Free eBook Fay download

by Larry Brown

Free eBook Fay download ISBN: 0552999172
Author: Larry Brown
Publisher: Black Swan (2001)
Language: English
Pages: 560
Category: Imaginative Literature
Subcategory: Contemporary
Size MP3: 1539 mb
Size FLAC: 1491 mb
Rating: 4.8
Format: doc lit rtf txt


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Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. She's had no education, hardly any shelter, and you can't call what her father's been trying to give her since she grew up "love. So, at the ripe age of seventeen, Fay Jones leaves home. She lights out alone, wearing her only dress and rotting sneakers, carrying a purse with a half pack of cigarettes and two dollar bills. Even in 1985 Mississippi, two dollars won't go far on the road. She's headed for the bright lights and big times and even she knows she needs help getting there. But help's not hard to come by when you look like Fay.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. She's had no education, and you can't call what her father's been trying to give her love.

Fay : a novel, by Larry Brown-1st e. For my uncle in all ways but blood: Harry Crews. fay. BOOK 1. SHE CAME DOWN out of the hills that were growing black with night, and in the dusty road her feet found small broken stones that made her wince.

Fay : a novel, by Larry Brown-1st ed. p. cm. ISBN 1-56512-168-6. Alone for the first time in the world and full dark coming quickly.

Larry Brown's highly praised novel Dirty Work established him as one of the fiercest and most powerful new voices in. .

Larry Brown's highly praised novel Dirty Work established him as one of the fiercest and most powerful new voices in Southern literature, a writer who understands the sorrows and joys of everyday life. That same compassionate regard for ordinary people shines on every page of Big Bad Love, whose heroes in these stories have a fatal weakness for beer, fast women, and pick-up trucks, and who find a kind of salvation in the reckless pursuit of love. On Fire, his first work of nonfiction, looks back on his life as a full-time firefighter.

Larry Brown was born in Lafayette County, Mississippi, where he lived all his life. At the age of thirty, a captain in the Oxford Fire Department, he decided to become a writer and worked toward that goal for seven years before publishing his first book, Facing the Music, a collection of stories, in 1988. Between then and his untimely death in 2004, he published seven more books. His three grown children and his widow, Mary Annie Brown, live near Oxford.

Fay, his most accomplished novel to date, was darker, but one could identify with the protagonist.

This is the work of a writer unafraid to gaze directly at characters challenged by crisis and pathology. Larry Brown has been a force in American literature since taking critics by storm with his debut collection, Facing the Music, in 1988. His subsequent work-five novels, another story collection, and two books of to bring extraordinary praise and national attention to the writer New York Newsday called a "master. Fay, his most accomplished novel to date, was darker, but one could identify with the protagonist.

33 quotes from Larry Brown: 'After a year of therapy, my psychiatrist said to me, "Maybe life isn't for everyone. 'I can understand why people jump off bridges. and 'I only had one life, and I'd be damned if I'd live it in a way that would make me unhappy and please somebody else. I had already lived that kind of life, too much of it already.

Larry Brown eBook Online Read. Published Year: 2000 History & Fiction. Published Year: 2001 History & Fiction. Joe. Author: Larry Brown. Published Year: 2003 History & Fiction. Published Year: 1990 History & Fiction. Published Year: 1992 History & Fiction. Published Year: 1989 History & Fiction. Published Year: 1987 History & Fiction.

Read Fay, by Larry Brown online on Bookmate – She's had no education, hardly any shelter, and you can't call what her father's been trying to give her since she grew up love. So, at the ripe age o. She's had no education, hardly any shelter, and you can't call what her father's been trying to give her since she grew up love.

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User reviews
Gtonydne
If you read the novel Joe by Larry Brown you know that Gary Jones had two sisters and the older of the two of them left. Living in what can only be described as the most horrific conditions imaginable, she just got up and walked away. Walked away from her family and from the story. Joe was about Gary Jones and Joe Ransom, so the girl's story was left untold. The reader was left wondering about this glaring loose thread. What happened to the girl? She was just gone.

