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Free eBook Siegfried: The Nazis Last Stand download

by Charles Whiting

Free eBook Siegfried: The Nazis Last Stand download ISBN: 0515073938
Author: Charles Whiting
Publisher: Jove; Reprint edition (December 1, 1983)
Language: English
Category: Imaginative Literature
Subcategory: Contemporary
Size MP3: 1385 mb
Size FLAC: 1702 mb
Rating: 4.3
Format: lrf lrf lit mbr


Библиографические данные. Siegfried: The Nazis' Last Stand.

On September 11, 1944, four American soldiers from the Fifth Armored Division crossed the river Our and entered Hitler's Third Reich - the first hostile forces to penetrate German lines since the days of Napoleon. Charles Whiting is the author of several books on World War II. He lives in York, England. Библиографические данные. Издание: иллюстрированное, перепечатанное.

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Siegfried: The Nazi's Last Stand is about the final attacks by British and American forces on Hitler's West Wall at. .Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 22 years ago. This book is written in Charles Whiting's usual exciting style and is good for a "one session" read

Siegfried: The Nazi's Last Stand is about the final attacks by British and American forces on Hitler's West Wall at the close of WWII. The author, Charles Whiting is a good writer who gives vivid descriptions of the battlefield and plenty of personal anecdotes. This book is written in Charles Whiting's usual exciting style and is good for a "one session" read. It describes just what a hard slog the allies faced in the closing months of the war, despite the prevalent (incorrect) view that after D Day it was a simple drive through France and into Germany.

Title : Siegfried: The Nazi's Last Stand. Authors : Whiting, Charles. Books, Comics & Magazines Other Fiction Books Other Non-Fiction Books Childrens & Young Adult Books General Fiction Books Children's Fiction Books. Read full description.

Items related to Siegfried: The Nazis' Last Stand . An important book that records one of the most difficult yet least publicised phases of the war. Charles Whiting Siegfried: The Nazis' Last Stand. ISBN 13: 9780815411666. (The Spectator).

The book has been rather badly received in some Russian quarters, because-at least in the captured cities, where officers could keep . The Nazis had forbidden anyone to retreat from eastern Germany.

The Nazis had forbidden anyone to retreat from eastern Germany.

335 pages, pages of plates : 18 cm. Originally published: London : Leo Cooper, 1983.

Slight Creasing To Spine and Wear To Edges Of Pages Title: Siegfried: The Nazis' Last Stand (A Leo Cooper book) Item Condition: used item in a good condition. Author: Charles Whiting ISBN 10: 0436570939. Will be clean, not soiled or stained.

Siegfried: The Nazi's Last Stand. He saw active service in the Second World War, serving in an armoured reconnaissance regiment attached to both the . He is therefore able to write with the insight and authority of someone who, as a combat soldier, actually experienced the horrors of World War II.

war novel
User reviews
Kefym
How could anyone know anything about war and still be in favor of it? Mr. Whiting clearly describes the almost impossibility of regular troops (plus engineers) assaulting fortifications of the Siegfried line protected by mine fields, pillboxes with crossing machine gun fire. Up hill. In freezing weather. While starving. And against areas that were known to be the strongest (designed with Teutonic thoroughness to kill anyone trying to take it). They were ordered to do this by generals like Patton who would rather drink in Paris at the time real soldiers were dying. He hated Jews, and loved wars he had little risk in (other than an occasional show off stunt). His main goal seems to be the first to cross the Rhine, to augment his historical vanity.

This book is marred by lack of editing and the authors strange use of verbs. Also, no maps. Still, it is an important introduction to battle of the bulge and the bravery of average soldiers and most importantly the stupidity of war in general. And generals in war.

