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by Maryse Conde

Free eBook Who Slashed Celanire's Throat?: A Fantastical Tale download ISBN: 0743482603
Author: Maryse Conde
Publisher: Atria; 1st Atria Books Hardcover Ed edition (August 17, 2004)
Language: English
Pages: 240
Category: Imaginative Literature
Subcategory: Contemporary
Size MP3: 1837 mb
Size FLAC: 1289 mb
Rating: 4.4
Format: azw mobi lrf lrf


Who Slashed Celanire's Throat? book.

Who Slashed Celanire's Throat? book. Condé lyrically, The deeply prolific and widely celebrated author of such books as Segu and Tales from the Heart, Maryse Condé returns with an unforgettable new novel, Who Slashed Celanire's Throat? Inspired by a tragedy in the late twentieth century, Condé sets this fiction in the late nineteenth century with her characteristic blend of magical realism and fantasy. Condé lyrically, hauntingly imagines Celanire: a woman who was mutilated at birth and left for dead.

A few chapters into "Who Slashed Celanire's Throat?" things turns appreciably darker, when an important secret about her . Read this book and be transported

A few chapters into "Who Slashed Celanire's Throat?" things turns appreciably darker, when an important secret about her attack and miraculous recovery is revealed. Some readers might guess what's coming, but since it took me completely by surprise, I won't reveal this plot element. Read this book and be transported. The writer lures you into a fantastical tale, into a world that is truly beleiavable;Characters so carefully drawn you can smell them. I will be reading more of Maryse Conde.

Dil: İNGİLİZCE Kategori: ROMAN Çeviren: Richard Philcox. E-kitap hakkında daha fazla bilgi.

Who Slashed Celanire's Throat?: A Fantastical Tale (2004). Condé, Maryse, and Richard Philcox. Artist Page from the University of Minnesota. The Story of the Cannibal Woman: A Novel (2007). Like Two Brothers (play, 2007). Tales from the Heart: True Stories from My Childhood. New York: Soho, 2001. Présentation du Fonds Maryse Condé de la Médiathèque Caraïbe (laméca), ouvrages issus de la bibliothèque privée de Maryse Condé.

For Raky, who will not take the trouble to read me. Ivory Coast: 1901–1906. Unperturbed, Celanire jotted down everything she saw in a notebook. She had already used up two thick ones on board the Jean-Bart. The majority of the Sisters of Charity and those of Our Lady of the Apostles disliked this habit of keeping a diary and thought it a sin of pride.

Who Slashed Celanire's Throat?: A Fantastical Tale. The deeply prolific and widely celebrated author of such books as Segu and Tales from the Heart, Maryse Condé returns with an unforgettable new novel, Who Slashed Celanire's Throat? Inspired by a tragedy in the late twentieth century, Condé sets this fiction in the late nineteenth century with her characteristic blend of magical realism and fantasy.

This book was phenomenal! The author begins with a subtle Celanire who is yet mysterious to everyone. No one knows why there is always some type of ever present neckband/choker around her neck. Maryse Condé is the award-winning author of twelve novels, including Crossing the Mangrove, Segu, Who Slashed Celanire's Throat?, and I, Tituba: Black Witch of Salem.

Unperturbed, Celanire jotted down everything she saw in a notebook.

Who Slashed Celanire's Throat? : A Fantastical Tale. By the author of Tales from the Heart and Segu.

Based on a true story about the 1995 murder of a Guadeloupe infant, the tale of a mysterious and seductive woman follows her determined search for the truth about her past, a quest that takes her to West Africa and Peru. By the author of Tales from the Heart and Segu.
User reviews
Cesar
If there's a reason that Maryse Conde hasn't become more universally read (her earlier novel, "Crossing the Mangrove," is impeccable), it could be because she is not shy about creating a lead character many readers might, at best, feel ambivalent towards. Such a woman is Celanire, who overcomes a horrific trauma to become a seemingly fearsome priestess of dark magic, "a kaleidoscope of negative facets, . . . the `horse' of an evil spirit who had brought nothing but death, mourning, and desolation." Conde's heroine is hauntingly disturbing, but the portrayal seems conflicted (in the good sense of the word) yet indistinct (in an unsatisfactory way).

