» » Sherlock Holmes: A Duel With the Devil (Adventures of Sherlock Holmes)

Free eBook Sherlock Holmes: A Duel With the Devil (Adventures of Sherlock Holmes) download

by Roger Jaynes

Free eBook Sherlock Holmes: A Duel With the Devil (Adventures of Sherlock Holmes) download ISBN: 0947533753
Author: Roger Jaynes
Publisher: Breese Books Ltd; First Edition 1st Printing edition (May 2003)
Language: English
Pages: 192
Category: Imaginative Literature
Subcategory: Classics
Size MP3: 1476 mb
Size FLAC: 1225 mb
Rating: 4.2
Format: mobi mbr lrf lit


Roger Jaynes does an excellent job of reacquainting readers with Arthur Conan Doyle and his prime character Sherlock Holmes in Duel with the Devil which is composed of three short stories

Roger Jaynes does an excellent job of reacquainting readers with Arthur Conan Doyle and his prime character Sherlock Holmes in Duel with the Devil which is composed of three short stories. In the final two, Jaynes writes of Holmes battles with his memesis Moriarty in The Case of the Baffled Courier and Moriarty's Fiendish Plan.

Sherlock Holmes book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Sherlock Holmes: A Duel with the Devil as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. As a series of bizarre, seemingly unconnected, cases unfold around.

o Sherlock Holmes she is always the woman. I have seldom heard him men-tion her under any other name. Come in! said Holmes. A man entered who could hardly have been less than six feet six inches in height, with the chest and limbs of a Hercules. His dress was rich with a rich-ness which would, in England, be looked upon as akin to bad taste. Heavy bands of astrakhan were slashed across the sleeves and fronts of his double-breasted coat, while the deep blue cloak which was thrown over his shoulders was lined with ame-coloured silk and secured at the neck with a brooch which consisted of a single aming beryl.

The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes is a collection of twelve short stories by Arthur Conan Doyle, first published on 14 October 1892

The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes is a collection of twelve short stories by Arthur Conan Doyle, first published on 14 October 1892. It contains the earliest short stories featuring the consulting detective Sherlock Holmes, which had been published in twelve monthly issues of The Strand Magazine from July 1891 to June 1892. The stories are collected in the same sequence, which is not supported by any fictional chronology

An interesting analysis of The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes by a Sherlock Holmes fa. And what is it its connection with the hat? This is the only case from The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes in which Holmes does not have any client

And what is it its connection with the hat? This is the only case from The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes in which Holmes does not have any client. In fact, Holmes gets indirectly involved while he examines an old, worn out ha. ome questions that Holmes needs to answer are

Published May 2003 by Breese Books.

Published May 2003 by Breese Books.

To Sherlock Holmes she is always THE woman. him mention her under any other name. in my mind with my wooing, and with the dark incidents of the. Study in Scarlet, I was seized with a keen desire to see Holmes

To Sherlock Holmes she is always THE woman. Study in Scarlet, I was seized with a keen desire to see Holmes. again, and to know how he was employing his extraordinary powers. His rooms were brilliantly lit, and, even as I looked up, I saw.

The Adventure of the Devil's Foot" is one of the 56 Sherlock Holmes short stories written by British author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. It is one of eight stories in the cycle collected in His Last Bow. Due to Holmes' declining health, his doctor sends him and Dr John Watson to the countryside to convalesce

LibriVox recording of The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Read by Ruth Golding.

LibriVox recording of The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. A collection of twelve short stories featuring Conan Doyle's legendary detective, originally published as single stories in Strand Magazine and subsequently collected into a single volume. There is not always a crime committed nor a culprit to find, and when there is, Holmes does not invariably get his man. However, his extraordinary powers of deduction generally solve the mystery, often to the discomfiture of the official police force.

PB looks never read...CLEAN
User reviews
นℕĨĈტℝ₦
"Sherlock Holmes: A Duel with the Devil" by Roger Jaynes is in reality three short stories. (Sometimes, I read too quickly when getting a Holmes book for my Kindle.) I have nothing against short stories; I was just expecting a novel. However, these three stories were good! The Devil here is, of course, the classic nemesis for Holmes: Professor Moriarty. The events take place shortly after Professor Moriarty was expelled from his University position. So the reader does get a good view of those early years of Holmes and The Professor.

