Free eBook Tripmaster Monkey download

by Maxine Hong. Kingston

Free eBook Tripmaster Monkey download ISBN: 0330302744
Author: Maxine Hong. Kingston
Publisher: Knopf; F edition (1989)
Language: English
Pages: 352
Category: Imaginative Literature
Subcategory: Contemporary
Size MP3: 1529 mb
Size FLAC: 1945 mb
Rating: 4.8
Format: docx lrf mbr rtf


Also by maxine hong kingston. The Woman Warrior (1976).

Also by maxine hong kingston. Hawai’i One Summer (1987). Published in the United States by Vintage Books, a division of Random House, In. New York, and simultaneously in Canada by Random House of Canada Limited, Toronto. Originally published, in hardcover, by Alfred A. Knopf, In. in 1989

Maxine Hong Kingston is the author of two earlier books: The Woman Warrior-Memoirs of a. .Tripmaster Monkey-His Fake Book is her first novel

Maxine Hong Kingston is the author of two earlier books: The Woman Warrior-Memoirs of a Girlhood Among Ghosts, winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award for non-fiction, and China Men, winner of the National Book Award for non-fiction. Tripmaster Monkey-His Fake Book is her first novel. She lives in Oakland, California, and is married to Earll Kingston, an actor; they have a son, Joseph Kingston, a musician. PERMISSIONS ACKNOWLEDGMENTS. Portions of this work have been previously published in Caliban, Conjunctions, Sulfur, Witness, and ZYZZYVA.

Maxine Hong Kingston (Chinese: 湯婷婷; born Maxine Ting Ting Hong; October 27, 1940) is a Chinese American author and Professor Emerita at the University of California, Berkeley.

Maxine Hong Kingston (Chinese: 湯婷婷; born Maxine Ting Ting Hong; October 27, 1940) is a Chinese American author and Professor Emerita at the University of California, Berkeley, where she graduated with a BA in English in 1962. Kingston has written three novels and several works of non-fiction about the experiences of Chinese Americans

Maxine Hong Kingston is the daughter of Chinese immigrants who operated a gambling house in the 1940s, when Maxine was born, and then a laundry where Kingston and her brothers and sisters toiled long hours.

Maxine Hong Kingston is the daughter of Chinese immigrants who operated a gambling house in the 1940s, when Maxine was born, and then a laundry where Kingston and her brothers and sisters toiled long hours. Kingston graduated with a bachelor’s degree in 1962 from the University of California at Berkeley, and, in the same year, married actor Earll Kingston, whom she had met in an English course.

Tripmaster Monkey book.

Maxine Hong Kingston is an American Professor Emeritus at the University of California, Berkeley where she graduated with a BA in English in 1962 prolific academic and autobiographical writer. She was born as Maxine Ting Ting Hong to a laundry house owner in Stockton, California. She has written one novel, Tripmaster Monkey, a story depicting a character based on the mythical Chinese character Sun Wu Kong. Her most recent books are To Be The Poet and The Fifth Book of Peace. She was awarded the 1997 National Humanities Medal by President of the United States Bill Clinton.

Like Kingston’s earlier books, Tripmaster Monkey is constructed around a web of Chinese intertexts, from the third person narrator, identified by Kingston as Kwan Yin, the Chinese goddess of mercy, to the Chinese classical romances that serve as sources for Wittman’s extended ex- travaganza. Nevertheless, Kingston skillfully translates these Chinese intertexts into Chinese Ameri- can idioms with many allusions to Western literature, movies, and bohemian culture.

Tripmaster Monkey: His Fake Book. by Maxine Hong Kingston · Erroll McDonald. Book Jacket Status: Jacketed)Here–for the first time in one volume–are two classic, brilliantly original works on the experience of Chinese immigrants in America. In both books Maxine Hong Kingston mines her family’s past and her culture’s storie. Written by Herself: Autobiographies of American Women: An Anthology.

Maxine Hong Kingston, American writer, much of whose work is rooted in her experiences as a first-generation Chinese . China Men won the American Book Award for nonfiction.

