 1131 mb
Rating: 4.1
Format: doc azw lrf azw


A Duty-dance with Death KURT VONNEGUT, JR. This book is published at a net price and is supplied subject to the Publishers Association Standard Conditions of Sale registered under the Restrictive Trade Practices Act, 1956

A Duty-dance with Death KURT VONNEGUT, J. .This book is published at a net price and is supplied subject to the Publishers Association Standard Conditions of Sale registered under the Restrictive Trade Practices Act, 1956.

Kurt Vonnegut's absurdist classic Slaughterhouse-Five introduces us to Billy Pilgrim, a man who becomes 'unstuck in time' after he is abducted by aliens from the planet Tralfamadore. In a plot-scrambling display of virtuosity.

Slaughterhouse-Five, or The Children's Crusade: A Duty-Dance with Death is a science fiction-infused anti-war novel by Kurt Vonnegut, first published in 1969. It follows the life and experiences of Billy Pilgrim, from his early years to his time as an American soldier and chaplain's assistant during World War II, to the postwar years, with Billy occasionally traveling through time itself

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Kurt Vonnegut's absurdist classic Slaughterhouse-Five introduces us to.The book has no structure or at the very least a perceivable one: it’s all over the place. But, it works so well.

Kurt Vonnegut's absurdist classic Slaughterhouse-Five introduces us to Billy Pilgrim, a man who becomes unstuck in time after he is abducted by aliens from the planet Tralfamadore. It cements the book’s message and purpose underlining its meaning.

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Slaughterhouse-Five: Or the Children's Crusade, a Duty-Dance With Death

Slaughterhouse-Five: Or the Children's Crusade, a Duty-Dance With Death. But it was precisely those elements of Vonnegut's writing-the political edginess, the genre-bending inventiveness, the frank violence, the transgressive wit-that have inspired generations of readers not just to look differently at the world around them but to find the confidence to say something about it.

Kurt Vonnegut Slaughterhouse-Five or The Children’s Crusade: A Duty-Dance with Death A fourth-generation German-American now living in easy circumstances on Cape Cod, who, as an American infantry scout hors de combat, as a prisoner of war, witnessed the fire-bombing of Dresden, Germany, The Florence of the Elbe, a long time ago, and survived to tell the tale.

Slaughterhouse-Five, Or The Children's Crusade : A Duty-dance with Death (1969) is a novel by Kurt Vonnegut. One of his most popular works and widely regarded as a classic, it combines science fiction elements with an analysis of the human condition from Absurdist perspectives, using time travel as a plot device. The bombing of Dresden in World War II, the aftermath of which Vonnegut witnessed, is the starting point.

Slaughterhouse-Five; or The Children's Crusade (1969) is the book that marked a turning point in Vonnegut's career

Slaughterhouse-Five; or The Children's Crusade (1969) is the book that marked a turning point in Vonnegut's career. Based on his experiences in Dresden, it is the story of another Vonnegut surrogate named Billy Pilgrim who travels back and forth in time and becomes a kind of modern-day Everyman. The novel was something of a cult book during the Vietnam era for its antiwar sentiments.

Kurt Vonnegut's absurdist classic Slaughterhouse-Five introduces us to Billy Pilgrim, a man who becomes 'unstuck in time' after he is abducted by aliens from the planet Tralfamadore. In a plot-scrambling display of virtuosity, we follow Pilgrim simultaneously through all phases of his life, concentrating on his (and Vonnegut's) shattering experience as an American prisoner of war who witnesses the firebombing of Dresden.

Slaughterhouse-Five is not only Vonnegut's most powerful book, it is also as important as any written since 1945. Like Catch-22, it fashions the author's experiences in the Second World War into an eloquent and deeply funny plea against butchery in the service of authority. Slaughterhouse-Five boasts the same imagination, humanity, and gleeful appreciation of the absurd found in Vonnegut's other works, but the book's basis in rock-hard, tragic fact gives it unique poignancy -- and humor.

User reviews
Jugami
I remember reading this in American Literature class, and I always wanted to come back to it because it's just one of those books that I don't think reading it once will suffice. There's obviously a lot more going on there than initially meets the eye.

There's the obvious story, which is about Billy Pilgrim, a veteran and optometrist who is seemingly suffering from some sort of mental illness like PTSD from his time in the war, and also some sort of possible brain damage suffered from an airplane crash. These elements compound each other and Billy finds himself traveling through time to different points in his life; during his time in World War II, during his time with his wife Valencia, on a planet inhabited by the Tralfamadorians (who have him locked up as a human zoo exhibit), and a few others.

But then there is the author's underlying messages, one of which is about the utter senselessness of war. The Germans are making candles out of the Jews while Americans are melting German teenagers and we all know that the Soviets were starving tens of millions of their own while fighting the Germans. It's just a vicious cycle of death and evil.

The other message is a philosophical one. There's a very strong sense that there is no free will and there is also a sense of nihilism that no matter what we do, the outcomes are fixed, and the future unchanging.

I hope that the philosophical message isn't a correct one. I tend to side with those who believe strongly that we are in control of our fates and that no matter how dire the circumstances, we have the choice to make things a little bit better. Ironically I think Vonnegut has done exactly that with his book. He has made an impact with this book by bringing awareness to the evils of war.

Read the book. It's a good one.
Auau
I know this a oldie but goodie book - but somehow I missed it all these years. Interesting reading it 50 years after it was published. It has passed the test of time. It is oddly engaging and unpredictable and just plain weird. This type of work can not be copied because it so utterly original. I can see how it was shocking in 1967 and was ultimately banned by some schools. Funny how that insured it would get the attention it deserved. This book retells the narrative of the WWII by someone who was there. Like all wars, I assume, there is absurdity, contradictions, unknown heros, small and big people that no one ever hears about. I have read a lot of books, fiction and non-fiction, about WWII and this book provided a colorful dynamic addition to all the thousands and thousands of books written on this subject. Where are all the Kurt Vonnegut's today? We need you so desperately.
Raelin
I didn’t know what to expect from this book, I had never read Vonnegut before and truly didn't know what this book would be like, I had high expectations, though. I’ve read great praise for this book and it was frequently recommended to me. Normally I try to avoid having high expectations for authors I don’t know because I’m usually disappointed. This was certainly an exception.
This is a quite unique book. A kind of Sci-fi that I hadn’t read before but that I really liked. Vonnegut does an excellent job mixing history with war criticism and science fiction. It seemed to me an odd combination that didn’t appeal to me at first. It’s probably because of this unlikely combination that this book is so peculiar.
It was a hard reading when I started (maybe I wasn’t in the proper mood) but then it flowed quite easy, the story absorbed me. The main character is pretty interesting: a time traveler and yet, quite a normal American. A soldier, and optometrist and a time traveler. Not the best soldier, a well-known optometrist by chance and average in every aspect but for time travel, and the fact that he was abducted by aliens. Maybe the fact that he is quite a normal guy makes relatable a tale so unrelatable.
This is a Sci-fi book yes, but I think that, more importantly this is a book about war. This book tries to portray war from the perspective of a soldier who survived and how he experienced all the horrors of war. This book reminded me slightly of Johnny Got His Gun . War is a terrible thing, and those who pay the ultimate price are young naïve soldiers and innocent victims.
Bedy
My high school English teacher gave me this book with the caution, Don't tell anyone I gave this to you. Guess I let her down here. A classic read and perhaps the one you want to start with when reading Vonnegut. Cat's Cradle is the only book in his bibliography that rivals this one. Restless and prodding writing that will make you laugh out loud and shake your head at the same time.