Free eBook All for Love download

by John Dryden

Free eBook All for Love download ISBN: 1406502529
Author: John Dryden
Publisher: Dodo Press (November 16, 2005)
Language: English
Pages: 116
Category: Imaginative Literature
Subcategory: Dramas and Plays
Size MP3: 1930 mb
Size FLAC: 1483 mb
Rating: 4.3
Format: lrf rtf lrf mbr


John Dryden (1631-1700), the great representative figure in the literature of the latter part of the seventeenth century, exemplifies in his work most of the main tendencies of the time.

John Dryden (1631-1700), the great representative figure in the literature of the latter part of the seventeenth century, exemplifies in his work most of the main tendencies of the time. He came into notice with a poem on the death of Cromwell in 1658, and two years later was composing couplets expressing his loyalty to the returned king. He married Lady Elizabeth Howard, the daughter of a royalist house, and for practically all the rest of his life remained an adherent of the Tory Party.

The play All for Love by John Dryden is a subverted version of Shakespeare’s Antony and Cleopatra. He says that Antony was a brave soldier but Cleopatra has made him useless with her false love. However, in spite of having a close similarity to Shakespeare’s play, it differs to a great extent because of its themes and concerns. To fully understand the background of the play, it is recommended to read Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar which precedes its plot. Ventidius then asks about Antony and is told that he is quite depressed and does not meet anybody. He also comes to know that Antony has not eaten anything for days.

All for Love; or, the World Well Lost, is a 1677 heroic drama by John Dryden which is now his best-known and most performed play. It is a tragedy written in blank verse and is an attempt on Dryden's part to reinvigorate serious drama

All for Love; or, the World Well Lost, is a 1677 heroic drama by John Dryden which is now his best-known and most performed play. It is a tragedy written in blank verse and is an attempt on Dryden's part to reinvigorate serious drama. It is an acknowledged imitation of Shakespeare’s Antony and Cleopatra, and focuses on the last hours of the lives of its hero and heroine.

All for Love (New Mermaids) Paperback. Oh, she has decked his ruin with her love, Led him in golden bands to gaudy slaughter, And made perdition pleasing: She has left him The blank of what he was. I tell thee, eunuch, she has quite unmanned him. Can any Roman see, and know him now, Thus altered from the lord of half mankind, Unbent, unsinewed, made a woman's toy, Shrunk from the vast extent of all his honours, And crampt within a corner of the world? O Antony!

John Fairfield Dryden in the Se.

John Fairfield Dryden in the Se. Drag & drop your files (not more than 5 at once).

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All for Love - John Dryden. I doubt not but the same motive has prevailed with all of us in this attempt; I mean the excellency of the moral: For the chief persons represented were famous patterns of unlawful love; and their end accordingly was unfortunate. All reasonable men have long since concluded, that the hero of the poem ought not to be a character of perfect virtue, for then he could not, without injustice, be made unhappy; nor yet altogether wicked, because he could not then be pitied.

John Dryden’s most popular book is All for Love. Books by John Dryden. Showing 30 distinct works. previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9.

Large format for easy reading. A classic English tragedy written in blank verse, an attempt to reinvigorate serious drama after the Restoration. It is an acknowledged imitation of Shakespeare's Antony and Cleopatra, and focuses on the last hours of the lives of its hero and heroine. By the influential English poet, literary critic, and playwright, established as the leading poet and literary critic of his day.
User reviews
Thabel
While the copy I received is adequate, it is not the student edition as pictured. I am perfectly happy with the contents, but the cover does not match the rest of my collection. The cover is only a minor detail in the purchase, but still should be mentioned. The posting should be accurate.
Ramsey`s
Tasha Tudor was so unique and talented. I love that she lived what she wrote. This book is another example of her beautiful, heartfelt artistry.
Granirad
It was a gift and the person loves it. came as you said, thanks
MOQ
If Tasha Tudor's name in on the cover, there is a visual delight inside. This book is especially sweet and tender for those who find love the purest of all emotions.
Gholbirius
What can I say? Tasha Tudor books are beautiful to look at with her lovely sketches and a pleasure to read too. I love all of Tasha's books. The book put me in a magical mood. She transports me to a quiet and gentle setting. I ordered this to have by Valentine's Day but was afraid I had waited to long. It arrived in time and completed my decorations.
Corgustari
Thanks.
Aiata
very nice book and all about love, i enjoy tasha tudors books. she always includes her puppies. i also love he drawings
This is a Restoration play. There is a myth going around about the Restoration in England after the Cromwell era that pretends they were imitating the French model. First of all it is absurd because the plays, most of those who have survived, or the masques and semi-operas are very often inspired from Shakespeare or Marlowe, hence the Elizabethan period, and not at all the French models.

This here play is typical since it is a rewriting of Shakespeare's play Anthony and Cleopatra. We can maybe see in the attempt to unify the tone and genre by getting rid of any witty comic scene of any kind an influence from the classical drama in France at that time and their famous unities of place, time and subject. This version of this drama is more intensely centered on the love and friendship Antony may have experienced in his position and less on Cleopatra per se and her own world.

Cleopatra is clearly set in contrast if not opposition with Octavia, Antony's wife, but that does not really bring any more light of any type to Cleopatra. She appears as being a calculating lover who is ready to do anything to retain her Antony. Antony on the other side is shown as a rather weak man who is divided between doing what is right for Rome and being faithful to his love and at the same time to his friends. He is thus manipulated to the utmost by Cleopatra who plays the jealous competition game and by Dolabella who takes advantage of this jealous game to get Cleopatra for himself.

Then the play appears to be nothing but a long prologue to the final still life scene with Antony and Cleopatra in their regalia and political paraphernalia sitting dead on their thrones with the dead servants who have accompanied them in that fate at their feet and only Cleopatra's eunuch still alive and who will go to Rome for the Triumph of the Emperor and probably be put to death in some kind of entertaining way afterwards. What's left then after the play? Not much. Even the language of love and friendship is not that lyrical and poetical. It is rather flat. What's more it does not have the beauty of Shakespeare's verse because it is highly irregular.

That period will only flourish with music and the semi-operas of Purcell and then the operas of Handel will find some beauty and style, with long and maybe boring plays behind by Dryden or others, but we have completely forgotten those plays and we only know the music of King Arthur or The Fairy Queen. The Restoration was the time when theaters were reopened after forty years or so of closure or limitations but it was not always all that funny and did not produce great plays that have survived their period. Freedom is not always the most inspiring force.

Dr Jacques COULARDEAU