Maxine Hong Kingston, American writer, much of whose work is rooted in her experiences as a first-generation Chinese American. Her notable books included the memoirs The Woman Warrior, China Men, and I Love a Broad Margin to My Life. Learn more about Kingston’s life and work. In Tripmaster Monkey: His Fake Book (1989), the main character-Whittman Ah Sing, named after Walt Whitman-narrates a peculiarly 20th-century American odyssey; the book combines Eastern and Western literary traditions while emphasizing the Americanness of its characters.

by Maxine Hong Kingston. In The Warrior Woman (1976) and China Men (1980), Kingston approached the genius of the Chinese-American heritage in a robust blaze of mythic intuitions and shrewd, historical, autobiographical notation. Here, in her first novel, she swirls stories from myth and wild circumstance about the Sixties' soul-journey of a recent Berkeley grad of Chinese ancestry-as he pads about the . environs on Steppenwolfian, jumpy paws, experiencing Vietnam-era Fear and Loathing, love and friendship, and the creative bangs and shudders of a poet.

User reviews
LØV€ YØỮ
Kingston's book is the embodiment of post-modern conscience. As such, her writing is fragmented and at times the plot is unintelligible, obscured by intense imagery and rhetoric. The negative response to her work is thus understandable. However, the importance of Kingston's novel lies in its intensity, in its dense language and imagery, and in its ultimate unintelligibility. The lack of superficial structure and form, and the fragmentation of characters and occurences embody the external and internalized difficulties faced by Kingston's protagonist and the diasporic community as a whole, and likewise exemplifies the problems with and responses to diasporic literature. Overall, while obscure and difficult, Kingston's novel is an important feat (both for readers who complete the novel and for Kingston).
Topmen
good
Inerrace
I feel so sorry for anyone who has to read this. Granted, it was for a classroom assignment, and for my old lion of a professor who said, "Reading literature (humph!) is not about enjoyment; reading literature is about (humph!) suffering."

Oh, this is suffering, all right.

"Tripmaster" sums this book up perfectly. This entire book READS like an LCD trip. It is so saturated by so many adjectives, unexplained Chinese culture and myth, and literary in-jokes (Ah Bartleby! Ah humanity! Quickly, where does that come from?!) that you feel as though you've just plowed into someone else's conversation by accident. Many lines don't seem to make any kind of sense at all. The prose is awkward at best, and confusing and irritating the rest of the time.

The greatest crime committed here is the characterization. I hated every single character; they were, without fail, unlikable, selfish, and pretentious. They all thought they were the most brilliant people ever born; Ms. Kingston seems to pat herself on the back every time she writes about them. They really all deserved to die. When Wittman sees a bomber in the sky I kept hoping it would accidentally release its payload upon him.

What could be a fascinating look at the 60s and Chinese culture turns out to be nothing less than literary masturbation. Every page I read, I could nearly hear Ms. Kingston saying, "Look at how much I know. My vocabulary is unparalleled! My knowledge of literature, a height untouchable! Look at how perfectly my book breaks the mold. Look at me. Look at me!"

Some difficult texts are worth poring over -- like, oh, Shakespeare, for instance. This piece of filth has no reward to offer you for your diligence. Avoid it for your sanity's sake.
Vut
It is hard to believe that "Tripmaster Monkey: His ... Book" is by the same author who wrote "The Woman Warrior." Maxine Hong Kingston's "Tripmaster Monkey" is her first "novel" (though by no means her first foray into fiction), and it is easy to see why there was a nine year gap between this book and "China Men." Kingston's novel, centring on a young, literary minded Chinese American man named Wittman Ah Sing, is meticulously researched and detailed, bringing to life the issues and fads of the mid-1960s Bay Area literary scene. Wittman, largely without an Chinese/Asian American literary tradition, has to overcome (white) racist assumptions of "the artist" in order to produce his truly American play without it being reduced to some "exotic" or "Oriental" exercise in Asianness. Despite the seriousness of Wittman's self- and community-driven mission to be taken seriously as an artist despite the racist assumptions that attempt to stifle his creativity, the novel is extremely funny, witty and surreal. Wittman disturbs a girl he is infatuated with by proclaiming "I am really: the present-day USA incarnation of the King of the Monkeys." Wittman is fired from his department store job because he puts "an organ-grinder's monkey with cymbals attached to its hands" on ..., for customers (children) to see! Wittman's parents abandon his honorary grandmother PoPo high in the Sierra Nevada Mountains to die, and she is later rescued by a wealthy man who just happens to be seeking a wife! In many ways, Kingston's rendering of the surreal, "tripmaster" (mental and physical) wanderings of Wittman resemble the textual flow of the post-"Moby Dick" novels by Herman Melville. As with those later Melville novels, Kingston's own novel is often angry, but is also frightfully funny and filled with accurate observations of life, love and the role of art, religion, philosophy and national identity in society.