Free eBook Swordspoint download

by Ellen Kushner

Free eBook Swordspoint download ISBN: 0048233528
Author: Ellen Kushner
Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers Ltd; First Edition edition (February 24, 1987)
Language: English
Pages: 350
Category: Imaginative Literature
Subcategory: Contemporary
Size MP3: 1532 mb
Size FLAC: 1136 mb
Rating: 4.4
Format: azw mbr txt doc


Award-winning author Ellen Kushner has created a world of unforgettable characters whose political ambitions, passionate love affairs, and age-old rivalries collide with deadly results. On the treacherous streets of Riverside, a man lives and dies by the sword.

Ellen Kushner leads a team of award-winning writers, including Alaya Dawn Johnson, Malinda Lo and . Swordspoint merchandise from litographs

Ellen Kushner leads a team of award-winning writers, including Alaya Dawn Johnson, Malinda Lo and Joel Derfner in a sexy, subversive prequel to her classic book Swordspoint. If you’ve visited the world of Swordspoint before, you’ll be delighted to return; if it’s your first time, you’ll be welcomed in style. Swordspoint merchandise from litographs. Now you can get the complete text of Ellen’s classic Swordspoint as a T-shirt, tote bag, poster, a scarf - even pillows and blankets! Comes in multiple vibrant colors and styles. Ellen narrates her riverside series for neil gaiman presents.

Swordspoint, by Ellen Kushner, is a witty and unabashedly queer caper of a book. It is a quirky, quick thing full of precise violence and political intrigue written in a silvery voice. The book is low fantasy-set in a world that has never quite existed, but one which is thoroughly mundane and historically rooted; no magic or elves here, folks. Swordspoint has a deft hand in its treatment of both class and sexuality. The story moves repeatedly from high to low, up to the nobleman's Hill and back down to Riverside. The realities and limitations of life in both cases are clearly drawn, and as the book goes on Kushner slowly reveals the deeply symbiotic relationship between the two classes.

This book is not entirely sober.

Award-winning author Ellen Kushner has created a world of unforgettable characters whose political ambitions, passionate love affairs, and age-old rivalries collide with deadly results. Even the nobles on the Hill turn to duels to settle their disputes. This book is not entirely sober. It has beauty, elegance and wit, but also a tendency to meander, random mumbling, slight incoherence, confusion, insights that aren't that insightful and a lot of people lacking relationship skills.

Books & Literature. Fandoms: Swordspoint Series - Ellen Kushner. Teen And Up Audiences. No Archive Warnings Apply. Cartoons & Comics & Graphic Novels. Celebrities & Real People.

Author Ellen Kushner. Books by Ellen Kushner: Swordpoint. 10 5.

Электронная книга "Swordspoint", Ellen Kushner of elegant writing and scintillating wit. Award-winning author Ellen Kushner has created a world of unforgettable characters whose political ambitions, passionate love affairs.

Электронная книга "Swordspoint", Ellen Kushner. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Swordspoint" для чтения в офлайн-режиме. of elegant writing and scintillating wit. Award-winning author Ellen Kushner has created a world of unforgettable characters whose political ambitions, passionate love affairs, and age-old rivalries collide with deadly results.

03. The Privilege of the Sword (June 2006): Welcome to Riverside, where the aristocratic and the ambitious battle for power in the city's ballroom, brothels and boudoirs.

01. Swordspoint (November 1987): From the World Fantasy Award-winning author of Thomas the Rhymer comes a witty and swashbuckling tale of swords and high society. Ellen Kushner builds fantasy out of history and romance out of medieval detail, creating an unforgettable tale of adventure, romance, and danger. 03. Into this alluring world walks Katherine, a well-bred country girl versed in the rules of conventional society. Her mistake is thinking that they apply.

