Free eBook Makers download

by Cory Doctorow

Free eBook Makers download ISBN: 0007330863
Author: Cory Doctorow
Publisher: TOR; 1st Edition edition (January 1, 2009)
Language: English
Category: Imaginative Literature
Subcategory: Contemporary
Size MP3: 1143 mb
Size FLAC: 1286 mb
Rating: 4.8
Format: txt docx doc lrf


This Cory Doctorow novel takes us to the very near future, a pretty bleak, economically depressed landscape.

This Cory Doctorow novel takes us to the very near future, a pretty bleak, economically depressed landscape.

Makers is a novel by Canadian-British science fiction author Cory Doctorow released in October 2009. It was nominated for the Prometheus Award. The book focuses on a near-future imagining of members of the maker culture, a group Doctorow characterizes as being composed of "people who hack hardware, business-models, and living arrangements to discover ways of staying alive and happy even when the economy is falling down the toilet".

Some common themes of his work include digital rights management, file sharing, and post-scarcity economics.

Cory Doctorow's Makers is a book full of ideas and possibility, which makes up for a somewhat predictable plot and flattened characters. I read this book after I had read Doctorow's Little Brother; the two have very strong similarities in plot structure. It's a serviceable - if a bit transparent - structure, but the girders and siding are definitely showing after reading both of these books. This isn't surprising - both books are idea books

For the risk-takers, the doers, the makers of things. A half-million dollar book-deal.

Makers Cory DoctorowDedication For the risk-takers, the doers, the makers of things. PART I Suzanne Church almost never had to bother with the blue blazer these days. For the risk-takers, the doers, the makers of things. PART I. Suzanne Church almost never had to bother with the blue blazer these days. If Kettlewell was right, then the exclusive book on the inside of the first year at Kodacell could easily make that advance. And the props would be mad, as the kids said.

They have no respect for property or laws. What’s more, they’re powerful and organized, and have the ears of lawmakers and the press blishers.

Makers (Cory Doctorow novel). Makers (Cory Doctorow novel). The book focuses on a near-future imagining of members of the Maker subculture, a group Doctorow characterizes as being composed of "people who hack hardware, business-models, and living arrangements to discover ways of staying alive and happy even when the economy is falling down the toilet. The UK hardcover is 416 pages long. Online Version of the book.

Author: Cory Doctorow. Publisher: Tor Books, 2009. In this tour de force, Doctorow (Little Brother) uses the contradictions of two overused SF themes-the decline and fall of America and the boundless optimism of open source/hacker culture-to draw one of the most brilliant reimaginings of the near future since cyberpunk wore out its mirror shades. Perry Gibbons and Lester Banks, typical brilliant geeks in a garage, are trash-hackers who find inspiration in the growing pile of technical junk.

From Cory Doctorow, the New York Times bestselling author of Little Brother, the repackaged trade paperback of Makers, a novel of the booms, busts, and further booms in store for America-now with a new cover!

From Cory Doctorow, the New York Times bestselling author of Little Brother, the repackaged trade paperback of Makers, a novel of the booms, busts, and further booms in store for America-now with a new cover! Perry and Lester invent things-seashell robots that make toast, Boogie Woogie Elmo dolls that drive cars.

Cory Doctorow’s Futuristic Tales Of The Here And No.

Cory Doctorow’s Futuristic Tales Of The Here And Now. About. Party Discipline, a Walkaway story (Part 4) (the final part!) December 21, 2019, Cory Doctorow, Podcast.

User reviews
Aloo
I had previously read one Cory Doctorow book: Someone Comes to Town, Someone Leaves Town. I liked that one fine, and thought it was well written, and pleasingly bizarre. At the time I had no idea who Doctorow was -- i.e., that he is a sort of internet celebrity, an activist, speaker, and insanely prolific blogger. After I learned more about this intriguing guy, I bought Makers. I found it compelling and repellant at the same time. There were times when I didn't want to finish it, but I couldn't get myself to abandon it. It's strange. A lot of the writing is terrible -- the prose and the characterization. It reads as if Doctorow plowed throught the first draft in three weeks and it was published essentially as is, with no revisions. But there are passages that are truly beautiful and insightful.