Jaynes captures the atmosphere of Victorian London; his ability to create local color through place, sounds, and language is excellent. Jaynes' writing is good; his plots are well crafted and are filled with intrigue, twists and Holmes' faultless logic. Each story draws the reader in and thus reads quickly. The stories are all entertaining; however, the second story is a little weaker. I personally loved the third story because it develops and shows the close friendship between Holmes and Watson, something that is often not cultivated in other books. If you are a Holmes fan, I do recommend this book and its stories to you!
BroWelm
Consisting of two short stories and a novella, this was not only one of the better pastiches I've read recently, it also accomplished the successful utilization of Moriarty as Doyle intended him to be - a fiendishly clever intellect to rival and challenge Sherlock Holmes' own. He was a believable extension of the few tantalizing glimpses we are shown in Canon, and this author does an excellent job of bringing the great detective's nemesis to life.

All three stories were above par, though the last entry offered a compelling mystery and a lovely homage to Holmes and Watson's friendship. However, to be fair, each story epitomized what I look for in a pastiche; a puzzle that unfolds via a process of deductive reasoning, and goes beyond good character voices to depict interaction between the detective and his doctor that shows us the extent of their regard for one another. A simple enough request, yet I very seldom find it. It was here, in spades, and I look forward to reading this author's other Holmesian offerings.
Mr.Bean
We have gadgets to do just about everything for us. We carry powerful communications in the palm of our hand. There are machines that analyze blood and any other sample that might be found at a crime scene. So why, after 129 years, does Sherlock Holmes continue to hold sway in the world of crime and detection?

The first Holmes tale, "A Study in Scarlet," published in 1887 continues to be read to this day. Holmes has been a staple in the movies with more than 70 actors playing the title role in more than 200 films. Those of us who just can't get enough Holmes watch "Elementary" faithfully, accepting Jonny Lee Miller and Lucy Liu in the roles of Sherlock and Dr. Watson. Baffling!

I read the Conan Doyle canon as a child. I marveled at Holmes' ability to sniff a bit of ash and be able to tell just what variety of tobacco produced it. My image of Holmes was derived from the movies, first Basil Rathbone who was stiff and proper, then Jeremy Brett on the BBC who added action to the character and now Robert Downey, Jr. who has added humor. I must also mention Benedict Cumberbatch who, as a modern Sherlock, uses some of the aforementioned gadgets but still relies on his formidable brain to solve the case.

Writers have taken up pen, typewriter, word processor and computer to continue the legacy of a fictional character that is larger than life and who refuses to die. This has apparently been going on since 1893.

We all know that Holmes and Watson are paired, as are so many things, but without the great villain they might have been a mere ink spot in literary history. Roger Jaynes has produced, with the help of John Watson, of course, three cases heretofore unknown about the diabolical Moriarty. These tales were held back to keep those involved and those in their circle from becoming Moriarty's prey.

If you are a fan of the great detective, as I am, you might just want to add this well written collection to your library.
AGAD
Roger Jaynes does an excellent job of reacquainting readers with Arthur Conan Doyle and his prime character Sherlock Holmes in Duel with the Devil which is composed of three short stories. In the final two, Jaynes writes of Holmes battles with his memesis Moriarty in The Case of the Baffled Courier and Moriarty's Fiendish Plan. The latter serves up everyn nuance of Holmesian literature from the grimy streets of backwater London, Holmes steadfast relationship to Dr. Watson and his favorite cherry filled with lit shag that emits head circling smoke.

The Fiendish Plan enlists the Crimson Vandals to tag London obfuscating an art heist that Moriarty intends to blame on Holmes save for quick thinking by our detective and some muscle by Watson. This pair has come to mean cunning and action and Jaynes authors up some of the best writing among the many who have endeavored. For a little taste of Holmes you can't do better.
sergant
I always look for the good in a Holmes pastiche, since the author selected such an excellent protagonist. I had a hard time finding the positive in this collection of three short stories.
The first story was simply dull and dragged on. It took me three tries to complete it.
The second story was pretty much a variation on Doyle's classic, The Red Headed League. It's already been done: and quite well!
The final tale had as silly an ending as any Holmes story I have read.
The unifying theme of these three stories is that Holmes is battling against his nemesis, Professor James Moriarty. Thus, the title. There are extremely well done Moriarty pastiches out there by John Gardner and Michael Kurland. A Duel With the Devil was a poor collection in comparison. Buy something else.
Saithi
I always love reading Sherlock Holmes stories. This book has a good feel as if Dr Watson were writing it himself. I enjoyed it very much.