Ellen Kushner (born October 6, 1955) is an American writer of fantasy novels. From 1996 until 2010, she was the host of the radio program Sound & Spirit, produced by WGBH in Boston and distributed by Public Radio International

Ellen Kushner (born October 6, 1955) is an American writer of fantasy novels. From 1996 until 2010, she was the host of the radio program Sound & Spirit, produced by WGBH in Boston and distributed by Public Radio International. Kushner was born in Washington, . and grew up in Cleveland, Ohio. She attended Bryn Mawr College and graduated from Barnard College. She lives in New York City with her wife and sometime collaborator, Delia Sherman

Swordspoint On the treacherous streets of Riverside, a man lives and dies by the sword. Even the nobles on the Hill turn to duels to settle their disputes. Within this elite, dangerous world, Richard St. Vier is the undisputed master, as skilled as he is ruthless - until a death by the sword is met with outrage instead of awe, and the city discovers that the line between hero and villain can be altered in the blink of an eye.The classic forerunner to The Fall of the Kings now with three bonus stories. Hailed by critics as a bravura performance (Locus) and witty, sharp-eyed, [and] full of interesting people (Newsday), this classic melodrama of manners, filled with remarkable plot twists and unexpected humor, takes fantasy to an unprecedented level of elegant writing and scintillating wit. Award-winning author Ellen Kushner has created a world of unforgettable characters whose political ambitions, passionate love affairs, and age-old rivalries collide with deadly results.
User reviews
Akinozuru
I almost took a star off, as I felt the world building was limited: Kushner concentrates on one city, its nobility, and its lower class. There isn't even a middle class, and the countryside gets mentioned maybe twice. There is no army. We're never told if there are other countries in this world.

The prose, though, is drop-dead gorgeous, and the plot is fascinating, built around the nobility's tradition of hiring killers (swordsmen) to decide questions of honor and power. If kept within the rules, such things are legitimate. The swordsman will "challenge" the noble's enemy, always another noble. That noble then calls one of his own swordsman to take up the challenge, and the swordsmen duel, either to first blood, or to death. If the swordsman manages to challenge a noble where he can't call on his own swordsmen, then the noble himself must duel or lose his honor, providing a convenient and legal means of assassination.

These games involve our heroes: Richard, the emotionally frozen, calm, pleasant killer, the best swordsman of them all, and Alec, his suicidal, bloodthirsty beloved. Richard must watch Alec like a hawk, as he never knows when Alec might try to cut himself, overdose on drugs, or toss himself into a fireplace. Alec's nightly pastime is to annoy someone into attacking him, as his considerate lover will then step in and kill the annoyance for him. Watching Richard kill makes Alec horny, and that, of course, makes Richard happy. It's the perfect relationship, built around death, bloodshed, self destruction, excellent sex, and what seems like genuine affection. That Kushner also makes this relationship romantic and sweet, and fits it perfectly into the complex plotting of the nobility make this a truly unique novel.
Uleran
Swordspoint is very much my cup of tea! It’s a witty, irony-laden good time that reads as if Dangerous Liaisons had been written by Jane Austen. I love Fantasy of Manners as a subgenre, and as far as I know, this is one of the earliest examples (I understand Kushner coined the term, even). There are debonair sword fighters, ruthless aristocrats and subterfuge galore. All this set in a fictional society known as Riverside, which is not unlike 18th Century England. I absolutely adore political intrigue so for me this scratched a lot of the right itches, however it’s low on action and it’s an extremely feminine novel so this isn’t going to work for everyone. If you’re looking for Grimdark, turn on your heel and look elsewhere. Those who aren’t fans of the classics might find the pacing and the lack of fantasy elements difficult to get to grips with. Indeed, it’s an outside-the-box sort of fantasy novel in that there is no magic, no fantastic creatures – very little that people have come to expect from this genre. However, the fictional setting and culture kept me gripped, along with some beautifully evocative prose. I found myself reminded of Jane Austen’s own description of Pride & Prejudice: “light and bright and sparkling”.

I listened to the audiobook for much of the novel and I would highly recommend going this route – Kushner herself provides the narration, with a voice cast, music, and special effects. It’s absolutely sublime, for me everything clicked wonderfully and added to the atmosphere without being intrusive, though your mileage may vary as I have spoken to at least one person who found it distracting. The voice actors are excellent and the amusement in Kushner’s voice sets the tone perfectly.

