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Free eBook The Pile of Stuff at the Bottom of the Stairs download

by Christina Hopkinson

Free eBook The Pile of Stuff at the Bottom of the Stairs download ISBN: 0446573183
Author: Christina Hopkinson
Publisher: Grand Central Publishing; 1 edition (April 25, 2011)
Language: English
Pages: 352
Category: Imaginative Literature
Subcategory: Genre Fiction
Size MP3: 1258 mb
Size FLAC: 1615 mb
Rating: 4.4
Format: lrf lrf txt mobi


Christina Hopkinson's novel is a wry look at modern-day marriage, totally . Christina Hopkinson, author of the book 'The Pile Of Stuff At The Bottom Of The Stairs', tells you the top ten things that women hate.

Christina Hopkinson's novel is a wry look at modern-day marriage, totally honest, often funny and at times, alarmingly familiar. All too often it is the tiny irritations in life that make the most impact on how we are feeling; the wet towels left on the floor, the piles of loose change and crumpled tissues on the kitchen table, and yes, the pile of stuff at the bottom of the stairs. Ms Hopkinson throws in a few crude/mildly shocking moments seemingly in an attempt to get the reader re-focused. Christina Hopkinson, author of the book 'The Pile Of Stuff At The Bottom Of The Stairs', tells you the top ten things that women hate about men, reports the Daily Mail.

Christina Hopkinson25 April 2011. Sold by Grand Central Publishing.

Like this page for a chance to win a free copy of Christina Hopkinson's new book, THE PILE O. .Check out part 1 of the book trailer here, let us know what you think!

Like this page for a chance to win a free copy of Christina Hopkinson's new book, THE PILE O.Check out part 1 of the book trailer here, let us know what you think! gdata. The Pile of Stuff at the Bottom of the Stairs - Christina Hopkinson EPISODE 1. Featuring James Lance and Elizabeth Berrington from ITV's Moving Wallpaper. EPISODE 1 of the three part trailer for The Pile of Stuff at the Bottom of the Stairs by Christina Hopkinson. What's the thing you hate most about the one you love? This is the funniest, most acutely-observed novel ab. The Pile Of Stuff At The Bottom Of The Stairs.

says Joel with a kiss on the morning of my thirty-sixth birthday, as the boys bounce around us. Why, thanks. Just wait here and I’ll go and do my thing

says Joel with a kiss on the morning of my thirty-sixth birthday, as the boys bounce around us. Just wait here and I’ll go and do my thing tended session in the locked toilet. My birthday good will dissolves like a vitamin C tablet. After 20 minutes, the boys, who’ve been jumping on the bed, and I become restless and go into the bathroom. It’s a wonder you don’t asphyxiate yourself

Christina Hopkinson has wittily and very realistically tapped into the zeitgeist - literally the most relevant novel for a working mother since . Frankly, it bored me. Too many chapters with nothing but whinging and criticism. Pile of stuff? Too right.

Christina Hopkinson has wittily and very realistically tapped into the zeitgeist - literally the most relevant novel for a working mother since I Don't Know How She Does It by Allison Pearson. Plum Sykes, author of Bergdorf Blondes).

In THE PILE OF STUFF AT THE BOTTOM OF THE STAIRS, Hopkinson pens a hilarious and acutely-observed novel about marriage, motherhood, children, and work.

by Christina Hopkinson. Select Format: Hardcover. Release Date: January 1.

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. The Pilgram of Hate.

This is the set-up of Christina Hopkinson's novel. Unfortunately it is also the solitary plot point on its linear landscape

This is the set-up of Christina Hopkinson's novel. Unfortunately it is also the solitary plot point on its linear landscape. Characters don't develop, they just plod inevitability towards the horizon on which the "twist" looms large, through a narrative distinguished only by the inclusion of surely one of the most laughable pieces of survival advice ever committed to paper: "How do you tell the difference between a mushroom and a toadstool?" Answer "You just know. Like choosing a lover.