Some examples of the lazy, bad writing: one of the villains, Freddy, is ugly, lecherous, and has bad breath; the other villain is named Sammy (Freddy and Sammy. Really?), and starts of seemingly as a sort of nebbishy middle manager worried about the fact that he isn't reimbursed by his employer for mileage when traveling, then turns out to be quite high up in the Disney chain of command -- he is in charge of Fantasyland. Then he turns out to be a violent psychotic. And in the end he's sympathetic to the mission of our heroes (Perry and Lester), and just wants to make cool stuff, like they do. I guess that could be a character arc.

More lazy writing: people in this book double over laughing all the time; at one point someone literally rolls on the floor laughing. Have you ever seen an adult rolling around on the floor laughing? Maybe I live a humorless life, but I haven't.

On the other hand, the plot keeps racing along, and I felt compelled to run after it to see where it would go next. And the book is stuffed with ideas. And there are those flashes of brilliance in the writing that make me think that Doctorow could be a wonderful writer if he'd just slow down a bit.

But if you are aware of who he is and what he does, that doesn't seem likely.

Despite not being able to recommend this book, I'll read another Cory Doctorow. Probably Little Brother.
Isha
This is my third Cory Doctorow novel and I've begun to develop expectations of what he will do particularly well and what, maybe, he could do a bit better. I'll leave the crit to others: yes, the characters can seem a bit wooden and interchangeable, but these are novels of ideas, and it's in the exchange of ideas, especially when they're being shared and developed in discussion, that Doctorow really shines.
Niwield
One of my favorite sf writers ( especially since the stories do not always end well) , I picked this up as a companion to Chris Andersons recent book, Makers. . It is a terrific co read with Anderson as Doctorow is so prescient in his pictures of a 3d printer enabled makers future but he also weaves lots of tech/geek and economic content into a compelling read. You can read anyone else for character development - but no one holds up a better magnifying glass on society in general. He is right up there with William Gibson in that respect.
Celak
This Cory Doctorow novel takes us to the very near future, a pretty bleak, economically depressed landscape. Into this landscape, Doctorow drops two tech nerds (Lester and Perry), an English venture capitalist (Kettlewell), a blogger (Suzanne Church) and a mid-level Disney exec (Sammy) in a story of how unfettered high tech capitalism and bio-technology might shape the near future, a future in which many of our previous bellwether economic engines, companies such as Kodak, Duracell and Westinghouse have found themselves to be obsolete.

This is a vastly entertaining read, one in which very, very many current economic trends are followed to their potential conclusions, some good and some not so good (think airport security). The wealth of potential new inventions which Doctorow has imagined is staggering. Imagine a world in which obesity is eliminated through biochemical altering of metabolism (with the proviso that the altered individual must consume 10,000 calories a day or starve to death!). Imagine what might happen to Disney World when patrons can undergo similar or superior experiences through virtual reality in one's own home or at a fraction of the cost. Rest assured, Mickey will not go quietly into that good night. As an aside, what is it with Doctorow and Disney?

This is a story told in three parts: First, an attempted conversion of the old economy into a vibrant, creative "New Work" economy in which micro cells of technologically proficient, highly creative inventors are identified, organized and capitalized; second, 5-10 years following collapse of the "New Work" economy, our heroes (Perry and Lester) create a nostalgic look back through construction of a "ride", in which participants not only experience the contents, but grade and ultimately reconfigure it through their collective experiences. Such rides sweep the nation, and are connected and remain identical through technical networks; third, is the clash between the "rides" and the ultimate "ride", Disney World. The Empire Strikes Back, as it were. Suits, countersuits, trademark infringement, industrial espionage all ensue.

Doctorow is clearly no fan of multi-national corporations, bureaucracy, "suits" or even mid-level management. One would almost picture his Utopia as a near anarchical society in which the individual creative genius is given complete control, unfettered by law (intellectual property) or administrative control. Of course, both in real life and in Doctorow's novel, such a society is not sustainable. At each level of the story, a predictable progression of creativity, success and growth is followed by chaos, control, litigation and ultimately collapse. It's a wild "ride" and one well worth the time.
Modifyn
I won't try to explain the story here, but that's what synopses are for! This book is set in the near future, when the current economy has given way to another "post-scarcity" economy (I had to look that up). I never thought a book having so much to do with business and economics could be interesting, but I loved this one. Which speaks to Doctorow's talent. I came to care for nearly every character and woke each day looking forward to spending time with them. I finished it yesterday and was disappointed to wake today and find that our time together had ended. This'll only make sense if you've read it, but hop on The Ride and enjoy The Story!