» » Lenny Bruce Is Dead: A Novel

Free eBook Lenny Bruce Is Dead: A Novel download

by Jonathan Goldstein

Free eBook Lenny Bruce Is Dead: A Novel download ISBN: 158243347X
Author: Jonathan Goldstein
Publisher: Counterpoint (February 21, 2006)
Language: English
Pages: 200
Category: Imaginative Literature
Subcategory: Contemporary
Size MP3: 1176 mb
Size FLAC: 1624 mb
Rating: 4.5
Format: rtf lrf txt azw


Lenny Bruce Is Dead: A N. .has been added to your Cart. Jonathan Goldstein is a master of analogies. And it's this mastery that is heavily relied upon through the sincere, meandering, disconnected passing titled Lenny Bruce is Dead

Lenny Bruce Is Dead: A N. And it's this mastery that is heavily relied upon through the sincere, meandering, disconnected passing titled Lenny Bruce is Dead. Pros: +The prose used in the book is unique in that instead of a standard narration the reader is exposed to a series of achronological moments that loosely tie together a character study of the main character, Josh and his close friends and family. For as many faults that characterize Josh, his depiction is honest and he is ultimately likeable as the epitome of a man child.

In 2001, Goldstein's debut novel, Lenny Bruce Is Dead, was published by Coach House Books

In 2001, Goldstein's debut novel, Lenny Bruce Is Dead, was published by Coach House Books. Goldstein has also been published in The New York Times Magazine, Saturday Night, The New York Times, The Walrus, GQ, the Journey Prize Anthology and the National Post.

Lenny Bruce is Dead is the first book by author and radio presenter Jonathan Goldstein. The story follows a lead character, Josh, through various events in his life, including a death in the family and his exploration of sexuality. The novel includes multiple themes, such as love, faith, a dysfunctional family, and wavering faith.

Lenny Bruce is Dead book. Lenny Bruce is Dead isn't so much a novel as a collection of anecdotes and one-liners from the narrator's life. He spends a lot of time talking about masturbating and fantasizing about his girlfriends. It's very funny while exposing how lost and lonely Josh (the narrator) is after his mother dies.

Jonathan Goldstein, where have you been all my life! Not only did I find myself laughing my head off over the sexual antics of the main character, Josh, but his touching interactions with his widowed father brought a few tears to my eyes as well. Truly unlike anything I've ever read. This year's top sellers.

Jonathan Goldstein is an American-Canadian author, humourist and radio . Brooklyn, New York City, United States of America. Lenny Bruce Is Dead: A Novel.

Jonathan Goldstein is an American-Canadian author, humourist and radio producer. Goldstein is known for his work on the radio programs This American Life and WireTap. After graduation, Goldstein supported himself by working in the telemarketing industry for ten years, all the while continuing to write and attend readings. In 2000, Goldstein"s nascent career got a boost after he was selected to work on Ira Glass" popular radio program This American Life and he relocated to Chicago to work as a producer on the show. Presents a wry and comical snapshot of the mind of Josh

We’re dedicated to reader privacy so we never track you.

Reading Lenny Bruce is Dead is like channel surfing through a movie that occasionally, and terrifyingly, reminds you of your own life in shocking and embarrassing ways. Goldstein’s style is both guileless and visceral, with a humour and delicacy that reads like the sort of poetry you hesitate to call poetry because poetry doesn’t usually have so much ejaculation in it. It is the seamless contrast between the obscene and the transcendent that gives the writing its profound power.

So begins Jonathan Goldstein's first novel, Lenny Bruce is Dead. Lenny Bruce is Dead - Jonathan Goldstein. It's the story of Joshua, a young man who's uncertain about a lot more than the possible loss of his wallet. He might as well be talking about his whole life. Lenny Bruce Is Dead walks a tightrope between being searingly funny and poignant - you'll laugh, you'll cry, you'll long for Love Lotion (and a Moschiach of your own).

Find nearly any book by Jonathan Goldstein. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. Maccabees II. by Jonathan Goldstein.

Presents a wry and comical snapshot of the mind of Josh, a rather confused young man who must cope with his father's listlessness, his own overwhelming lust, and the arrival of the Moschiach, inventor of the infamous Love Lotion. Original.
User reviews
Fearlessrunner
Jonathan Goldstein is a master of analogies. And it's this mastery that is heavily relied upon through the sincere, meandering, disconnected passing titled Lenny Bruce is Dead.

