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by Irving Singer

Free eBook Cinematic Mythmaking: Philosophy in Film (Irving Singer Library) download ISBN: 0262515156
Author: Irving Singer
Publisher: The MIT Press (September 24, 2010)
Language: English
Pages: 256
Category: Humour and Entertainment
Subcategory: Movies
Size MP3: 1704 mb
Size FLAC: 1420 mb
Rating: 4.3
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Singer incisively disentangles the strands of different myths in the films he discusses.

In Cinematic Mythmaking, Irving Singer explores the hidden and overt use of myth in various films and, in general, the philosophical elements of a film's meaning. Mythological themes, Singer writes, perform a crucial role in cinematic art and even philosophy itself. Singer incisively disentangles the strands of different myths in the films he discusses

Cinematic Mythmaking is an important addition to Irving Singer's on-going studies of the art of the filmmaker as an exploration of perennial philosophic questions embodied in a new imaginative form.

Cinematic Mythmaking is an important addition to Irving Singer's on-going studies of the art of the filmmaker as an exploration of perennial philosophic questions embodied in a new imaginative form. Here he navigates the relations between what is perhaps the oldest mode of narrative mythic thinking and the unique resources and constraints of our youngest art. He writes about this 'composite art' with an admirable balance of analytic lucidity and personal engagement.

Cambridge, MA and London: The MIT Press. cognitivism, it is refreshing to find a book of reflections as philosophical and. personal as Irving S inger’s Cinematic Mythmaking. 1 See Irving Singer, Reality T ransformed: Film as Meaning an d Technique (2000), Three Philosophical Filmmakers: Hitchcock, Welles, Renoir (2005), Ingmar. Bergman, Cinematic Philosopher: Reflections on His Creativity (2007). Film-Philoso phy 1. 2010.

Irving Singer (December 24, 1925 – February 1, 2015) was an American professor of philosophy who was on the faculty of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology for 55 years and wrote over 20 books. He was the author of books on various topics, including cinema, love, sexuality, and the philosophy of George Santayana. He also wrote on the subject of film, including writings about the work of film directors Ingmar Bergman, Alfred Hitchcock, Jean Renoir, and Orson Welles. Singer incisively disentangles the strands of different myths in the films he discusses

In Cinematic Mythmaking: Philosophy in Film, Irving Singer continues his philosophical exploration of the nature of love by posing the interesting question: How do movies modernize mythology.

In Cinematic Mythmaking: Philosophy in Film, Irving Singer continues his philosophical exploration of the nature of love by posing the interesting question: How do movies modernize mythology. In the course of his discussion of the cinematic treatment of a variety of romantic myths, including Dido and Aeneas, Orpheus, Tristan and Iseult, Pygmalion and Galatea, and Don Juan, it becomes clear that cinephilia is one of the loves being explored in this book.

Автор: Singer Irving Название: Cinematic Mythmaking: Philosophy in Film .

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Irving Singer, professor emeritus of philosophy at MIT, has died. Several of Singer’s course lectures are viewable on MIT OpenCourseWare, on topics including Philosophy in Film and Other Media ; Feeling and Imagination in Art, Science, and Technology ; and The Nature of Creativity. He had been at MIT since 1958. Timothy Madigan, an associate professor of philosophy at St. John Fisher College, recalled Singer’s influence on his work: Irving was a role model to me, and a true exemplar of a man of wisdom. He will be greatly missed, but his works will continue to live on. The notice goes on to detail other aspects of Singer’s.

Cinematic Mythmaking : Philosophy in Film. Film is the supreme medium for mythmaking

Cinematic Mythmaking : Philosophy in Film. Film is the supreme medium for mythmaking. The gods and heroes of mythology are both larger than life and deeply human; they teach us about the world, and they tell us a good story. Similarly, our experience of film is both distant and intimate.

Mythic themes and philosophical probing in film as an art form, as seen in works of Preston Sturges, Jean Cocteau, Stanley Kubrick, and various other filmmakers.

Film is the supreme medium for mythmaking. The gods and heroes of mythology are both larger than life and deeply human; they teach us about the world, and they tell us a good story. Similarly, our experience of film is both distant and intimate. Cinematic techniques―panning, tracking, zooming, and the other tools in the filmmaker's toolbox―create a world that is unlike reality and yet realistic at the same time. We are passive spectators, but we also have a personal relationship with the images we are seeing. In Cinematic Mythmaking, Irving Singer explores the hidden and overt use of myth in various films and, in general, the philosophical elements of a film's meaning. Mythological themes, Singer writes, perform a crucial role in cinematic art and even philosophy itself. Singer incisively disentangles the strands of different myths in the films he discusses. He finds in Preston Sturges's The Lady Eve that Barbara Stanwyck's character is not just the biblical Eve but a liberated woman of our times; Eliza Doolittle in the filmed versions of Shaw's Pygmalion is not just a statue brought to life but instead a heroic woman who must survive her own dark night of the soul. The protagonist of William Wyler's The Heiress and Anieszka Holland's Washington Square is both suffering Dido and an awakened Amazon. Singer reads Cocteau's films―including La Belle et la Bête, Orphée, and The Testament of Orpheus―as uniquely mythological cinematic poetry. He compares Kubrickean and Homeric epics and analyzes in depth the self-referential mythmaking of Federico Fellini in many of his movies, including . The aesthetic and probing inventiveness in film, Singer shows us, restores and revives for audiences in the twenty-first century myths of creation, of the questing hero, and of ideals―both secular and religious―that have had enormous significance throughout the human search for love and meaning in life.

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