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Free eBook Labyrinth (The Languedoc Trilogy) download

by Kate Mosse

Free eBook Labyrinth (The Languedoc Trilogy) download ISBN: 0425213978
Author: Kate Mosse
Publisher: Berkley; Reprint edition (February 6, 2007)
Language: English
Pages: 528
Category: Imaginative Literature
Subcategory: Action and Adventure
Size MP3: 1667 mb
Size FLAC: 1729 mb
Rating: 4.9
Format: docx azw rtf lrf


Similar books to Labyrinth (Languedoc Trilogy Book 1.

Similar books to Labyrinth (Languedoc Trilogy Book 1). Chance to win daily prizes. Sitting securely in the historical religious quest genre, Mosse's fluently written third novel (after Crucifix Lane) may tantalize (if not satisfy) the legions of Da VinciCode devotees with its promise of revelation about Christianity's truths.

The first of the Languedoc Trilogy, Labyrinth, appeared in 2005. Interview with Martin Goodman at the Philip Larkin Centre

The first of the Languedoc Trilogy, Labyrinth, appeared in 2005. A number one bestseller internationally, it has sold millions of copies and was the bestselling title in the UK for 2006. It also won the Richard & Judy Best Book at the British Book Awards 2006 and was named as one of Waterstones Top 25 books of the past 25 years  . Interview with Martin Goodman at the Philip Larkin Centre. Listen to Kate Mosse talking about Sepulchre on The Interview Online. Audio: Kate Mosse in conversation on the BBC World Service discussion programme The Forum.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Labyrinth (Languedoc Trilogy, as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

2005) (The first book in the Languedoc Trilogy series) A novel by Kate Mosse. Although she cannot understand the symbols and diagrams the book contains, Alais knows her destiny lies in protecting their secret, at all costs

2005) (The first book in the Languedoc Trilogy series) A novel by Kate Mosse. Awards Sainsbury's Popular Fiction Award Best Novel (nominee) The Richard and Judy Best Read of the Year Best Book (nominee). Although she cannot understand the symbols and diagrams the book contains, Alais knows her destiny lies in protecting their secret, at all costs. Skilfully blending the lives of two women divided by centuries but united by a common destiny, LABYRINTH is a powerful story steeped in the atmosphere and history of southern France.

La Cité de Carcassonne and Labyrinth by Kate Moss. Labyrinth (the Languedoc Trilogy). Booktopia has The Passage, The Passage Trilogy: Book 1 by Justin Cronin. Discover ideas about Reading Lists. Kate Mosse,don't confuse her with the clothes horse - this woman is the real deal and writes wonderful books - also make sure you read Sepulchre too and also The Winter Ghosts. The Passage - Justin Cronin Loved this book, not so much the second, waiting for the third.

The book, he says, contains the secret of the true Grail, and the ring, inscribed with a labyrinth, will identify a guardian of. .Kate Mosse is the New York Times bestselling author of The Winter Ghosts, Labyrinth, Sepulchre.

The book, he says, contains the secret of the true Grail, and the ring, inscribed with a labyrinth, will identify a guardian of the Grail. Now, as crusading armies gather outside the city walls of Carcassonne, it will take a tremendous sacrifice to keep the secret of the labyrinth safe. She is the cofounder and honorary director of the prestigious Orange Prize for Fiction. She lives in England and France.

In the Pyrenees mountains near Carcassonne, Alice, a volunteer at an archaeological dig, stumbles into a cave and makes a startling discovery-two crumbling skeletons, strange writings on the walls, and the pattern of a labyrinth. Eight hundred years earlier, on the eve of a brutal crusade that will rip apart southern France, a young woman named Alais is given a ring and a mysterious book for safekeeping by her father.

series The Languedoc Trilogy. The book, he says, contains the secret of the true Grail, and the ring, inscribed with a labyrinth, will identify a guardian of the Grail.

Praise for Labyrinth. Labyrinth might be described as the thinking woman’s summer reading, chick lit with A levels. It is a testimony to Kate Mosse’s control over her material that the two narratives never seem to repeat or collide or, indeed, swamp one another.

July 2005. In the Pyrenees mountains near Carcassonne, Alice, a volunteer at an archaeological dig, stumbles into a cave and makes a startling discovery-two crumbling skeletons, strange writings on the walls, and the pattern of a labyrinth. Eight hundred years earlier, on the eve of a brutal crusade that will rip apart southern France, a young woman named Alais is given a ring and a mysterious book for safekeeping by her father. The book, he says, contains the secret of the true Grail, and the ring, inscribed with a labyrinth, will identify a guardian of the Grail. Now, as crusading armies gather outside the city walls of Carcassonne, it will take a tremendous sacrifice to keep the secret of the labyrinth safe.
User reviews
Haralem
LABYRINTH by Kate Mosse is one of those books that have a superb beginning, and a not-so-good ending.

