Free eBook Vathek download

by William Beckford

Free eBook Vathek download ISBN: 085417611X
Author: William Beckford
Publisher: Scolar Press (October 1971)
Language: English
Pages: 346
Category: Imaginative Literature
Subcategory: Classics
Size MP3: 1832 mb
Size FLAC: 1798 mb
Rating: 4.5
Format: mobi azw lit azw


Beckford's Gothic novel, Vathek, an Arabian tale, was originally written in French when the author was 21.

Beckford's Gothic novel, Vathek, an Arabian tale, was originally written in French when the author was 21. It is the story of Caliph Vathek, whose eye can kill at a glance, who makes a pact with the Devil, Eblis.

WILLIAM BECKFORD was born in 1760, the son of the famous Lord Mayor of London and the granddaughter of the Earl of Abercorn. Brought up at his father’s country seat at Fonthill in Wiltshire, he received his education at home, where he was often alone and free to indulge his vivid imagination. In 1777 he travelled abroad for the first time, visiting first Switzerland and then Italy, where he stayed with Sir William and Lady Catherine Hamilton, who became a trusted friend and adviser.

William Thomas Beckford (1760-1844) was an English novelist, art critic, travel writer and politician. VATHEK is considered a gothic novel, but there it little gothic about it. There are no churches or castles, and the maiden does not run from the caliph for long. However, there are a great many supernatural elements taken from Arab mythology, at least as they were understood by William Beckford. These elements may make this tale worth reading some 230 or so years after it was written.

Vathek (alternatively titled Vathek, an Arabian Tale or The History of the Caliph Vathek) is a Gothic novel written by William Beckford. It was composed in French beginning in 1782, and then translated into English by Reverend Samuel Henley in which. It was composed in French beginning in 1782, and then translated into English by Reverend Samuel Henley in which form it was first published in 1786 without Beckford's name as An Arabian Tale, From an Unpublished Manuscript, claiming to be translated directly from Arabic.

Vathek: by. Beckford, William, 1760-1844.

Top. American Libraries Canadian Libraries Universal Library Community Texts Project Gutenberg Biodiversity Heritage Library Children's Library. Vathek: by. London : Simpkin, Marshall, Hamilton, Kent.

William Beckford, John Beckford, Franz Blei. Book digitized by Google and uploaded to the Internet Archive by user tpb.

William Beckford, John Beckford, Franz Blei You can read Vathek by William Beckford, John Beckford, Franz Blei in our library for absolutely free. Read various fiction books with us in our e-reader.

This novel chronicles the fall from power of the Caliph Vathek, who renounces Islam and engages in a series of licentious and deplorable activities designed to gain him supernatural powers. At the end of the novel, instead of attaining these powers, Vathek descends into a hell ruled by the demon Eblis where he is doomed to wander endlessly and speechlessly.

THE HISTORY of the CALIPH VATHEK. CASSELL & COMPANY, Limited: LONDON, PARIS, NEW YORK & MELBOURNE. His family, originally of Gloucestershire, had thriven by the plantations in Jamaica; and his father, sent to school in England, and forming a school friendship at Westminster with Lord Mansfield, began the world in this country as a merchant, with inheritance of an enormous West India fortune.

Sampson, Low, Son and Marston, 1868 - 189 pages. Bibliographic information. The History of the Caliph Vathek Bayard Series.

User reviews
Whitemaster
First off... THIS IS A SATIRE, PEOPLE.

Vathek is such an anachronistic disaster that it barely makes sense, but worth reading for its historical significance. I cannot believe the number of negative reviews from people who obviously couldn't grasp the fact that Vathek is a satire. You the reader are not supposed to sympathize with Vathek or approve of his actions; you're supposed to chuckle and think "what an idiot" and then laugh some more at the horrible cultural mockery on almost every page.

Here's what your in for: An overdone parody of a muslim Caliph who resides in ancient Babylon goes on a vaguely Faustian escapade, following an Indian demon-thing to Hell in his quest to acquire King Solomon's talismans. King Solomon has a permanent residence in Hell as punishment for chasing after forbidden knowledge. Vathek's mother is an evil Magus who doesn't need to eat or sleep, who erected the Tower of Babel as an extension of their palace in Babylon, and she can use astrology to spy on people. Of course all the names are changed, muslims are "musselmans," Solomon is "Soliman," the tower of Babel is simply called "The Tower," etc., so someone who isn't very bright may not make the connections. The sum of all parts is comically bad, and it ends with a painful paragraph of moralizing drivel using a lot of words to say that hedonists go to hell when they die.

In order to "get" the humor, you need to have functional background knowledge of ancient Babylon, Solomonic lore, what real muslims do, etc, etc. It probably would seem like an awful book full of pointless violence if you don't understand any of the references. Also worth noting that Goethe was one of Beckford's contemporaries and competitors, hence his writing of a Faustian tale that, on the surface, seems like it couldn't be more different than Faust.
Stoneshaper
Vathek is a Caliph who didn't learn to rule his kingdom well, or how to behave correctly. He is primarily concerned with indulging his five senses. He is a sybarite. Extravagance being his native way, he builds five palaces onto the existing palace - one to over indulge each of his five senses to the point of satisfaction. Only Vathek is never really satisfied by anything. He always wants more power, a lovelier girl, more exotic food, a more sophisticated fragrance or a strange gift from a remote country. The fact is that Vathek is very self absorbed and when you are the Caliph, people let you get away with just about anything. It doesn't help that his mother is an evil sorceress and she enables all his bad behaviour.

Vathek builds a tower onto his palaces that gets close to heaven where supernatural forces are watching him, deciding what to do. A servant of evil disguised as a beggar comes to the palace with wondrous things Vathek has never seen before. When Vathek beholds them he is shocked. He asks the beggar many times what his name is and where the items came from. The beggar never replies. They kick the beggar repeatedly and throw him in jail. The next morning, the guards are dead and the beggar is gone. Mom does a divination and determines the beggar was more than he seems, and must be the key to power and riches of the preadimite kings. This is the path to evil, but the rewards are extravagantly outrageous. So, Mom pushes Junior to do some really rotten deeds, but he wasn't complaining. He does every rotten thing she asks.

The body of the story consists of Vathek at home and on the road indulging himself, repenting, indulging, repenting, etc. Until finally, well you will have to read the book to find out. I really enjoyed the ending. It was very creative in a cruel, everlasting way.

If you like fairytales and want a HEA, skip this one. This is more a Grimm type fairytale. Death, burned beards, lots of kicking and everlasting torment are not your average happenings for a Disney story, so don't read it to younger kids, unless you want to give them nightmares. You do get two dwarves, some geniis afrits and evil Dives(?) I'm not quite sure what an evil Dive is, but they cause untold amounts of evil, so leave them alone.

The moral of the story: be humble, be frugal, think of others before yourself.
BlackBerry
VATHEK is considered a gothic novel, but there it little gothic about it. There are no churches or castles, and the maiden does not run from the caliph for long. However, there are a great many supernatural elements taken from Arab mythology, at least as they were understood by William Beckford. These elements may make this tale worth reading some 230 or so years after it was written. Indeed, I found it delightful despite the digressions from the main narrative involving Vathek and his mother's quest for hidden knowledge and power in the hands of the forces of evil. This is a very orientalist tale envisioning a Middle East that was once rich in culture and empire, and for that it is also worth reading today.
Kakashkaliandiia
With a predictably four ending, this gothic tape is one of the originals, having been published in 1786. It gives firm evidence that the dark impulse has always been part of humanity. The language is charming, the settings suitably foreboding and dangerous, and the supernatural suitably creepy. Excellent!