Free eBook The Incomers download

by Moira McPartlin

Free eBook The Incomers download ISBN: 1905916450
Author: Moira McPartlin
Publisher: Fledgling Press (March 14, 2012)
Language: English
Pages: 294
Category: Imaginative Literature
Subcategory: Action and Adventure
Size MP3: 1604 mb
Size FLAC: 1319 mb
Rating: 4.8
Format: mbr doc lrf lrf


In the meantime, if you know any books with non-binary main characters you think we should include, please let us know.

In the meantime, if you know any books with non-binary main characters you think we should include, please let us know. Success against the odds. Ellie is confused by the strange culture that she encounters in her husband's home country - 1960's Scotland. It's nothing like her West African village.

It is only then she realises that prejudice of incomers exists everywhere, and acceptance grows if nurtured by familiarity. This novel cleverly explores historical racial prejudice in Scotland and may raise some difficult cultural issues, perhaps still applicable 45 years later. One fee. Stacks of books. Read whenever, wherever. Your phone is always with you, so your books are too – even when you’re offline. Bookmate – an app that makes you want to read.

I greatly enjoyed this novel by Scottish author Moira McPartlin. I particularly liked the tender portrayal of the mother’s relationship with her baby son Nat. Rarely do I find infants and babies portrayed convincingly in novels, yet this relationship felt credible and full of warmth.

Select Format: Paperback. Release Date: January 2001.

Mission-raised Ellie Amadi expects to live a dream life when she and her son Nat leave home in West Africa to join her white, estate factor, husband James in the Fife mining village of Hollyburn. In 1966 Fife, mixed marriages are unusual, never mind interracial ones, and Ellie soon witnesses the villagers' ignorance of outsiders. Ellie struggles to adapt to her new life and rebels against her husband's pressure on her to conform

The author, Moira McPartlin, grew up in a small Fife mining village, and . The Incomers" is a thoughtful and thought provoking book which, despite its historical setting, has considerable resonance for everyone in Scotland today.

The author, Moira McPartlin, grew up in a small Fife mining village, and you get the feeling it was very like her fictional Hollyburn. Setting the novel in the 1960s works very well. It is sufficiently far removed in time from today to allow us the luxury of imagining we are looking in on a Scotland which was simply less enlightened than today's: a Scotland in which sectarianism was so prevalent it left little room for racism.

I've been clearing out old notebooks from 2005 filled with my writing doubts, attempts at writing the novel that became The Incomers, 'morning pages', 1st draft stories( now published) many, many trips abroad with work and ending with my resignation. What a momentous year that was. Moira McPartlin.

Mission-raised Ellie Amadi expects to live a dream life when she and her son Nat leave home in West Africa to join her white, estate factor, husband James in the Fife mining village of Hollyburn. In 1966 Fife, mixed marriages are unusual, never mind interracial ones, and Ellie soon witnesses the villagers' ignorance of outsiders. Ellie struggles to adapt to her new life and rebels against her husband's pressure on her to conform. When she is accused of neglecting her baby, and subjected to an allegation of witchcraft, Ellie questions her ability to go on living among white faces. The story draws on deep parallels between the cultures of West Africa and Scotland. Each chapter ends with a vernacular 'party line' telephone conversation between two village women, tracking the initial animosity towards Ellie and gradually, a grudging acceptance of her. When Nat is abducted by the school bully and nearly drowns, Ellie is stunned by the hostility she receives from an African male doctor. It is only then she realises that prejudice of incomers exists everywhere, and acceptance grows if nurtured by familiarity. This novel cleverly explores historical racial prejudice in Scotland and may raise some difficult cultural issues, perhaps still applicable 45 years later.
User reviews
Cildorais
It took forever to get here, that was the only problem. Apparently a replacement had to be sent.
The Book itself was great!
Delan
I grew up in the 60s on the West coast of Scotland and everything about this story - the attitudes / the prejudice / the various accents used and well depicted in the vernacular / is authentic. It is possible to see the events from everyone's perspective and without pioneers like Ellie change and acceptance would never have happened.
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I greatly enjoyed this novel by Scottish author Moira McPartlin. I particularly liked the tender portrayal of the mother’s relationship with her baby son Nat. Rarely do I find infants and babies portrayed convincingly in novels, yet this relationship felt credible and full of warmth. I devoured the novel over 3 days and was in awe of the author’s research. I’m glad I came across this author and ‘The Incomers’ is definitely a book that will stay with me.