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Free eBook Starting Out: Sicilian Najdorf (Starting Out - Everyman Chess) download

by Richard Palliser

Free eBook Starting Out: Sicilian Najdorf (Starting Out - Everyman Chess) download ISBN: 1857443926
Author: Richard Palliser
Publisher: Everyman Chess; 1st edition (April 1, 2006)
Language: English
Pages: 240
Category: Humour and Entertainment
Subcategory: Puzzles and Games
Size MP3: 1389 mb
Size FLAC: 1376 mb
Rating: 4.4
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Richard Palliser is to be congratulated on this excellent introductory book on the Najdorf variation of the Sicilian Defense, one of the more popular chess openings

Only 13 left in stock (more on the way). Richard Palliser is to be congratulated on this excellent introductory book on the Najdorf variation of the Sicilian Defense, one of the more popular chess openings. It starts as follows: 1 e4 c5 2 Nf3 d6 3 d4 cxd4 4 Nxd4 Nf6 5 Nc3 a6. Many chess champions have played the Najdorf for Black. Does that mean that you ought to do so as well? Many people would say yes.

Starting Out: Sicilian Najdorf. As with previous works in the popular Everyman Chess Starting Out series, the reader is helped throughout with a plethora of notes, tips and warnings highlighting the vital characteristics of the Sicilian Najdorf and of opening play in general. Written by a Sicilian Najdorf expert. All the main lines are covered. Ideal for the improving player.

Find books Staring Out: Closed Sicilian offers the white- piece chess player an aggressive wa. .

English International master Richard Palliser presents Starting Out: Closed Sicilian, an in-depth guide for intermediate to advanced chess players. Staring Out: Closed Sicilian offers the white- piece chess player an aggressive way to attack the Sicilian while avoiding the extreme complexity of opening theory associated with Open Sicilians. Being aware of core themes is more important than memorizing variations in the Closed Sicilian, making it valuable to players who prefer to immerse themselves in the experience of the game rather than rely heavily on rote study.

Page 1 Page 2 starting out: closed sicilian RICHARD PALLISER EVERYMAN CHESS Gloucester. As with other books in the Starting Out series, this book avoids deep theory as much as possible. Attacking with 1 e4, John Emms (Everyman 2001). Beating the Anti-Sicilians Joe Gallagher (Batsford. Starting Out: The Caro-Kann (Starting Out - Everyman Chess). As with other books in the Starting Out series, this book avoids deep theory as much as possible Starting Out: The Scotch Game (Starting Out - Everyman Chess). 84 MB·886 Downloads·New! In this easy-to-read guide, Grandmaster and openings expert John Emms goes back to basics, studying.

Start by marking Starting Out: Sicilian Najdorf as Want to Read . Published April 1st 2006 by Everyman Chess.

Start by marking Starting Out: Sicilian Najdorf as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Grandmaster Richard Palliser studies the Sicilian Najdorf in a simplistic way, introducing the crucial initial moves and ideas and taking care to explain the reasoning behind them, something that has sometimes been neglected or taken for granted. Starting Out: Sicilian Najdorf (Starting Out - Everyman Chess). 1857443926 (ISBN13: 9781857443929).

This book introduces early moves and ideas, and explains the reasoning behind them. Publisher:Everyman Chess.

book by Richard Palliser. This book introduces early moves and ideas, and explains the reasoning behind them. It includes notes, tips and warnings highlighting the vital characteristics of the Sicilian Najdorf and of opening play in general.

Glenn Flear - New In Chess 'They will fill a serious gap in the current chess literature, and I'm sure they will be extremely popular with amateur chess players. About Richard Palliser. Former British Championship winner Joe Gallagher is an English Grandmaster who has been living in Switzerland for a number of years and is a regular member of the Swiss national team. He has many fine books to his name and has a deserved reputation as a first class writer.

to by Beachdud67 is, "Starting Out: Sicilian Najdorf", by Richard Palliser. Also, books on the Sicilian Najdorf point out these tactical possibilities and the squares that they occur on.