The plot, while not action packed (though there are some excellent swordfights), provides plenty of twists due to the cunning schemes of its characters, leading to a climactic courtroom scene that put me in mind of The Merchant of Venice with its sheer cleverness. There’s romance, a femme fatale for the ages, and a fluid and delicious approach to sexuality that is far ahead of its time given that the novel was published in ’87. It is a book that will no doubt be divisive for some, but for me it was a joy. I’m thrilled to have been reunited with this author, and I’ll be picking up the rest of this series for sure.
Wild Python
Swordspoint, by Ellen Kushner, is a witty and unabashedly queer caper of a book. It is a quirky, quick thing full of precise violence and political intrigue written in a silvery voice. The book is low fantasy--set in a world that has never quite existed, but one which is thoroughly mundane and historically rooted; no magic or elves here, folks. The story follows Richard St. Vier, a half-crazy and meticulously genius swordsman for hire, his mysterious lover Alec, and the naive nobleman Michael Godwin as the three get swept into the subterfuge and deadly political games of the ruling class. There is honor in the book--it's shot through with honor--but there's no morality. Or what morality exists is aggressively gray. This is a book with no clear villains, just selfish people and ambitious people and callous people. It's a book populated by very real people. This is a book that has some tricks up its sleeve: wonderful turns of phrase, pointed social commentary, and it's a book packed to the brim with plot and plot twists.

Swordspoint has a deft hand in its treatment of both class and sexuality. The story moves repeatedly from high to low, up to the nobleman's Hill and back down to Riverside. The realities and limitations of life in both cases are clearly drawn, and as the book goes on Kushner slowly reveals the deeply symbiotic relationship between the two classes. Richard St. Vier is the embodiment of this: a poor man living a poor man's life who plays a vital role in the nobles' politicking. Richard's role manifests again in his relationship with his lover Alec, a clearly high bred man playing pauper who roams around Riverside starting fights Richard must finish for him. Sexuality is dealt with in a simple and wonderfully frank way; it's refreshing to read a book where non-hetero relationships are written about as easily and with as much normalcy as straight ones. Again, there's a classed element to this: the sexual liaisons up on the Hill are just another form of secretive political alliance, whereas everyone in Riverside knows everyone else's business and no one particularly cares much.

The writing itself flows like wine. Kushner has a smooth, rarefied voice. She is a master of imagery, knowing exactly which details to include to make a picture crystal clear. All of her writing is seamless, and it all works even when, by rights, it shouldn't. A case in point is Kushner's tendency to head-hop, jumping from one POV character to another with no warning within the same scene. Usually this irks the living shit out of me. Usually I find it jarring and it rips me out of the narrative. For some reason (and I don't know why the particular alchemy of her writing makes this work) it was no problem at all for me in Swordspoint . There's a kind of force to Kushner's writing, and a kind of tricky truth, that keeps the book from being the overwritten confusing mess it could have been in another writer's hands. My hands, for instance, could not have produced something in this style that was remotely coherent or pleasant to read.

Swordspoint is extremely good, but it's not perfect. While the book passes the Bechdel test it's still very much a masculine book. The honor at play is masculine honor--even when manipulated by the beautiful and calculating Duchess Tremontaine it's masculine honor at stake. We see hints of feminine agency in Riverside, but the book doesn't dwell on them. This is a masculine book, and the queer elements at play here are masculine queer experiences. We see many men pursuing and loving and getting rebuffed by other men, and presumably that sexual openness extends to lesbian relationships, too, but we see exactly none of that in this book.

The prodigious plot of the book could have been tighter. Specifically, the thread of Michael Godwin feels very much unresolved by the end of the novel. His prominence in the story and the ambiguous place he is left when we last encounter him makes him feel like a more important character than he turns out to be. It feels, a bit, like Kushner loved the character and wanted him in the book, but really his story only crosses the main narrative arc in one or two places. He's not actually vital to the narrative. It may be that he plays a bigger part in the subsequent books in the series, I don't know, but in this book his subplot is strangely disconnected and unresolved.