I loved the way this book started, with naive young-for-her-age Alice Tanner volunteering at an archaeological dig in south-western France. Something draws her up the hillside. She finds an old buckle. Then there is a rumbling sound and a huge boulder moves aside to show a door in the rock.

Yes, I know this strains credulity, but the writing was so good, I bought it.

After this set-up, we move back into the past, from July 2005 to July 1209. Alice Tanner is now 17-year-old Alais Pelletier, the favorite daughter of a Bertrand Pelletier, steward to Viscount Trencavel, who holds court at Carcassonne.

Storm clouds are rumbling over this regions as a huge army of French barons and Catholic priests is sweeping south to stamp out the Cathar heresy and grab those southern lands. Alais and her family get caught up in the “ethnic cleansing” that follows, as the northern French lords impose their ways upon the south, and try to eradicate the culture.

As others have remarked, this story is too long. I agree. I found myself skipping large chunks of it towards the end. And I think the reason for that is because the author (perhaps in a rush to finish this book) allows her writing to become careless. For example, she puts large chunks of explanation into the mouth of Audric Baillard, which is boring for the reader to read. This is a pity, because the beginning of this book shows that Ms. Mosse can write compelling prose. Three stars.
Aloo
I live in an area where Languedoc is the local patois so the book was pretty much required-reading for me and I enjoyed it. The structure of the book is chronologically quite complicated but evidently well-researched. Her descriptions of landscape are evocative though I'm not sure what 'scrub' vegetation is and 'flint' seemed to turn up where it doesn't belong. (OK a bit nit-picking I know, but still.........) The brutality of this period makes the massacre at Oradour sur Glane in 1944 seem almost routine. I'm not too sure about the central theme though which is a bit Dennis Wheatley, or DaVinci Code'ish but the story rattles along in an exciting way towards a symbolic conclusion.
Beabandis
This book is filled with well developed characters, at times stereotypical protagonists and villains. I'm glad I took 4 years of French because there are numerous references written in French that are not translated for the reader in the text, though the most difficult are. It's an intriguing story in the present day within another story from the 12th century in southern France. If you like historical fiction and suspense, give this book a try.
Rose Of Winds
This story redeemed itself in the final 25% of the book. The first part was enjoyable enough, but not really compelling. I didn't feel drawn to find out what would happen next. I began at some point to draw some guesses about what would occur, who was really who, etc. I was right about the guesses, but could not have really foreseen everything. It really picked up for me when Alice arrived at the mountaintop home of Baillard and he told his story. The ending was ultimately satisfying. I'm glad I didn't give up along the way. In the final analysis, I prefer this interpretation of the Grail story to the idea of a chalice or some other relic.
THOMAS
There were times in this book I wanted to just put it down but others in which I kept hoping that it would keep up the way it was going! It's a great plot line but at times I thought it just wasn't working. Give the book a try because it has potential to be loved by some, but not so much by others. Still worth giving it a chance.
Hrguig
This was a fascinating historical novel that juxtaposes 11th century struggles with 21st century realizations. The deep spiritual and cultural insights were very engaging. I found it hard to put down. My only criticism was that I occasionally confused characters with similar names. But overall I loved it and can't wait to read her next book.
Adrielmeena
Labyrinth was an entertaining read, capturing my attention for a day and a half. However, let me add one caveat: when I read this book, I had been in bed sick for several weeks and was devouring any book that I could obtain.

The plot was annoyingly transparent and the characters were exasperatingly shallow and underdeveloped, but the overall story *does* tickle the imagination. It reminded me of the Druid saying "the songs of our ancestors are also the songs of our children." That said, beware of the whiplash that the frequent time shifts in this book can cause!

Two things I do appreciate are Ms. Mosse's research into the story of the Cathars and her appreciation of southern France.

As a once-fluent Francophile, I had no problems with the French terms used, nor did I have any problems with the L'Occitane dialect used. Of course, I have no problem even when I am completely unfamiliar with a language, as I use online dictionaries if I don't know a word....and I *do* love learning new words. Native English speakers can be so damn lazy! Come on people, learn a thing or two! I do agree with others who've panned the poorly-executed similes and metaphors! Ugh, I was disgusted with quite a few.

If you're looking for an easy, quick, read that is imaginative, this book might interest you. If you're looking for * literature*, don't bother with this novel: though it's partially a piece of historical fiction, it also reads like a trashy romance novel.
Didn't know what to expect but was immediately pulled into the story and fell for the cast of characters. The flash backs were expertly done. Didn't want to put the book down. Did not see the end coming. Have ordered the next two books in this series.