For class players there is actually a book called "Starting Out with the Sicilian" by Everyman Press that covers a number of variations of the Sicilian and explains the ideas behind the variations. shepi13 wrote: I also have a najdorf book by Nunn. The 3rd book referred to by Beachdud67 is, "Starting Out: Sicilian Najdorf", by Richard Palliser. There are other books on the Scheveningen and the.

Starting Out: Closed Sicilian By Richard Palliser First published in 2006 by Gloucester Publishers plc (formerly .

Starting Out: Closed Sicilian By Richard Palliser First published in 2006 by Gloucester Publishers plc (formerly Every. Bibliography Books Anti-Sicilians: A Guide for Black, Dorian Rogozenko (Gambit 2003) Attacking with 1 e4, John Emms (Everyman 2001) Beating the Anti-Sicilians, Joe Gallagher (Batsford 1994) Closed System of the Sicilian Defence, Attila Schneider (Caissa Chess Books 1999) Garry Kasparov on My Great Predecessors: Part II, Garry Kasparov (Everyman 2003) Garry Kasparov on My Great Predecessors: Part III, Garry Kasparov.

Grandmaster Joe Gallagher studies the Sicilian Najdorf in a simplistic way, introducing the crucial initial moves and ideas and taking care to explain the reasoning behind them, something that has sometimes been neglected or taken for granted.
User reviews
Kison
I'm a FIDE expert and own well over 100 opening books. Several months ago I decided to change my repertoire from the French to the Najdorf Sicilian. This book is the best single source available that I found. The book was likely completed in 2005, and theory has moved forward somewhat. Too bad that Palliser didn't update the book. Also, too bad Deep Rybka wasn't available then, since it rehabilitates some lines and nixes others. Anyway, except for the line typo I found on Pg. 18, the book seems well written, although perhaps it could be better organized. My one pet peeve is that the critical lines are usually reserved for the end of the chapter, rather than the beginning. The book provides good coverage of the lines, and does provide alternative lines for Black. I give the book my solid recommendation.
Westened
Perfect way to begin playing the Najdorf with confidence
Xcorn
no comment
Runehammer
I'm not sure if the previous reviewer actually read the book. It covers all the main variations, not just the Karpov Approach. For example: 71 pages on the English Attack(both e5 and Ng4), 36 pages on Fisher's 6 Bc4, 51 pages on 6.Bg5 and finally 20 pages on 6.f4 and minor variations.

The Najdorf is extremely complex and sharp as an opening option for black. Don't buy this book if you don't want to devote many, many hours to understanding the ideas of this opening. I will tell you that I have come to a much better understanding of this opening as I read through this book. It is also essential to learn some of the forcing lines in certain variations (e.g. Poisioned Pawn). There are many examples of "only one move" situations....but then when you make those only moves your game is grand.
Globus
Richard Palliser is to be congratulated on this excellent introductory book on the Najdorf variation of the Sicilian Defense, one of the more popular chess openings. It starts as follows: 1 e4 c5 2 Nf3 d6 3 d4 cxd4 4 Nxd4 Nf6 5 Nc3 a6.

Many chess champions have played the Najdorf for Black. Does that mean that you ought to do so as well? Many people would say yes. I wouldn't. The reason that these great champions play it is that they want to win with Black against strong masters or even grandmasters. But suppose you are playing someone who is noticeably weaker than you? You may well have simply evened the odds against someone you would normally beat, even with Black.

I feel that the problem is that White will play an aggressive system, where one Black error means curtains. Not just a good position that White could have or should have won, but a position that Black has to resign. White can be rated much lower than Black and still be very well booked on a dangerous attack. Black will need to defend carefully. If Black forgets the proper defense, that's not good at all. Worse, it's probably going to be White, not Black, who comes up with a TN (theoretical novelty). White simply has too many options for this not to be the case. And White can spend a while doing home analysis before the game with the aid of a computer. Yes, White is more likely to come up with a surprise than Black. And not knowing White's line, Black is going to have trouble saving the game.