Pros:

+The prose used in the book is unique in that instead of a standard narration the reader is exposed to a series of achronological moments that loosely tie together a character study of the main character, Josh and his close friends and family.

+For as many faults that characterize Josh, his depiction is honest and he is ultimately likeable as the epitome of a man child. Josh's world is small but deep and he's willing to explore and discover what's within his limits even if he chooses not to expand them. In any other story, Josh would be the down and out best friend of a more handsome, more able protagonist. It's interesting to see life from this perspective, and due to this alone, I can recommend this as a read.

Cons:

-The constant jumps throughout the book become tiresome near the end.

-The distinct lack of clarity the beginning of the book makes it difficult to distinguish characters.

-Goldstein spends too much time in this book reinforcing certain tones or themes that only extend the length of the book and ultimately have little pay off. After the 3rd girlfriend storyline, the 4th disclosure about masturbation, 5th rumor concerning the Moshiach, everything starts to feel like padding, as if J.G. was concerned about publishing a novel that had less than 100 pages, and so he increased the font size, increased the number of chapters (that would have to start on new pages), separated each vinette with a blank lines, and then went about added a series of tangential asides to his book.

Overall, I liked the book but would have been happier with a more tightly edited version that didn't allow this interesting premise to overstay it's welcome.
Helldor
This was my first foray into the mind of Jonathan Goldstein. The book had its moments. In fact, I they were hilarious moments. I was lmao on the subway, but at other times it was frustrating. I would recommend, but know that this may not be your cup of tea. There are some really slow sections of the book. Also, the book has nothing to do with Lenny Bruce.
Alexandra
I was looking for signs of a culture of tiny tomb toys when I founf this book at the library. I have my own agenda. When I was in high school, I wanted to take a class in Modern Problems, but I was given Family Living because American social science was afraid I would miss the meaning of life by absorbing too much entertainment. The author is the product of mixed cultures that keeps mixing.
Winotterin
I'm a huge fan of everything I've heard of Goldstein's on This American Life and WireTap and the concepts of his other books, which I have not yet read, and had high hopes for LBID. However, I simply didn't get it.

I didn't laugh once and I didn't really enjoy reading this book. I feel like I'm missing some piece of context that a lot of people have; maybe it just isn't for me.

I am getting ready to read his other books, which I still expect to love.
Ballazan
Interesting, experimental novel by one of my favorite "This American Life" essayists. Folks familiar with that show will recognize the storytelling style: three- or four-sentence paragraph/chapters, each presenting a new idea, are bounced off each other in very rapid succession. The effect is sometimes ironic, sometimes not. Unfortunately, this device may be better suited to radio than it is to the page, and while there are some powerful moments the book comes off as more of a gimmicky exercise than anything else. The relentless cleverness (although the writing isn't terribly funny) make the book seem pretty far removed from actual human experience. It's also bogged down by an undergraduate sensibility about sex, and by a lot of odd metaphors that don't go anywhere. I can imagine this style being successfully applied to the novel form, but I don't think Goldstein's done it here.
Mikarr
This novel was sent across the continent to me by my best friend, and it's a perfect example of why we get along so well.

Like Denis Johnson's Jesus' Son, Barry Hannah's Geronimo Rex and very few others, the protagonist here is a solitary, emotional boy who can't express his emotions outwardly.

His voice is one that moves from narrative to something like poetry without interrupting the feel and flow of the story. Every girl he falls for is guaranteed to be a disaster, but he let's it happen anyway, and you'll fall for them too.

I'm not jewish and not from the north, but i felt every word of his mangled thoughts like they were my very own.

A STUNNING first novel for Goldstein. I can't WAIT for another!!
Braswyn
I picked it up this book because my friends were raving about it and I had heard Goldstein's hilarious radio pieces on This American Life. The narrative voice makes this novel so original and distinct. Goldstein's imagery made me stop reading at times and just think about the power of language. He is a very talented man. He notices everything so tenderly, from a dirty napkin on a table to a girl's funny face. This is an introspective novel about the reflections a man has when his mother dies. It is fragmented, but it almost has to be. It's so beautiful, I could only take it one paragraph at a time. For those who love literature only!