What's the thing you hate most about the one you love? Mary doesn't know whether it's the way he doesn't quite reach the laundry basket when he throws his dirty clothes at it (but doesn't ever walk over and pick them up and put them in), or the balled-up tissues he leaves on the bedside table when he has a cold, or the way he never quite empties the dishwasher, leaving the "difficult" items for her to put away. Is it that because she is "only working part-time" that she is responsible for all of the domestic tasks in the house? Or, is it simply that he puts used teabags in the sink? The mother of two young boys, Mary knows how to get them to behave the way she wants. Now she's designing the spousal equivalent of a star chart and every little thing her husband does wrong will go on it. Though Mary knows you're supposed to reward the good behavior rather than punish the bad, the rules for those in middle age are different than the rules for those not even in middle school...In THE PILE OF STUFF AT THE BOTTOM OF THE STAIRS, Hopkinson pens a hilarious and acutely-observed novel about marriage, motherhood, children, and work. Readers everywhere will find Mary's trials hilariously familiar as they cheer her on in her efforts to balance home, work, children, and a clean bottom stair!
User reviews
DEAD-SHOT
I wanted to like this book - I completely relate to the working mother's dilemma of how to do it all. But the author made the protagonist, Mary (a name that made little sense in the context of the book), almost seem like she had OCD. Mary talks on EVERY SINGLE PAGE about how annoying it is to her that her husband is a slob. Yes, that's annoying - I get it. But Mary is so consumed by it that the book starts to read like a conversation you've had with a friend a million times, the one that you manufacture a kid crisis to get off the phone to avoid. And the details - the tea bag on the counter, the socks on the floor, the multiple toys out at one time (believe me, I'm just getting started) - make this book a yawn at many points.

I wish there had been more depth here.
Nagor
I just finished reading it and I really loved it. The characters are extremely realistic and yet very touching. Most women will find similarities with their situation and their daily struggle to reach some balance between family and profesionnal's life, while maintaining also some kind of magic in the couple, despite all the very annoying habits of the partner.

To be recommended absolutely !!
Rose Of Winds
Entertaining and relevant reading!! I felt like the author was reading my mind! I would recommend this book to any woman in a longterm relationship or marriage.
Gogul
A very witty and intelligent take on daily grind and being a working mother and the dynamics of a couple with children. Highly recommended.
Tat
I suppose this was a cute story, but the main character Mary was not likable to me at all. Less then half way through I found myself saying..lighten up! I only found her friend Becky likeable , her friends were not tolerable either.
She was so angry and bitter and carried herself like she had a stick up her ass. I would love for Joel to have started a list about her instead of just adding to hers..
I only read it because it was chosen as a book club book, but thank God I got it from the library, and didn't waste money on it.
Lilegha
`The Pile of Stuff at the Bottom of the Stairs' is a book about an English family, written from the viewpoint of a mother - Mary Gilmour, of 2 small boys and a husband - Joel, she used to adore, but is now exasperated with. He ignores all the household chores around him and most of the care of his children and what he does do is looked upon, by both himself and others as amazing help. Mary previously had a good paying job and now works part time, where it also seems she is resented for that at her workplace. She is at her wits end, especially at home and decides to make a debit list for all the things her husband does wrong. If he exceeds his allotment she will divorce him.

Many, if not most readers, especially the ladies, will identify with most of the problems described.... with tissues not thrown away, sink drains not cleaned, clothes not put in the hamper, assumptions the wife will pick up children and run errands on her day "off" work.
The novel is presented as a comedy, but it comes off more as an object lesson, in many respects. As one reads, you wonder, What kind of a relationship do these two people have? Can they even attempt to talk things over and work things out? Mary doesn't even tell Joel she is making the list. Sometimes it even seems as if there is a bit of jealousy there. Everyone loves and praises Joel and Mary feels she is just expected to get on with all the dirty work.
The question also occurs, what would she expect her husband to do when he finds out she is keeping a chart judging him. Mary, at times seems self-absorbed and even at one point lets Joel brush his teeth with a toothbrush she used to clean up dog poop. We can identify with her at some instances, but then she becomes a shrew. Does she deserve to?...A reader will have to judge for themselves.

It's an entertaining, for the most part, book to read. It would make a great book club or even couples discussion subject. You want to know one secret,that is mentioned in the book ?...that proves a life long philosophy...couples that hold hands in public have the happy marriages. Read this and judge for yourself.
roternow
Here is a nagging bitter wife story. I get it, likely all married moms of toddlers get it. There's an unequal work load. Yada yada yada. I didn't need to waste my time reading the life I live. The main character is unlike able and whiny. It was hard to get through.
about a third of the way in, I thought, jeez, not another miserable marriage book (every recent library pick has been...) - but, there was just enough truth, just enough funny bits, just enough interest in the characters to soldier on - and I'm glad I did. The characters grow and change, you do grow to care about them and to root for them to succeed - or to at least find their separate ways out. Fair warning - there's a kinky sex scene involving secondary characters I'm never going to completely forget....(that's NEVER going to translate to the Big Screen!) I've had the same thoughts as Mary, I've known people like most of the characters, I just never wrote it all down. Read it all the way through - it's worth finishing.