The book begins with a chapter on 6 Be2 for White. This has been a favorite of a World Champion, Anatoly Karpov. Karpov has had a tendency to slowly outplay most of his opponents, and 6 Be2 is a fine move for him. I do not recommend it for the rest of us. Next, we get to the most popular line, 6 Be3. That is a good line, but I don't recommend it for White either. For one thing, I feel rather strongly that putting that Bishop on e3 is generally a strategic error in the Sicilian. It always seems to get hit with moves such as Ng4 by Black at the most inconvenient times. By the way, 6...Ng4 is a pretty good answer to 6 Be3, as the author spends over 30 pages pointing out.

The next White idea is 6 Bc4, Bobby Fischer's favorite line. It's not bad, although it is not my favorite move. The author also discusses a couple of minor lines, such as 6 f4 and 6 g3. But they aren't major threats to Black's setup.

No, the move that I think puts Black in the gravest danger of losing rating points to a supposedly vastly inferior player is 6 Bg5. That is what I recommend, and Palliser spends enough time on this move to get his readers acquainted with the main ideas.

The main line that I think makes the most sense for White is 6 Bg5 e6 7 f4 Be7 8 Qf3 Qc7 9 O-O-O Nbd7 10 Bd3 b5 11 Rhe1 Bb7 12 Qg3 b4 13 Nd5 exd5 14 exd5 Kd8 15 Nc6+. Not only is Black likely to get in trouble in this line, there are all sorts of alternative lines for White along the way. Palliser shows us a good game in this variation.

As the author explains, a complicated alternative line for Black is 6 Bg5 e6 7 f4 Qb6, the infamous "Poisoned Pawn" variation. Palliser shows us a little about the continuation 8 Qd2 Qxb2 9 Rb1 (as the author says, 9 Nb3 is also a good try) 9...Qa3 in this book. He recommends 10 f5 here, which is a good line, although I happen to prefer 10 Be2 Be7 11 e5. Another popular choice for Black is 6 Bg5 e6 7 f4 b5, the Polugaevsky variation. That's risky. The author shows us how Peter Leko plays against this with White, and I recommend looking at his lines here.

In my very first tournament chess game against a Master, I played White against the Najdorf. I think my game shows some of the resources for both sides in this interesting defence:

1 e4 c5 2 Nf3 e6 (My opponent was well aware that the White side of the Najdorf was my specialty, and that playing 2...d6 3 d4 cxd4 4 Nxd4 Nf6 5 Nc3 a6 here would simply be asking for trouble.) 3 d4 cxd4 4 Nxd4 Nf6 5 Nc3 d6 6 Bc4 (Black has avoided my favorite line against the Najdorf and can now play a6 with confidence.) 6...a6 7 Qe2 b5 8 Bb3 Be7 (As Palliser explains, this aggressive system for White simply gives Black a good game. Now 9 Be3 is recommended for White, but as I explained earlier, I had no intention of playing that move.) 9 Rg1 (My opponent did not even seem surprised.) 9...O-O 10 g4 b4 11 g5 bxc3 12 gxf6 (This gives Black a chance to lose at once, as 12...Qa5? 13 Rxg7+ wins for White.) 12...Bxf6 13 bxc3 Qc7 14 Qf3 Kh8 15 Bh6 (Realizing that I had been outplayed, I was hoping that Black would try to defend with 15...Rg8, as I was planning 16 Qxf6! gxf6 17 Rxg8+ Kxg8 18 Kd2, with a draw. Unfortunately, I had overlooked 15...Be5, which gives Black an excellent game as 16 Rg5 gets splattered by 16...Nd7. Against 15...Be5, I would have had to try 16 Bg5, but Black would probably have won after that. Anyway, instead of any of this, something ridiculous happened.) 15...Nd7?? 16 Qxf6 Qxc3+ 17 Ke2 gxf6 18 Bg7+ Black Resigns.

I highly recommend this book.
Marirne
I was disappointed in this book. It was confusing in that the author tries to juggle too many lines of analysis at the same time. The lines that I could follow were helpful, but it read like a book whose pages had gotten mixed up and they couldn't remember what order to put them back in. Especially for a beginning player, this book will be confusing. It follows only one variation (Karpov's Be2 line for white) of the Najdorf. I was mislead by the content description to think that most variations would be covered to some extent. It was hard to finish.