I've bicycled through this area from time to time over the last 40 years. The fortifications are being blown up or overgrown. And forgotten...this is a mistake.
Arashilkis
A very good book on a interesting and not so well known subject. For most of people the Allied campaign in Europe means Normandy, Battle of the Bulge and then a victorious march in Germany. This book reveals a less know and darker side of that campaign, the bloody struggle along the Siegfried line. It is well written and the personal experience of the authors plays a major role in this; the narrative is coming from someone who had known the mud, the cold and the enemy fire and not from academics studies from behind a desk. The author took a glimpse at the top Allied commanders and how their personal characters and game of vanity played in this campaign, beyond the regular glorification... In conclusion a good read, it may be not the reference book for the history buffs (with the dates, numbers and all paraphernalia) and but it provides an good overview picture, supported by a lot of individual testimonies and based on personal experience.
Wat!?
The book is a worthwhile read as it tells a story completely overshadowed by The Battle of the Bulge. The author would have done well to include maps for the various locations. Some are readily found on various Siegfried line web sites but many do not name the same villages which this books centers key events upon and so following progress is tedious. All the more so as the author cycles through battle sites to maintain the timeline across all fronts and geography gets jumbled.
Moswyn
Powerful story of the Allied advance into Germany in 1945. I recommend this book as the author knows of what he writes. Great history and well-written book.
Haracetys
It is interesting
Cemav
new item
Xarcondre
D-Day was the beginning of the end for Hitler, initiating a two-front war he couldn't win. Nazi Germany still had a fallback, though, a barrier of concrete and metal called the Siegfried Line. There American, British, and other Western forces would be slowed to a bloody crawl. Charles Whiting tells the story of the Wall and the seven-month battle to seize it in this 1982 history.

Ironically, given the toll it would inflict, the Siegfried Line had a history of being sneered at. In the early days of the war, a popular British ditty boasted about hanging out laundry on the Siegfried Line someday soon. Later on, U. S. General George Patton envisioned going through it like excrement through a goose. The Germans were exhausted and defeated, but Whiting lays out just how Allied strategists underestimated the challenge of a breakthough.

"It made no difference whether they knew anything about infantry tactics or not," one American officer said of the old men and boys he fought. "All they had to do was sit inside the thick concrete bunkers and pull the trigger of a machine gun."

Whiting's book is slow-going for a while, a reflection of a static campaign clogged by muddy thinking. An often withering critic of Eisenhower and Omar Bradley, he is at his best analyzing the poor command decisions of the Allies and the smart flexibility employed by the German defenders. U. S. troops had chased the Germans across France with alacrity, but when they hit the Wall, they hit a wall, and even with some brave help from the British, it wasn't until after the Battle of the Bulge and the arrival of General Patton, who had been preoccupied with Metz to the south, that some real strides were taken.

Whiting's writing style is sometimes turgid. Mist winds its way through the trees of a forest "like a skinny Siamese cat." Night descends upon a village "like the shadow of a giant crow." He seems to rely on other histories for much (not all) of his information, which he duly credits but which gives "Siegfried" a second-hand feeling, like when he spends a great deal of several chapters channeling Ernest Hemingway's biographer. (Hemingway was around for some of the early fighting, casually eating and drinking while under fire.) The pattern of attack and repulse from September to December, 1944 is brutally rendered, but when the same story repeats again and again, it gets exhausting.

Once the Bulge was over, new tactics and fresher troops combined with German weariness led to better results, but it was still a tough slog. Here the book picks up as Patton, Montgomery, and a lot of fresh troops enter the scene. There are river assaults, enveloping attacks, and a sense of time running out as Berlin is poised to fall to the Russians. All this Whiting captures quite well, but you have to get through 100-plus pages of less interesting material to get to the exciting part.

For those who wonder about World War II in the West after D-Day, beyond the Battle of the Bulge and that Bridge Too Far, "Siegfried" provides useful service. It could have been a better read, but it tells a tough story capably.
"From the Great Wall of China to the Maginot Line, nothing... anywhere... ever has been successfully defended." So says General Patton, quoted on pg. 174 of the paperback of this highly readable account of WWII. Siegfried: The Nazi's Last Stand is about the final attacks by British and American forces on Hitler's West Wall at the close of WWII. The author, Charles Whiting is a good writer who gives vivid descriptions of the battlefield and plenty of personal anecdotes. You can get a real sense of the danger and frustrations allied forces faced as they tackled pillboxes and other fortifications again and again. As previous reviewers have mentioned, it is more of a story than a scholarly manuscript, but of course that is the purpose of popular military history! Furthermore, there are plenty of footnotes and references at the end, so the criticism does not really hit home. There are some organizational problems and perhaps a lack of really good photos for today's visual culture, but these too are minor quibbles. Simply put, I thought this was a pretty decent read.