At first, Celanire seems worthy of compassion and admiration. As a child on the island of Guadeloupe in the 1880s, she is left for dead, her throat slashed. She is rescued by a doctor, taught by nuns in France, and travels to the Ivory Coast, where she arrives at an academy for illegitimate children whose director has just died; as interim director, she transforms the school into a regional beacon of hope and respect. She campaigns against female circumcision and for women's rights in general. She is bewitchingly beautiful, always covering the wound on her elegant neck with a scarf.

And yet: she is aloof towards friends and lovers alike. Those close to her fall victim to a series of tragedies: apparent suicides, violent attacks by animals, drowning, imprisonment--whatever it seems to take to get them out of her way. The academy she has so famously improved hides in plain sight a scandalous means to raise money for its boarders. It becomes clear that nothing will be allowed to impede Celanire's twin goals: to avenge her childhood attackers and to find out the identity of her parents.

A few chapters into "Who Slashed Celanire's Throat?" things turns appreciably darker, when an important secret about her attack and miraculous recovery is revealed. Some readers might guess what's coming, but since it took me completely by surprise, I won't reveal this plot element. Suffice it to say that the book adopts an almost Gothic tone, and Conde releases into her plot the magic and superstition that govern the lives of her African and Caribbean characters, with hints of human sacrifice, voodoo, demonic possession, and shape-shifting.

Undergirding this revenge story is the friction between the local populations and their colonial administrators. It's only here that Conde gets a little heavy-handed in her tone--although certainly no reader would claim that she divides her sympathies simplistically, between good and evil, black and white, women and men, natives and French. Celanire uses this tension to her advantage: "She had given a lot of thought to the reasons why relations between Africans and the French came up against a stumbling block. Because the colonizers, being men, could only think in terms of men." Through her realization that "only the women could hold colonization in check," she arrives at--and justifies--solutions that are, shall we say, unorthodox. Following the same prescription for herself, she becomes the wife of a colonial governor, an act that will lead ultimately and surprisingly to a compromised liberation.
Rindyt
Some story. I have for long considered Ms. Condé for a Nobel Prize winner in literatura, seriously. The Celanire fantasy just reinforces my opinion.
Juce
I didn't get into this story like I have with others. The narrative didn't grab my attention to make me want more. Just O.K.
Dominator
This book was phenomenal! The author begins with a subtle Celanire who is yet mysterious to everyone. No one knows why there is always some type of ever present neckband/choker around her neck. Celanire is known as an "oblate" dedicated to God and the Catholic religion but not devoted enough to be a nun. She was sent to remote African village to assist the director of an orphanage. Upon her arrival the director dies. This is only the beginning of many horrible deaths that seem to be associated with Celanire's presence. Everywhere she goes she brings good and evil. She has a presence that brings everything and everyone to an abrupt stop.

The characters in this book were simply epic. They are extremely complex and weaved together by one common thread, Celanire. The only other author that I have read that develops characters such as Maryse Conde is Edward P. Jones. They give you the history of the character upon their initial introduction and then put you right back in the present without you ever being getting lost. Very hard technique to master without losing the reader.

Beside the characters being so captivating the landscapes, animals, flowers, and architecture have you feeling like you were right in the midst of them. Seriously, I really don't know who was telling the story that never seemed to be concrete. The language was little hard at times there were a lot of French terms. This book was based on evil and revenge and how it comes full circle.
Stanober
I got this book as a gift; it looked at me from a corner for about six weeks. I finally gave in and picked it up...what a ride!

Read this book and be transported. The writer lures you into a fantastical tale, into a world that is truly beleiavable;Characters so carefully drawn you can smell them. I will be reading more of Maryse Conde.
Diab
Outstanding novel. One of the most original, riveting, well written books I have read in a long time. Had a little bit of everything in it.
Virtual
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I'm on my second reading of this book, and I agree with all the positive statements written in the editorial reviews above.

The book is "Excellent"!!