Fay, also by Larry Brown, tells the story of that girl, and what an amazing story it is. Picture a beautiful, innocent, uneducated girl with no experience in the world that normal people live in just walking down the dusty country roads of rural Mississippi with only a couple of dollars to her name and completely unaware of the dangers lurking in the shadows. That is where the story of Fay begins.

This being a Larry Brown novel you know that you are in store for a long, unrelenting dose of noir. Things just aren't going to go well. And by the time all the pieces are in place, you find yourself caring more for these characters than you thought you would.

I'm not going to give away the plot. Just know that it's a joy to read. I'll turn back to this one in the future. By far my favorite by Larry Brown.
Garr
Larry Brown, as is always the case with this author, will grab you by the seat of your pants from start to finish and you won't want him to let go. Yes, it is a long book, maybe a bit too lengthy, but it is hard to put down and Brown insists on getting his point across...which is make his fictional characters seem real in a life that is made up mainly of drinking, smoking, cruising around and sex, and then more of the same. Could it be any different with the characters that populate his writing? That is a question that readers will try to answer throughout the book. If you are into moralism, don't bother with this novel...Brown doesn't want your opinion - he wants to tell it like it was in Mississippi (and many other places in the '70s-'80s, and not with much has changed in today's world) and he does so. Will the reader sympathize with Fay and the other figures (men & women left in her wake) in his story? I again don't think Larry Brown would give a hoot, but he will leave you thinking about the America we live in, like it or not.
Naktilar
I discovered Larry Brown a few months ago and I've since devoured through all of his books. If pressed, I'd say "Joe" was my favorite, but they're all Five Star books in my opinion. Of all of his books, though, I'd say this was the hardest for me to read. In the sense that it's so damn honest it can be heartbreaking at times. The main character, Fay, who was a minor character at best in "Joe", starts out on the right foot. Leaving her dismal family behind, and soon finding a home with a terribly kind, but equally flawed Highway Patrol officer and his wife. You can't help feeling overjoyed for this girl who's never owned anything new or nice in her whole life, suddenly living the Life of Riley in a house by the lake. Then the bottom drops out. Fay hits the road again, but this time reality sets in. And it's hard times ahead for Fay...I had to keep putting this book down, as it truly did depress me at times. Not in a bad way, though. It's a reminder that life, for most of us, seldom turns out the way we want it to. If that kind of reality isn't something you want to be reminded of when you read a book, then look elsewhere, my friend. But for those of you brave enough to take off the rose tinted glasses, if just for a little while, then you'll be rewarded with a fine piece of literature.
Dorilune
I can't help but laugh at the negative critics who complain about the lack of "redemption" or "redemptive characters" in this and in Larry Brown's other books. This is tragedy, folks. Remember Hamlet? How about __East of Eden__?

__Fay__ is hard core tragic realism. Of course, we don't like Fay. But look where she came from: a migrant family of dirt farmers with an abusive, alcoholic father. (Read __Joe__ for the background). What do readers expect her to do with her life? Find Jesus? I wish she had done so, but again------realism!

Fay; the state trooper Sam Harris; Aaron, the strip club bouncer...These are all flawed human brings. Sam is the one who at least tries to redeem himself, but with tragic results. Does this happen in real life? Yes, every single day.

Larry Brown is a literary miracle. His prose style is inerrant--simple, straightforward, and incredibly evocative. This man writes like nobody else.

If you start this book, you will not be able to put it down. You'll be reading your brains out until you reach the end. This is the gift given to you by a great writer.

Lastly, people who don't know about Larry Brown think he was some kind of dark, brooding pessimist. Wrong. Larry was a friendly, kind, and loving person. But when it came time to write, he addressed the dark side of humanity, just like his predecessors, Steinbeck and Faulkner. I'll say it again: Realism. If you don't like realism, don't read Larry Brown; read some best-selling crap instead.
Aria
In Southern rythm and Southern tunes.

on the opposite to several 1 star reviews, it is the repetion, the minute detail, the giving of life to lives most non important details, linked with the plot and the action, that does it for me with with Larry Brown's novels.

Brown knew how to knit a pacing story in ueber -realism, and, to this reader, it looks anything but contrived.

A beautyfull novel. Larry Brown knew how to make the banal, the almost unnoticeable, come to life.