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Free eBook The Best Ghost Stories of H. Russell Wakefield download

by Richard Dalby,H. Russell Wakefield

Free eBook The Best Ghost Stories of H. Russell Wakefield download ISBN: 0897330668
Author: Richard Dalby,H. Russell Wakefield
Publisher: Academy Chicago Pub; First American Edition edition (October 1, 1982)
Language: English
Category: Imaginative Literature
Subcategory: Genre Fiction
Size MP3: 1273 mb
Size FLAC: 1881 mb
Rating: 4.4
Format: lrf rtf mobi lrf


Herbert Russell Wakefield (1888 – 2 August 1964) was an English short-story writer, novelist, publisher, and civil servant chiefly remembered today for his ghost stories.

Herbert Russell Wakefield (1888 – 2 August 1964) was an English short-story writer, novelist, publisher, and civil servant chiefly remembered today for his ghost stories. Wakefield was the third of four children of the clergyman Henry Russell Wakefield, who would become bishop of Birmingham in 1911.

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1928), novelette by H. Russell Wakefield The Triumph of Death, (1949), short story by H. Russell Wakefield. A Kink in Space-Time, (1948), short story by H. Professor Pownall's Oversight, (1928), short story by H. The Seventeenth Hole at Duncaster, (1928), short story by H. Look Up There!", (1929), short fiction by H. The Triumph of Death, (1949), short story by H. The Gorge of the Churels, (1951), short story by H. Immortal Bird", (1961), novelette by H. Death of a Bumblebee, (1967), novelette by H.

by H. Fourteen stories by one of this century's best writers of ghost stories. Library descriptions. No library descriptions found. Recently added by. tonythebook, elenchus, Manas1000, Ann Louise, bernardpkeegan, AshleyDioses, ovslibrary, Wolcott37, haw hex. LibraryThing members' description.

In her study of the genre, Night Visitors: The Rise and Fall of the English Ghost Story (1977), Julia Briggs manages only one mention of Wakefield, and even then gets her information wrong: she calls his first collection They Walk at Night. Russell Wakefield as Want to Read . James's reaction to Wakefield's first published anthology of ghost stories, They Return at Evening: "Mr. Wakefield," says the darling, dry Montague, "gives us a mixed bag, from which I would remove one or two that leave a nasty taste.

Release date 1978 (horror, short stories). Risingshadow is one of the largest science fiction and fantasy book databases. Run by dedicated speculative fiction fans for other bookworms!

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Are you sure you want to remove The best ghost stories of H. Russell Wakefield from your list? The best ghost stories of H. ed. by H. Published 1982 by Academy Chicago in Chicago, IL. Written in English.

August 3, 2010 History Are you sure you want to remove The best ghost stories of H.

August 3, 2010 History. Herbert Russell Wakefield. The best ghost stories of H. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove The best ghost stories of H. by Herbert Russell Wakefield. Published 1978 by J. Murray in London. English Ghost stories.

Richard Dalby - Introduction

Richard Dalby - Introduction. The Red Lodge "He Cometh And He Passeth By" Professor Pownall's Oversight "Look Up There" Blind Man's Buff Day-Dream In Macedon Damp Sheets A Black Solitude The Triumph Of Death A Kink In Space-Time The Gorge Of The Churels "Immortal Bird" Death Of A Bumble-Bee. A fourteen story collection is never going to do justice to the forty year writing career of H. Russell Wakefield, but this is certainly a great way of getting to know what he was capable of. Scandalously, this was the first Wakefield collection to be published in Britain since The Clock Strikes Twelve in 1940.

Short horror stories concern haunted houses, strange supernatural occurrences, and the appearances of ghosts
User reviews
Jan
Easily the best collection of supernatural tales I've read after M.R. James. In fact I'd go so far as to argue that some of Wakefield's tales are the equal of James's best. Sometimes Wakefield actually does better -- compare "He Cometh and He Passeth By" with James's "The Casting of the Runes," for example. Although described as "ghost" stories, not all of them concern ghosts, but then many of M.R. James's "ghost" stories aren't about ghosts either. Familiar classics such as "Blind Man's Bluff" are in here, but my personal favorite is "The Seventeenth Hole at Duncaster" (I've never played golf since). For those who prefer modern horror with extreme sex and violence, Wakefield will probably disappoint. This is in the tradition of the classic English ghost tale -- which, for this reader at least, is as good as it gets.
Wilalmaine
Victorian verbosity but a veritable volume of vicarious shivers!
Kelezel
Took quite some time to get here, but
was as described "acceptable"! Great ghost stories from
a forgotten master. IMHO As good as anything in MR James.
Kagda
In the introduction to this collection, editor Richard Dalby quotes M.R. James's reaction to Wakefield's first published anthology of ghost stories, They Return at Evening: "Mr. Wakefield," says the darling, dry Montague, "gives us a mixed bag, from which I would remove one or two that leave a nasty taste. Among the others are some admirable pieces, very inventive." Monty could just have well been referring to this volume, which groups together fourteen of Wakefield's creepy tales ranging chronologically from his first story, "The Red Lodge," to his last, "Death of a Bumblebee."

My introduction to H.R. came courtesy of the H.P. Lovecraft Literary Podcast, which featured "The Red Lodge" several months ago, and I was intrigued enough by the story to bother to hunt down this collection through interlibrary loan. The effort was certainly not wasted. While there is one confirmed stinker in the bunch (the aforementioned "Bumblebee"), the rest of the tales are at least entertaining, and a couple come close to brilliant ("Blind Man's Bluff"). In all honesty, I will admit that I would feel honor-bound to promote this book sheerly on the basis of it containing the only haunted golf course story it has ever been my pleasure to stumble across. And because Wakefield devotes not one but two stories to taking the piss out of Aleister Crowley, which just kind of makes you want to buy the man a beer.

Wakefield served in the Royal Scots Fusiliers during WWI and lived in London during the Blitz. War pervades his stories, sometimes to great effect, as when it serves to mentally disarrange his narrators just enough to make them susceptible to the supernatural, sometimes to their detriment (Have I mentioned the "Bumblebee"?). Whichever it is, Wakefield tells his tales forthrightly, with none of Lovecraft's adjectival overabundance, and only waxes ever so slightly poetic when discussing mathematics or chess. His tales are far from perfect - there's a tendency to tack awkward explanatory codas onto the end, and the tone toward women will make your eyes roll - but he manages, now and then, to evoke a sincere shiver. Admirable and inventive, indeed.